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Timing is running out for extra credit towards loan forgiveness
The Department of Education is temporarily waiving some requirements for earning credit towards Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) and Income-Driven Repayment (IDR) forgiveness. Some borrowers may need to take additional actions to get this credit.

Find advice for your student loans

This page offers guidance using basic information about your student loans. Learn about your options and find a strategy that works for your situation.

Let's get started. Select the situation that best describes where you are with your loans.


Let’s see if there’s a way to ease this stress!

Your options depend on the type of loans. What type of student loans do you have?

Not sure? You can check on whether you have federal loans at www.studentaid.gov . And your free credit report, which you can get at www.annualcreditreport.com , should list all your loans.

Don't panic. We can help!

You're not alone if you've received a letter from a debt collector after missing payments. Your options to get out of default depend on the type of loans you have. What do you have?

Not sure? You can check on whether you have federal loans at www.studentaid.gov . And your free credit report, which you can get at www.annualcreditreport.com , should list all your loans.

It can be tricky to figure out the student loan strategy that works best for you.

Your options will depend on your situation. What type of student loans do you have?

Not sure? You can check on whether you have federal loans at www.studentaid.gov . And your free credit report, which you can get at www.annualcreditreport.com , should list all your loans.

Glad it's going well!

You may have options to improve your strategy for paying off your loans. What type of student loans do you have?

Not sure? You can check on whether you have federal loans at www.studentaid.gov . And your free credit report, which you can get at www.annualcreditreport.com , should list all your loans.

Prepare for changes in student loans this year

There are major changes—and opportunities—in federal student loans coming up in 2022.

Protect yourself from student loan scams

All these changes make a ripe environment for student loan scams. In addition to the policies listed above, learn more about the existing student loan forgiveness programs here .

It may be a scam if someone you don't know:

  • asks you to verify your income, social security number, or other personal information over the phone
  • promises to reduce or eliminate your student loans
  • requests your Federal Student Aid information
  • pressures you to pay up-front fees
  • claims to be affiliated with the Department of Education or your current student loan servicer

Using the names of politicians in your online searches may lead to more scams in the search results, as scammers try to take advantage of confusing news. Studentaid.gov should be your trusted source for up-to-date student loan information.

If you are suspicious of a company contacting you, contact your current servicer. More tips on spotting scammers can be found on the CFPB's fraud and scams page.