Skip to main content

About us

We're the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a U.S. government agency that makes sure banks, lenders, and other financial companies treat you fairly.

Learn how the CFPB can help you

What should I do if I have a reverse mortgage and I received a notice that I am “delinquent,” “in default,” or behind on my property taxes and insurance?

Act quickly. If you delay, or ignore the notice, you could eventually be forced to leave your home.

Keeping current on your property taxes and homeowners insurance is a condition of your reverse mortgage. If you get behind, you are considered “in default” on your reverse mortgage. Default means that you are not meeting the requirements you agreed to when you took out the loan. Unless you take steps to “cure,” or fix your default, your loan could get foreclosed on and you could be evicted.

If you can afford to pay your taxes or insurance, do it right away. Find out where to send your payment. You may need to submit your payment to your reverse mortgage company or directly to the tax authority or insurance company.

If you can’t afford to pay your taxes and/or insurance, you should see a reverse mortgage foreclosure prevention counselor. This special type of counseling is free. It could help you make the best choice for you.

Was this page helpful to you?

Note: Do not include sensitive information like your name, contact information, account number, or social security number in this field.

The content on this page provides general consumer information. It is not legal advice or regulatory guidance. The CFPB updates this information periodically. This information may include links or references to third-party resources or content. We do not endorse the third-party or guarantee the accuracy of this third-party information. There may be other resources that also serve your needs.

Read full answer Hide full answer