Skip to main content

Help for homeowners and renters during the coronavirus national emergency

Find help for your situation

Take action if you're in forbearance

Learn what to do whether you just entered forbearance, need more time or are ready to exit.

Get help if you're a renter

Take action to protect yourself against eviction.

Where to get additional help

If you need help working with your servicer or understanding your options you may want to reach out to a professional to help you with your specific situation. Remember: Legitimate resources will not charge an up-front fee for their services.

Housing counselors

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-approved housing counselors can discuss options with you if you're having trouble paying your mortgage or managing your reverse mortgage.

Need help with the basics?

Learn how to read your monthly mortgage statement or understand key mortgage terms, like mortgage forbearance.

Lawyers

If you need a lawyer, there may be resources to assist you through your local bar association, legal aid, or if you are a servicemember, your local Legal Assistance Office .

Credit counselors

Reputable credit counseling organizations are generally non-profit organizations that can advise you on your money and debts, and help you with a budget. Some may also help you negotiate with creditors.

Avoiding scams and bad actors

Beware of coronavirus-related scams

See more information on scams related to the coronavirus

Learn what steps you can take if you believe you’ve been a victim of a foreclosure scam

Submit a complaint

If you have a problem with a consumer financial product or service, you can try reaching out to the company first. Companies can usually answer questions unique to your situation and more specific to the products and services they offer. We can also help you connect with the company if you have a complaint. You can submit to the CFPB online or by calling (855) 411-2372.

For homeowners: Start a complaint

For renters: See more about filing a complaint about discrimination or against a landlord

Housing discrimination

Two federal laws prohibit housing discrimination. The protections they offer differ somewhat depending on whether you own or rent your home.

If you own your home, lenders and servicers may not discriminate against you for mortgage servicing practices – such as forbearance and loan modifications – based on your race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, age, family status, disability, whether you are receiving money from a public assistance program, or whether you are exercising your rights under certain consumer protection laws. If you believe a lender or mortgage servicer has discriminated against you, you generally can submit a complaint with the CFPB or file a fair housing complaint with HUD . More information on fair lending and protections against discrimination can be found on the CFPB’s and HUD’s websites.

If you are renting a home or apartment, your landlord is prohibited from changing or setting different terms and conditions for your rental – or from terminating your tenancy – based on your race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status, or disability. If you believe your rights have been violated you can file a fair housing complaint with HUD .

Page last modified: March 25, 2021