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Comment for 1024.41 - Loss Mitigation Procedures

This version is the current regulation

41(b) Receipt of a loss mitigation application.

1. Successors in interest.

i. If a servicer receives a loss mitigation application from a potential successor in interest before confirming that person's identity and ownership interest in the property, the servicer may, but need not, review and evaluate the loss mitigation application in accordance with the procedures set forth in § 1024.41. If a servicer complies with the requirements of § 1024.41 for a complete loss mitigation application submitted by a potential successor in interest before confirming that person's identity and ownership interest in the property, § 1024.41(i)'s limitation on duplicative requests applies to that person, provided the servicer's evaluation of loss mitigation options available to the person would not have resulted in a different determination due to the person's confirmation as a successor in interest if it had been conducted after the servicer confirmed the person's status as a successor in interest.

ii. If a servicer receives a loss mitigation application from a potential successor in interest and elects not to review and evaluate the loss mitigation application before confirming that person's identity and ownership interest in the property, the servicer must preserve the loss mitigation application and all documents submitted in connection with the application, and, upon such confirmation, the servicer must review and evaluate the loss mitigation application in accordance with the procedures set forth in § 1024.41 if the property is the confirmed successor in interest's principal residence and the procedures set forth in § 1024.41 are otherwise applicable. For purposes of § 1024.41, the servicer must treat the loss mitigation application as if it had been received on the date that the servicer confirmed the successor in interest's status. If the loss mitigation application is incomplete at the time of confirmation because documents submitted by the successor in interest became stale or invalid after they were submitted and confirmation is 45 days or more before a foreclosure sale, the servicer must identify the stale or invalid documents that need to be updated in a notice pursuant to § 1024.41(b)(2).

41(b)(1) Complete loss mitigation application.

1. In general. A servicer has flexibility to establish its own application requirements and to decide the type and amount of information it will require from borrowers applying for loss mitigation options. In the course of gathering documents and information from a borrower to complete a loss mitigation application, a servicer may stop collecting documents and information for a particular loss mitigation option after receiving information confirming that, pursuant to any requirements established by the owner or assignee of the borrower's mortgage loan, the borrower is ineligible for that option. A servicer may not stop collecting documents and information for any loss mitigation option based solely upon the borrower's stated preference but may stop collecting documents and information for any loss mitigation option based on the borrower's stated preference in conjunction with other information, as prescribed by any requirements established by the owner or assignee. A servicer must continue to exercise reasonable diligence to obtain documents and information from the borrower that the servicer requires to evaluate the borrower as to all other loss mitigation options available to the borrower. For example:

i. Assume a particular loss mitigation option is only available for borrowers whose mortgage loans were originated before a specific date. Once a servicer receives documents or information confirming that a mortgage loan was originated after that date, the servicer may stop collecting documents or information from the borrower that the servicer would use to evaluate the borrower for that loss mitigation option, but the servicer must continue its efforts to obtain documents and information from the borrower that the servicer requires to evaluate the borrower for all other available loss mitigation options.

ii. Assume applicable requirements established by the owner or assignee of the mortgage loan provide that a borrower is ineligible for home retention loss mitigation options if the borrower states a preference for a short sale and provides evidence of another applicable hardship, such as military Permanent Change of Station orders or an employment transfer more than 50 miles away. If the borrower indicates a preference for a short sale or, more generally, not to retain the property, the servicer may not stop collecting documents and information from the borrower pertaining to available home retention options solely because the borrower has indicated such a preference, but the servicer may stop collecting such documents and information once the servicer receives information confirming that the borrower has an applicable hardship under requirements established by the owner or assignee, such as military Permanent Change of Station orders or employment transfer.

2. When an inquiry or prequalification request becomes an application. A servicer is encouraged to provide borrowers with information about loss mitigation programs. If in giving information to the borrower, the borrower expresses an interest in applying for a loss mitigation option and provides information the servicer would evaluate in connection with a loss mitigation application, the borrower's inquiry or prequalification request has become a loss mitigation application. A loss mitigation application is considered expansively and includes any “prequalification” for a loss mitigation option. For example, if a borrower requests that a servicer determine if the borrower is “prequalified” for a loss mitigation program by evaluating the borrower against preliminary criteria to determine eligibility for a loss mitigation option, the request constitutes a loss mitigation application.

3. Examples of inquiries that are not applications. The following examples illustrate situations in which only an inquiry has taken place and no loss mitigation application has been submitted:

i. A borrower calls to ask about loss mitigation options and servicer personnel explain the loss mitigation options available to the borrower and the criteria for determining the borrower's eligibility for any such loss mitigation option. The borrower does not, however, provide any information that a servicer would consider for evaluating a loss mitigation application.

ii. A borrower calls to ask about the process for applying for a loss mitigation option but the borrower does not provide any information that a servicer would consider for evaluating a loss mitigation application.

4. Although a servicer has flexibility to establish its own requirements regarding the documents and information necessary for a loss mitigation application, the servicer must act with reasonable diligence to collect information needed to complete the application. A servicer must request information necessary to make a loss mitigation application complete promptly after receiving the loss mitigation application. Reasonable diligence for purposes of § 1024.41(b)(1) includes, without limitation, the following actions:

i. A servicer requires additional information from the applicant, such as an address or a telephone number to verify employment; the servicer contacts the applicant promptly to obtain such information after receiving a loss mitigation application;

ii. Servicing for a mortgage loan is transferred to a servicer and the borrower makes an incomplete loss mitigation application to the transferee servicer after the transfer; the transferee servicer reviews documents provided by the transferor servicer to determine if information required to make the loss mitigation application complete is contained within documents transferred by the transferor servicer to the servicer; and

iii. A servicer offers a borrower a short-term payment forbearance program or a short-term repayment plan based on an evaluation of an incomplete loss mitigation application and provides the borrower the written notice pursuant to § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii). If the borrower remains in compliance with the short-term payment forbearance program or short-term repayment plan, and the borrower does not request further assistance, the servicer may suspend reasonable diligence efforts until near the end of the payment forbearance program or repayment plan. However, if the borrower fails to comply with the program or plan or requests further assistance, the servicer must immediately resume reasonable diligence efforts. Near the end of a short-term payment forbearance program offered based on an evaluation of an incomplete loss mitigation application pursuant to § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii), and prior to the end of the forbearance period, if the borrower remains delinquent, a servicer must contact the borrower to determine if the borrower wishes to complete the loss mitigation application and proceed with a full loss mitigation evaluation.

5. Information not in the borrower's control. A loss mitigation application is complete when a borrower provides all information required from the borrower notwithstanding that additional information may be required by a servicer that is not in the control of a borrower. For example, if a servicer requires a consumer report for a loss mitigation evaluation, a loss mitigation application is considered complete if a borrower has submitted all information required from the borrower without regard to whether a servicer has obtained a consumer report that a servicer has requested from a consumer reporting agency.

41(b)(2)Review of loss mitigation application submission.

41(b)(2)(i) Requirements.

1. Foreclosure sale not scheduled. For purposes of § 1024.41(b)(2)(i), if no foreclosure sale has been scheduled as of the date a servicer receives a loss mitigation application, the servicer must treat the application as having been received 45 days or more before any foreclosure sale.

Paragraph 41(b)(2)(i)(B).

1. Later discovery of additional information required to evaluate application. Even if a servicer has informed a borrower that an application is complete (or notified the borrower of specific information necessary to complete an incomplete application), if the servicer determines, in the course of evaluating the loss mitigation application submitted by the borrower, that additional information or a corrected version of a previously submitted document is required, the servicer must promptly request the additional information or corrected document from the borrower pursuant to the reasonable diligence obligation in § 1024.41(b)(1). See § 1024.41(c)(2)(iv) addressing facially complete applications.

41(b)(2)(ii) Time period disclosure.

1. Thirty days is generally reasonable. In general and subject to the restrictions described in comments 41(b)(2)(ii)-2 and -3, a servicer complies with the requirement to include a reasonable date in the written notice required under § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B) by including a date that is 30 days after the date the servicer provides the written notice.

2. No later than the next milestone. For purposes of § 1024.41(b)(2)(ii), subject to the restriction described in comment 41(b)(2)(ii)-3, the reasonable date must be no later than the earliest of:

i. The date by which any document or information submitted by a borrower will be considered stale or invalid pursuant to any requirements applicable to any loss mitigation option available to the borrower;

ii. The date that is the 120th day of the borrower's delinquency;

iii. The date that is 90 days before a foreclosure sale;

iv. The date that is 38 days before a foreclosure sale.

3. Seven-day minimum. A reasonable date for purposes of § 1024.41(b)(2)(ii) must never be less than seven days from the date on which the servicer provides the written notice pursuant to § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B).

41(b)(3) Determining Protections.

1. Foreclosure sale not scheduled. If no foreclosure sale has been scheduled as of the date that a complete loss mitigation application is received, the application is considered to have been received more than 90 days before any foreclosure sale.

2. Foreclosure sale re-scheduled. The protections under § 1024.41 that have been determined to apply to a borrower pursuant to § 1024.41(b)(3) remain in effect thereafter, even if a foreclosure sale is later scheduled or rescheduled.

41(c) Evaluation of loss mitigation applications.

41(c)(1) Complete loss mitigation application.

1. Definition of “evaluation.” The conduct of a servicer's evaluation with respect to any loss mitigation option is in the sole discretion of a servicer. A servicer meets the requirements of § 1024.41(c)(1)(i) if the servicer makes a determination regarding the borrower's eligibility for a loss mitigation program. Consistent with § 1024.41(a), because nothing in section 1024.41 should be construed to permit a borrower to enforce the terms of any agreement between a servicer and the owner or assignee of a mortgage loan, including with respect to the evaluation for, or provision of, any loss mitigation option, § 1024.41(c)(1) does not require that an evaluation meet any standard other than the discretion of the servicer.

2. Loss mitigation options available to a borrower. The loss mitigation options available to a borrower are those options offered by an owner or assignee of the borrower's mortgage loan. Loss mitigation options administered by a servicer for an owner or assignee of a mortgage loan other than the owner or assignee of the borrower's mortgage loan are not available to the borrower solely because such options are administered by the servicer. For example:

i. A servicer services mortgage loans for two different owners or assignees of mortgage loans. Those entities each have different loss mitigation programs. loss mitigation options not offered by the owner or assignee of the borrower's mortgage loan are not available to the borrower; or

ii. The owner or assignee of a borrower's mortgage loan has established pilot programs, temporary programs, or programs that are limited by the number of participating borrowers. Such loss mitigation options are available to a borrower. However, a servicer evaluates whether a borrower is eligible for any such program consistent with criteria established by an owner or assignee of a mortgage loan. For example, if an owner or assignee has limited a pilot program to a certain geographic area or to a limited number of participants, and the servicer determines that a borrower is not eligible based on any such requirement, the servicer shall inform the borrower that the investor requirement for the program is the basis for the denial.

3. Offer of a non-home retention option. A servicer's offer of a non-home retention option may be conditional upon receipt of further information not in the borrower's possession and necessary to establish the parameters of a servicer's offer. For example, a servicer complies with the requirement for evaluating the borrower for a short sale option if the servicer offers the borrower the opportunity to enter into a listing or marketing period agreement but indicates that specifics of an acceptable short sale transaction may be subject to further information obtained from an appraisal or title search.

4. Other notices. A servicer may combine other notices required by applicable law, including, without limitation, a notice with respect to an adverse action required by Regulation B, 12 CFR part 1002, or a notice required pursuant to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, with the notice required pursuant to § 1024.41(c)(1), unless otherwise prohibited by applicable law.

41(c)(2) Incomplete loss mitigation application evaluation.

41(c)(2)(i) In general.

1. Offer of a loss mitigation option without an evaluation of a loss mitigation application. Nothing in § 1024.41(c)(2)(i) prohibits a servicer from offering loss mitigation options to a borrower who has not submitted a loss mitigation application. Further, nothing in § 1024.41(c)(2)(i) prohibits a servicer from offering a loss mitigation option to a borrower who has submitted an incomplete loss mitigation application where the offer of the loss mitigation option is not based on any evaluation of information submitted by the borrower in connection with such loss mitigation application. For example, if a servicer offers trial loan modification programs to all borrowers who become 150 days delinquent without an application or consideration of any information provided by a borrower in connection with a loss mitigation application, the servicer's offer of any such program does not violate § 1024.41(c)(2)(i), and a servicer is not required to comply with § 1024.41 with respect to any such program, because the offer of the loss mitigation option is not based on an evaluation of a loss mitigation application.

2. Servicer discretion. Although a review of a borrower's incomplete loss mitigation application is within a servicer's discretion, and is not required by § 1024.41, a servicer may be required separately, in accordance with policies and procedures maintained pursuant to § 1024.38(b)(2)(v), to properly evaluate a borrower who submits an application for a loss mitigation option for all loss mitigation options available to the borrower pursuant to any requirements established by the owner or assignee of the borrower's mortgage loan. Such evaluation may be subject to requirements applicable to loss mitigation applications otherwise considered incomplete pursuant to § 1024.41.

41(c)(2)(ii) Reasonable time.

1. Significant period of time. A significant period of time under the circumstances may include consideration of the timing of the foreclosure process. For example, if a borrower is less than 50 days before a foreclosure sale, an application remaining incomplete for 15 days may be a more significant period of time under the circumstances than if the borrower is still less than 120 days delinquent on a mortgage loan obligation.

41(c)(2)(iii) Short-term loss mitigation options.

1. Short-term payment forbearance program. The exemption in § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii) applies to, among other things, short-term payment forbearance programs. For purposes of § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii), a payment forbearance program is a loss mitigation option pursuant to which a servicer allows a borrower to forgo making certain payments or portions of payments for a period of time. A short-term payment forbearance program for purposes of § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii) allows the forbearance of payments due over periods of no more than six months. Such a program would be short-term regardless of the amount of time a servicer allows the borrower to make up the missing payments.

2. Short-term loss mitigation options and incomplete applications. Section 1024.41(c)(2)(iii) allows a servicer to offer a borrower a short-term payment forbearance program or a short-term repayment plan based on an evaluation of an incomplete loss mitigation application. The servicer must still comply with the other requirements of § 1024.41 with respect to the incomplete loss mitigation application, including the requirement in § 1024.41(b)(2) to review the application to determine if it is complete, the requirement in § 1024.41(b)(1) to exercise reasonable diligence in obtaining documents and information to complete a loss mitigation application (see comment 41(b)(1)-4.iii), and the requirement in § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B) to provide the borrower with written notice that the servicer acknowledges the receipt of the application and has determined that the application is incomplete.

3. Short-term loss mitigation options and complete applications. Even if a servicer offers a borrower a short-term payment forbearance program or a short-term repayment plan based on an evaluation of an incomplete loss mitigation application, the servicer must still comply with all applicable requirements in § 1024.41 if the borrower completes a loss mitigation application.

4. Short-term repayment plan. The exemption in § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii) applies to, among other things, short-term repayment plans. For purposes of § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii), a repayment plan is a loss mitigation option with terms under which a borrower would repay all past due payments over a specified period of time to bring the mortgage loan account current. A short-term repayment plan for purposes of § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii) allows for the repayment of no more than three months of past due payments and allows a borrower to repay the arrearage over a period lasting no more than six months.

5. Specific payment terms and duration. i. General requirement. Section 1024.41(c)(2)(iii) requires a servicer to provide the borrower a written notice stating, among other things, the specific payment terms and duration of a short-term payment forbearance program or a short-term repayment plan offered based on an evaluation of an incomplete application. Generally, a servicer complies with these requirements if the written notice states the amount of each payment due during the program or plan, the date by which the borrower must make each payment, and whether the mortgage loan will be current at the end of the program or plan if the borrower complies with the program or plan.

ii. Disclosure of payment amounts that may change. At the time a servicer provides the written notice pursuant to § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii), if the servicer lacks information necessary to determine the amount of a specific payment due during the program or plan (for example, because the borrower's interest rate will change to an unknown rate based on an index or because an escrow account computation year as defined in § 1024.17(b) will end and the borrower's escrow payment might change), the servicer complies with the requirement to disclose the specific payment terms and duration of a short-term payment forbearance program or short-term repayment plan if the disclosures are based on the best information reasonably available to the servicer at the time the notice is provided and the written notice identifies which payment amounts may change, states that such payment amounts are estimates, and states the general reason that such payment amounts might change. For example, if an escrow account computation year as defined in § 1024.17(b) will end during a borrower's short-term repayment plan, the written notice complies with § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii) if it identifies the payment amounts that may change, states that those payment amounts are estimates, and states that the affected payments might change because the borrower's escrow payment might change.

6. Timing of notice. Generally, a servicer acts promptly to provide the written notice required by § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii) if the servicer provides such written notice no later than five days (excluding legal public holidays, Saturdays, and Sundays) after offering the borrower a short-term payment forbearance program or short-term repayment plan. A servicer may provide the written notice at the same time the servicer offers the borrower the program or plan. A written offer that contains all the required elements of the written notice also satisfies § 1024.41(c)(2)(iii).

41(c)(2)(iv) Facially complete application.

1. Reasonable opportunity. Section 1024.41(c)(2)(iv) requires a servicer to treat a facially complete application as complete for the purposes of paragraphs (f)(2) and (g) until the borrower has been given a reasonable opportunity to complete the application. A reasonable opportunity requires the servicer to notify the borrower of what additional information or corrected documents are required, and to afford the borrower sufficient time to gather the information and documentation necessary to complete the application and submit it to the servicer. The amount of time that is sufficient for this purpose will depend on the facts and circumstances.

2. Borrower fails to complete the application. If the borrower fails to complete the application within the timeframe provided under § 1024.41(c)(2)(iv), the application shall be considered incomplete.

41(c)(3) Notice of complete application.

Paragraph 41(c)(3)(i).

1. Completion date. A servicer complies with § 1024.41(c)(3)(i)(B) by disclosing on the notice the most recent date the servicer received the complete loss mitigation application. For example, assume that a borrower first submits a complete loss mitigation application on March 1. The servicer must disclose March 1 as the date the servicer received the application under § 1024.41(c)(3)(i)(B). Assume the servicer discovers on March 10 that it requires additional information or corrected documents to complete the application and promptly requests such additional information or documents from the borrower pursuant to § 1024.41(c)(2)(iv). If the borrower subsequently completes the application on March 21, the servicer must provide another notice in accordance with § 1024.41(c)(3)(i) and disclose March 21 as the date the servicer received the complete application. See comment 41(c)(3)(i)-3.

2. First notice or filing. Section 1024.41(c)(3)(i)(D)(1) and (2) sets forth different requirements depending on whether the servicer has made the first notice or filing under applicable law for any judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process at the time the borrower submits a complete loss mitigation application. See comment 41(f)-1 for a description of whether a document is considered the first notice or filing under applicable law.

3. Additional notices. Except as provided in § 1024.41(c)(3)(ii), § 1024.41(c)(3)(i) requires a servicer to provide a written notice every time a loss mitigation application becomes complete. For example, assume that a borrower first submits a complete loss mitigation application on March 1, and the servicer provides the notice under § 1024.41(c)(3)(i). Assume the servicer discovers on March 10 that it requires additional information or corrected documents regarding a source of income that the borrower previously identified. The servicer must promptly request such additional information or documents from the borrower pursuant to § 1024.41(c)(2)(iv). If the borrower subsequently completes the application on March 21, the servicer must provide another notice in accordance with § 1024.41(c)(3)(i), unless an exception applies under § 1024.41(c)(3)(ii). See comment 41(c)(3)(i)-1.

41(c)(4) Information not in the borrower's control.

41(c)(4)(i) Diligence requirements.

1. During the first 30 days following receipt of a complete loss mitigation application. Section 1024.41(c)(4)(i) requires a servicer to act with reasonable diligence to obtain documents or information not in the borrower's control, which includes information in the servicer's control, that the servicer requires to determine which loss mitigation options, if any, it will offer to the borrower. At a minimum and without limitation, a servicer must request such documents or information from the appropriate party:

i. Promptly upon determining that the servicer requires the documents or information to determine which loss mitigation options, if any, the servicer will offer the borrower; and

ii. By a date that will enable the servicer to complete the evaluation within 30 days of receiving the complete loss mitigation application, as set forth in § 1024.41(c)(1), to the extent practicable.

2. More than 30 days following receipt of a complete loss mitigation application. If a servicer has not, within 30 days of receiving a complete loss mitigation application, received the required documents or information from a party other than the borrower or the servicer, the servicer acts with reasonable diligence pursuant to § 1024.41(c)(4)(i) by heightening efforts to obtain the documents or information promptly, to minimize delay in making a determination of which loss mitigation options, if any, it will offer to the borrower. Such heightened efforts include, for example, promptly verifying that it has contacted the appropriate party and determining whether it should obtain the required documents or information from a different party.

41(c)(4)(ii) Effect in case of delay.

1. Third-party delay. Notwithstanding delay in receiving required documents or information from any party other than the borrower or the servicer, § 1024.41(c)(1)(i) requires a servicer to complete all possible steps in the process of evaluating a complete loss mitigation application within 30 days of receiving the complete loss mitigation application. Such steps may include requirements imposed on the servicer by third parties, such as mortgage insurance companies, guarantors, owners, or assignees. For example, if a servicer can determine a borrower's eligibility for all available loss mitigation options based on an evaluation of the borrower's complete loss mitigation application subject only to approval from the mortgage insurance company, § 1024.41(c)(1)(i) requires the servicer to do so within 30 days of receiving the complete loss mitigation application notwithstanding the need to obtain such approval before offering the borrower any loss mitigation options.

2. Offers not prohibited. Section 1024.41(c)(4)(ii)(A)(2) permits a servicer to deny a complete loss mitigation application (in accordance with applicable investor requirements) if, after exercising reasonable diligence to obtain the required documents or information from a party other than the borrower or the servicer, the servicer has been unable to obtain such documents or information for a significant period of time and the servicer cannot complete its determination without the required documents or information. Section 1024.41(c)(4)(ii)(A)(2) does not require a servicer to deny a complete loss mitigation application and permits a servicer to offer a borrower a loss mitigation option, even if the servicer does not obtain the requested documents or information.

41(d) Denial of loan modification options.

1. Investor requirements. If a trial or permanent loan modification option is denied because of a requirement of an owner or assignee of a mortgage loan, the specific reasons in the notice provided to the borrower must identify the owner or assignee of the mortgage loan and the requirement that is the basis of the denial. A statement that the denial of a loan modification option is based on an investor requirement, without additional information specifically identifying the relevant investor or guarantor and the specific applicable requirement, is insufficient. However, where an owner or assignee has established an evaluation criteria that sets an order ranking for evaluation of loan modification options (commonly known as a waterfall) and a borrower has qualified for a particular loan modification option in the ranking established by the owner or assignee, it is sufficient for the servicer to inform the borrower, with respect to other loan modification options ranked below any such option offered to a borrower, that the investor's requirements include the use of such a ranking and that an offer of a loan modification option necessarily results in a denial for any other loan modification options below the option for which the borrower is eligible in the ranking.

2. Net present value calculation. If a trial or permanent loan modification is denied because of a net present value calculation, the specific reasons in the notice provided to the borrower must include the inputs used in the net present value calculation.

3. Determination not to offer a loan modification option constitutes a denial. A servicer's determination not to offer a borrower a loan modification available to the borrower constitutes a denial of the borrower for that loan modification option, notwithstanding whether a servicer offers a borrower a different loan modification option or other loss mitigation option.

4. Reasons listed. A servicer is required to disclose the actual reason or reasons for the denial. If a servicer's systems establish a hierarchy of eligibility criteria and reach the first criterion that causes a denial but do not evaluate the borrower based on additional criteria, a servicer complies with the rule by providing only the reason or reasons with respect to which the borrower was actually evaluated and rejected as well as notification that the borrower was not evaluated on other criteria. A servicer is not required to determine or disclose whether a borrower would have been denied on the basis of additional criteria if such criteria were not actually considered.

41(f) Prohibition on foreclosure referral.

1. Prohibited activities. Section 1024.41(f) prohibits a servicer from making the first notice or filing required by applicable law for any judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process under certain circumstances. Whether a document is considered the first notice or filing is determined on the basis of foreclosure procedure under the applicable State law.

i. Where foreclosure procedure requires a court action or proceeding, a document is considered the first notice or filing if it is the earliest document required to be filed with a court or other judicial body to commence the action or proceeding (e.g., a complaint, petition, order to docket, or notice of hearing).

ii. Where foreclosure procedure does not require an action or court proceeding, such as under a power of sale, a document is considered the first notice or filing if it is the earliest document required to be recorded or published to initiate the foreclosure process.

iii. Where foreclosure procedure does not require any court filing or proceeding, and also does not require any document to be recorded or published, a document is considered the first notice or filing if it is the earliest document that establishes, sets, or schedules a date for the foreclosure sale.

iv. A document provided to the borrower but not initially required to be filed, recorded, or published is not considered the first notice or filing on the sole basis that the document must later be included as an attachment accompanying another document that is required to be filed, recorded, or published to carry out a foreclosure.

41(g) Prohibition on foreclosure sale.

1. Dispositive motion. The prohibition on a servicer moving for judgment or order of sale includes making a dispositive motion for foreclosure judgment, such as a motion for default judgment, judgment on the pleadings, or summary judgment, which may directly result in a judgment of foreclosure or order of sale. A servicer that has made any such motion before receiving a complete loss mitigation application has not moved for a foreclosure judgment or order of sale if the servicer takes reasonable steps to avoid a ruling on such motion or issuance of such order prior to completing the procedures required by § 1024.41, notwithstanding whether any such action successfully avoids a ruling on a dispositive motion or issuance of an order of sale.

2. Proceeding with the foreclosure process. Nothing in § 1024.41(g) prevents a servicer from proceeding with the foreclosure process, including any publication, arbitration, or mediation requirements established by applicable law, when the first notice or filing for a foreclosure proceeding occurred before a servicer receives a complete loss mitigation application so long as any such steps in the foreclosure process do not cause or directly result in the issuance of a foreclosure judgment or order of sale, or the conduct of a foreclosure sale, in violation of § 1024.41.

3. Interaction with foreclosure counsel. The prohibitions in § 1024.41(g) against moving for judgment or order of sale or conducting a sale may require a servicer to act through foreclosure counsel retained by the servicer in a foreclosure proceeding. If a servicer has received a complete loss mitigation application, the servicer must instruct counsel promptly not to make a dispositive motion for foreclosure judgment or order of sale; where such a dispositive motion is pending, to avoid a ruling on the motion or issuance of an order of sale; and, where a sale is scheduled, to prevent conduct of a foreclosure sale, unless one of the conditions in § 1024.41(g)(1) through (3) is met. A servicer is not relieved of its obligations because foreclosure counsel's actions or inaction caused a violation.

4. Loss mitigation applications submitted 37 days or less before foreclosure sale. Although a servicer is not required to comply with the requirements in § 1024.41 with respect to a loss mitigation application submitted 37 days or less before a foreclosure sale, a servicer is required separately, in accordance with policies and procedures maintained pursuant to § 1024.38(b)(2)(v) to properly evaluate a borrower who submits an application for a loss mitigation option for all loss mitigation options available to the borrower pursuant to any requirements established by the owner or assignee of the borrower's mortgage loan. Such evaluation may be subject to requirements applicable to a review of a loss mitigation application submitted by a borrower 37 days or less before a foreclosure sale.

5. Conducting a sale prohibited. Section 1024.41(g) prohibits a servicer from conducting a foreclosure sale, even if a person other than the servicer administers or conducts the foreclosure sale proceedings. Where a foreclosure sale is scheduled, and none of the conditions under § 1024.41(g)(1) through (3) are applicable, conduct of the sale violates § 1024.41(g).

Paragraph 41(g)(3).

1. Short sale listing period. An agreement for a short sale transaction, or other similar loss mitigation option, typically includes marketing or listing periods during which a servicer will allow a borrower to market a short sale transaction. A borrower is deemed to be performing under an agreement on a short sale, or other similar loss mitigation option, during the term of a marketing or listing period.

2. Short sale agreement. If a borrower has not obtained an approved short sale transaction at the end of any marketing or listing period, a servicer may determine that a borrower has failed to perform under an agreement on a loss mitigation option. An approved short sale transaction is a short sale transaction that has been approved by all relevant parties, including the servicer, other affected lienholders, or insurers, if applicable, and the servicer has received proof of funds or financing, unless circumstances otherwise indicate that an approved short sale transaction is not likely to occur.

41(h) Appeal process.

Paragraph 41(h)(3).

1. Supervisory personnel. The appeal may be evaluated by supervisory personnel that are responsible for oversight of the personnel that conducted the initial evaluation, as long as the supervisory personnel were not directly involved in the initial evaluation of the borrower's complete loss mitigation application.

41(i) Duplicative requests.

1. Applicability of loss mitigation protections. Under § 1024.41(i), a servicer must comply with § 1024.41 with respect to a loss mitigation application unless the servicer has previously done so for a complete loss mitigation application submitted by the borrower and the borrower has been delinquent at all times since submitting the prior complete application. Thus, for example, if the borrower has previously submitted a complete loss mitigation application and the servicer complied fully with § 1024.41 for that application, but the borrower then ceased to be delinquent and later became delinquent again, the servicer again must comply with § 1024.41 for any subsequent loss mitigation application submitted by the borrower. When a servicer is required to comply with the requirements of § 1024.41 for such a subsequent loss mitigation application, the servicer must comply with all applicable requirements of § 1024.41. For example, in such a case, the servicer's provision of the notice of determination of which loss mitigation options, if any, it will offer to the borrower under § 1024.41(c)(1)(ii) regarding the borrower's prior complete loss mitigation application does not affect the servicer's obligations to provide a new notice of complete application under § 1024.41(c)(3)(i) regarding the borrower's subsequent complete loss mitigation application.

2. Servicing transfers. Section 1024.41(i) provides that a servicer need not comply with § 1024.41 for a subsequent loss mitigation application from a borrower where certain conditions are met. A transferee servicer and a transferor servicer, however, are not the same servicer. Accordingly, a transferee servicer is required to comply with the applicable requirements of § 1024.41 upon receipt of a loss mitigation application from a borrower whose servicing the transferee servicer has obtained through a servicing transfer, even if the borrower previously received an evaluation of a complete loss mitigation application from the transferor servicer.

41(k) Servicing transfers.

1. Pending loss mitigation application. For purposes of § 1024.41(k), a loss mitigation application is pending if it was subject to § 1024.41 and had not been fully resolved before the transfer date. For example, a loss mitigation application would not be considered pending if a transferor servicer had denied a borrower for all options and the borrower's time for making an appeal, if any, had expired prior to the transfer date, such that the transferor servicer had no continuing obligations under § 1024.41 with respect to the application. A pending application is considered a pending complete application if it was complete as of the transfer date under the transferor servicer's criteria for evaluating loss mitigation applications.

41(k)(1) In general.

41(k)(1)(i) Timing of compliance.

1. Obtaining loss mitigation documents and information. i. In connection with a transfer, a transferor servicer must timely transfer, and a transferee servicer must obtain from the transferor servicer, documents and information submitted by a borrower in connection with a loss mitigation application, consistent with policies and procedures adopted pursuant to § 1024.38(b)(4). A transferee servicer must comply with the applicable requirements of § 1024.41 with respect to a loss mitigation application received as a result of a transfer, even if the transferor servicer was not required to comply with § 1024.41 with respect to that application (for example, because § 1024.41(i) precluded applicability of § 1024.41 with respect to the transferor servicer). If an application was not subject to § 1024.41 prior to a transfer, then for purposes of § 1024.41(b) and (c), a transferee servicer is considered to have received the loss mitigation application on the transfer date. Any such application is subject to the timeframes for compliance set forth in § 1024.41(k).

ii. A transferee servicer must, in accordance with § 1024.41(b)(1), exercise reasonable diligence to complete a loss mitigation application, including a facially complete application, received as a result of a transfer. In the transfer context, reasonable diligence includes ensuring that a borrower is informed of any changes to the application process, such as a change in the address to which the borrower should submit documents and information to complete the application, as well as ensuring that the borrower is informed about which documents and information are necessary to complete the application.

iii. A borrower may provide documents and information necessary to complete an application to a transferor servicer after the transfer date. Consistent with policies and procedures maintained pursuant to § 1024.38(b)(4), the transferor servicer must timely transfer, and the transferee servicer must obtain, such documents and information.

2. Determination of rights and protections. For purposes of § 1024.41(c) through (h), a transferee servicer must consider documents and information that constitute a complete loss mitigation application for the transferee servicer to have been received as of the date such documents and information were received by the transferor servicer, even if such documents and information were received by the transferor servicer after the transfer date. See comment 41(k)(1)(i)-1.iii. An application that was facially complete under § 1024.41(c)(2)(iv) with respect to the transferor servicer remains facially complete under § 1024.41(c)(2)(iv) with respect to the transferee servicer as of the date it was facially complete with respect to the transferor servicer. If an application was complete with respect to the transferor servicer, but is not complete with respect to the transferee servicer, the transferee servicer must treat the application as facially complete under § 1024.41(c)(2)(iv) as of the date the application was complete with respect to the transferor servicer.

3. Duplicative notices not required. A transferee servicer is not required to provide notices under § 1024.41 with respect to a particular loss mitigation application that the transferor servicer provided prior to the transfer. For example, if the transferor servicer provided the notice required by § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B) prior to the transfer, the transferee servicer is not required to provide the notice again for that application.

41(k)(1)(ii) Transfer date defined.

1. Transfer date. Section 1024.41(k)(1)(ii) provides that the transfer date is the date on which the transferee servicer will begin accepting payments relating to the mortgage loan, as disclosed on the notice of transfer of loan servicing pursuant to § 1024.33(b)(4)(iv). The transfer date is the same date as that on which the transfer of the servicing responsibilities from the transferor servicer to the transferee servicer occurs. The transfer date is not necessarily the same date as either the effective date of the transfer of servicing as disclosed on the notice of transfer of loan servicing pursuant to § 1024.33(b)(4)(i) or the sale date identified in a servicing transfer agreement.

41(k)(2) Acknowledgment notices.

41(k)(2)(ii) Prohibitions.

1. Examples of prohibitions. Section 1024.41(k)(2)(ii)(A) and (B) adjusts the timeframes for certain borrower rights and foreclosure protections where § 1024.41(k)(2)(i) applies. These provisions are illustrated as follows: Assume a transferor servicer receives a borrower's initial loss mitigation application on October 1, and the loan is transferred five days (excluding legal public holidays, Saturdays, or Sundays) later, on October 8. Assume that Columbus Day, a legal public holiday, occurs on October 14, and the transferee servicer provides the notice required by § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B) 10 days (excluding legal public holidays, Saturdays, or Sundays) after the transfer date, on October 23. Assume the transferee servicer discloses a 30-day reasonable date, November 22, under § 1024.41(b)(2)(ii).

i. If the transferor servicer receives the borrower's initial loss mitigation application when the borrower's mortgage loan is 101 days delinquent, the borrower's mortgage loan would be 123 days delinquent on October 23, the date the transferee servicer provides the notice required by § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B). Pursuant to § 1024.41(k)(2)(ii)(A), the transferee servicer cannot make the first notice or filing required by applicable law for any judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process until after November 22, the reasonable date disclosed under § 1024.41(b)(2)(ii), and then only if the borrower has not submitted a complete application by that date.

ii. If the transferor servicer receives the borrower's initial loss mitigation application 55 days before the foreclosure sale, the date that the transferee servicer provides the notice required by § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B), October 23, is 33 days before the foreclosure sale. Pursuant to § 1024.41(k)(2)(ii)(B), the transferee servicer must comply with § 1024.41(c), (d), and (g) if the borrower submits a complete loss mitigation application on or before November 22, the reasonable date disclosed under § 1024.41(b)(2)(ii).

2. Applicability of loss mitigation provisions. Section 1024.41(k)(2)(ii)(A) prohibits a servicer from making the first notice or filing required by applicable law for any judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process until a date that is after the reasonable date disclosed to the borrower pursuant to § 1024.41(b)(2)(ii), notwithstanding § 1024.41(f)(1). Section 1024.41(k)(2)(ii)(B) requires a servicer to comply with § 1024.41(c), (d), and (g) if a borrower submits a complete loss mitigation application on or before the reasonable date disclosed in the notice required by § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B), even if the servicer would otherwise not be required to comply with § 1024.41(c), (d), and (g) because the application is submitted 37 days or fewer before a foreclosure sale. Section 1024.41(k)(2)(ii) provides additional protections for borrowers but does not remove any protections. Servicers remain subject to the requirements of § 1024.41 as applicable and so, for example, must comply with § 1024.41(h) if the servicer receives a complete loss mitigation application 90 days or more before a foreclosure sale. Similarly, a servicer is prohibited from making the first notice or filing before the borrower's mortgage loan obligation is more than 120 days delinquent, even if that is after the reasonable date disclosed to the borrower pursuant to § 1024.41(b)(2)(ii).

3. Reasonable date when no milestones remain. Generally, a servicer does not provide the notice required under § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B) after the date that is 38 days before a foreclosure sale, so at least one milestone specified in comment 41(b)(ii)-1 always remains applicable. When § 1024.41(k)(2)(i) applies, however, the transferee servicer may sometimes provide the notice after the date that is 38 days before a foreclosure sale. When this occurs, the transferee servicer must determine the reasonable date when none of the four specified milestones remain. The other requirements of § 1024.41(b)(2)(ii) continue to apply. In this circumstance, a reasonable date may occur less than 30 days, but not less than seven days, after the date the transferee servicer provides the written notice pursuant to § 1024.41(b)(2)(i)(B).

41(k)(3) Complete loss mitigation applications pending at transfer.

1. Additional information or corrections to a previously submitted document. If a transferee servicer acquires the servicing of a mortgage loan for which a complete loss mitigation application is pending as of the transfer date and the transferee servicer determines that additional information or a correction to a previously submitted document is required based upon its criteria for evaluating loss mitigation applications, the application is considered facially complete under § 1024.41(c)(2)(iv) as of the date it was first facially complete or complete, as applicable, with respect to the transferor servicer. Once the transferee servicer receives the information or corrections necessary to complete the application, § 1024.41(c)(3) requires the transferee servicer to provide a notice of complete application.

2. Applications first complete upon transfer. If the borrower's loss mitigation application was incomplete based on the transferor servicer's criteria prior to transfer but is complete based upon the transferee servicer's criteria, the application is considered a pending loss mitigation application complete as of the transfer date for purposes of § 1024.41(k)(3). Consequently, the transferee servicer must comply with the applicable requirements of § 1024.41(c)(1) and (4) within 30 days of the transfer date. For purposes of § 1024.41(c) through (h), the application is complete as of the date the transferor servicer received the documents and information constituting the complete application. See comment 41(k)(1)(i)-2. In such circumstances, § 1024.41(c)(3) requires the transferee servicer to provide a notice of complete application that discloses the date the transferor servicer received the documents and information constituting the complete application.

41(k)(4) Applications subject to appeal process.

1. Obtaining appeal. A borrower may submit an appeal of a transferor servicer's determination pursuant to § 1024.41(h) to the transferor servicer after the transfer date. Consistent with policies and procedures maintained pursuant to § 1024.38(b)(4), the transferor servicer must timely transfer, and the transferee servicer must obtain, documents and information regarding such appeals.

2. Servicer unable to determine appeal. A transferee servicer may be unable to make a determination on an appeal when, for example, the transferor servicer denied a borrower for a loan modification option that the transferee servicer does not offer or when the transferee servicer receives the mortgage loan through an involuntary transfer and the transferor servicer failed to maintain proper records such that the transferee servicer lacks sufficient information to review the appeal. In that circumstance, the transferee servicer is required to treat the appeal as a pending complete application, and it must permit the borrower to accept or reject any loss mitigation options offered by the transferor servicer, even if it does not offer the loss mitigation options offered by the transferor servicer, in addition to the loss mitigation options, if any, that the transferee servicer determines to offer the borrower based on its own evaluation of the borrower's complete loss mitigation application. For example, assume a transferor servicer denied a borrower for all loan modification options but offered the borrower a short sale option, and assume that the borrower's appeal of the loan modification denial was pending as of the transfer date. If the transferee servicer is unable to determine the borrower's appeal, the transferee servicer must evaluate the borrower for all available loss mitigation options in accordance with § 1024.41(c) and (k)(3). At the conclusion of such evaluation, the transferee servicer must permit the borrower to accept the short sale option offered by the transferor servicer, even if the transferee servicer does not offer the short sale option, in addition to any loss mitigation options the transferee servicer determines to offer the borrower based upon its own evaluation.

41(k)(5) Pending loss mitigation offers.

1. Obtaining evidence of borrower acceptance. A borrower may provide an acceptance or rejection of a pending loss mitigation offer to a transferor servicer after the transfer date. Consistent with policies and procedures maintained pursuant to § 1024.38(b)(4), the transferor servicer must timely transfer, and the transferee servicer must obtain, documents and information regarding such acceptances and rejections, and the transferee servicer must provide the borrower with any timely accepted loss mitigation option, even if the borrower submitted the acceptance to the transferor servicer.