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Help is available for renters
The CDC moratorium ended on August 26, 2021, but help is available. Apply for money to cover rent and utilities today.

What to do if you're facing eviction

If you received a demand for rent, an eviction notice, or an eviction lawsuit, you’re in the right place.

We can help you understand your rights and what next steps to take.

Select your situation to see what you can do

If you want to stay in your home, make a plan to catch up on your rent.

Get help with rent and utilities

You can apply to state or local organizations for federal money to cover rent, utilities, and other housing costs.  Learn more about emergency rental assistance.

Talk with your landlord about making a repayment plan

Find out if your landlord is willing to work with you or if they plan to file an eviction lawsuit. Sometimes, the hardest part is just getting the conversation started.

Too many renters give up before they have a chance to go to court. You don’t have to be one of them. Help is available.

Talk with a lawyer, don’t delay

You may qualify for free legal help . If you’re a servicemember, talk with your local Legal Assistance Office.

Get help with rent and utilities

You can apply to state or local organizations for federal money to cover rent, utilities, and other housing costs. Learn about emergency rental assistance.

Learn more from the court

You can call the court clerk and ask these questions about your case:

  • I understand that I have the right to file a written answer explaining to the court why I should not be evicted. What is the deadline for me to file an answer?
  • Is there a court date yet?
  • Can I get more time to apply for rental assistance?
  • Can the court help me work something out with my landlord? Does the court offer mediation or housing counselors?

File an answer

You have the right to file a written answer explaining to the court why you should not be evicted. If you don’t have a lawyer yet, you can file an answer on your own.

  • Explain your situation and what you are doing to try and find help.
  • Describe what your landlord has or hasn’t done to get the federal rental assistance funds.
  • If you applied for rental assistance and are waiting for a decision from a local organization, include that in your answer, too.

The judge may delay or dismiss the eviction because you are trying to get help.

Visit LawHelp.org to learn how to file an Answer to the eviction lawsuit in your state

Apply for help to cover the cost of moving, a security deposit, and application fees

Emergency rental assistance isn’t just for back rent. Find out if your local rental assistance program is offering help to people seeking a new home.  Find your local rental assistance program.

Find out about state or local protections

Some state and local areas have eviction moratoriums that also delay evictions. Use this tool to find out about state and local eviction moratoriums.

If you are not protected by a moratorium, ask these questions:

  • When will the eviction be carried out?
  • Are there ways the eviction can be stopped if you pay the landlord (or the court) the rent that is owed?

Legal help

If your landlord is threatening to evict you, or you need help understanding your rights, talk to a lawyer. You may qualify for free legal aid, based on your income.

More eviction help

Take advantage of free housing help

Housing counselors can help you find resources in your area and make a plan.

If you’d like help from a local expert, contact the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)’s housing counseling program.

Call 800-569-4287or find a housing counselor

Know your rights

You may have additional rights such as:

  • Debt collection rights
  • Right to report a bad landlord
  • Stay in your home as a survivor of domestic violence
  • Right to report housing discrimination

Know your tenant and debt collection rights