Skip to main content

Your financial well-being score

We never collect or store answers to the financial well-being questionnaire.

If you would like to see your score and answers on the page below, please start with the questionnaire and enter your responses.

Your financial well-being score is calculated based on the answers you gave.

Review your score and your answers below and think about whether you want to take action and make improvements. Our tools and resources can help. You can return and retake the questionnaire to see if you are able to answer the questions differently next time.

Your result

Chart showing that financial well-being scores below 40 are in the lowest of five ranges. Scores between 40 and 50 are in the second lowest. Scores between 50 and 60 are in the middle range. Scores between 60 and 70 are in the second highest range. Scores above 70 are in the highest range.
U.S. average: 54
  1. 40
  2. 50
  3. 60
  4. 70
Financial well-being score

Your score is based on the answers to the financial well-being questionnaire. If you’d like to be able to answer the questions differently next time, see our suggestions and next steps.

What would you like to do next?

If you have a sense of the top money challenges or goals you’d like to work on, you can get started on your own.

Take control of day-to-day money management

Get on track for your financial future

Get personalized help

If you’re looking for a more thorough financial assessment and personalized advice, free and low-cost services may be available. Here are a few ways to get help:

  • A nonprofit credit counselor can help you set up a reasonable repayment plan for credit cards and other consumer debt. See tips for choosing a credit counselor.
  • A HUD-certified housing counselor can give advice if you’re having trouble paying your mortgage or help you get ready for homeownership. Find one in your area.
  • A financial coach can assess your situation and work with you over time to resolve issues and get ahead. Find out about the CFPB coaching initiative.
  • Your local library can often connect you with organizations and people in your area.

See how your score compares to group averages

We never collect or store answers to the financial well-being questionnaire.

If you would like to see your score and answers on the page below, please start with the questionnaire and enter your responses.

Compare by

U.S. average
54
18-24 year olds
51
25-34 year olds
51
35-44 year olds
52
45-54 year olds
54
55-64 year olds
55
65-74 year olds
61
75+ year olds
60
Self-employed
54
Full-time or part-time
54
Homemaker
54
Student
51
Sick or disabled
44
Unemployed or laid off
45
Retired
60
Less than $20,000
46
$20,000 to 29,999
49
$30,000 to 49,999
51
$50,000 to 74,999
55
$75,000 to 99,999
56
$100,000 and higher
60
Source:
Financial Well-Being in America report | Download CSV file
Date published:
September 26, 2017