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Comment for 1026.37 - Content of Disclosures for Certain Mortgage Transactions (Loan Estimate)

1. Disclosures not applicable. The disclosures required by § 1026.37 are required to reflect the terms of the legal obligation between the parties, and if any information necessary for an accurate disclosure is unknown to the creditor, the creditor shall make the disclosure in good faith, based on the best information reasonably available to the creditor pursuant to §§ 1026.17(c) and 1026.19(e). See comments 17(c)(1)-1, 17(c)(2)(i)-1 and -2, and 19(e)(1)(i)-1. Where a disclosure is not applicable to a particular transaction, unless otherwise provided by § 1026.37, form H-24 of appendix H to this part may not be modified to delete the disclosure from form H-24, or to state “not applicable” or “N/A” in place of such disclosure. The portion of the form pertaining to the inapplicable disclosure may be left blank, unless otherwise provided by § 1026.37. For example, in a transaction for which the consumer does not pay points to the creditor to reduce the interest rate, the amounts required to be disclosed by § 1026.37(f)(1)(i) may be left blank on form H-24. As provided in § 1026.37(i) and (j), however, the adjustable payment and adjustable interest rate tables required by those paragraphs may be included only if those disclosures are applicable to the transaction and otherwise must be excluded.

2. Format. See § 1026.37(o) and its commentary for guidance on the proper format to be used in making the disclosures, as well as permissible modifications.

37(a) General information.

37(a)(3) Creditor.

1. Multiple creditors. For transactions with multiple creditors, see § 1026.17(d) and comment 17(d)-1 for further guidance. The creditor making the disclosures, however, must be identified as the creditor for purposes of § 1026.37(a)(3).

2. Mortgage broker as loan originator. In transactions involving a mortgage broker, the name and address of the creditor must be disclosed, if known, even if the mortgage broker provides the disclosures to the consumer under § 1026.19(e)(1)(ii). As required by § 1026.19(e)(1)(i), the mortgage broker must make a good faith effort to disclose the name and address of the creditor, but if the name of the creditor is not yet known, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(3) may be left blank. See comment 37-1.

37(a)(4) Date issued.

1. Applicable date. Section 1026.37(a)(4) requires disclosure of the date the creditor mails or delivers the Loan Estimate to the consumer. The creditor's method of delivery does not affect the date issued. For example, if the creditor hand delivers the Loan Estimate to the consumer on August 14, or if the creditor places the Loan Estimate in the mail on August 14, the date disclosed under § 1026.37(a)(4) is August 14.

2. Mortgage broker as loan originator. In transactions involving a mortgage broker, the date disclosed is the date the mortgage broker mails or delivers the Loan Estimate to the consumer, because pursuant to § 1026.19(e)(1)(ii), the mortgage broker is required to comply with all relevant requirements of § 1026.19(e).

37(a)(5) Applicants.

1. Multiple consumers. If there is more than one consumer applying for the credit, § 1026.37(a)(5) requires disclosure of the name and the mailing address of each consumer to whom the Loan Estimate will be delivered. If the names and mailing addresses of all consumers applying for the credit do not fit in the space allocated on the Loan Estimate, an additional page with that information may be appended to the end of the form. For additional information on permissible changes, see § 1026.37(o)(5) and its commentary.

37(a)(6) Property.

1. Alternate property address. Section 1026.37(a)(6) requires disclosure of the address including the zip code of the property that secures or will secure the transaction. A creditor complies with § 1026.37(a)(6) by disclosing a complete address for purposes of the U.S. Postal Service. If the address is unavailable, a creditor complies with § 1026.37(a)(6) by disclosing the location of such property including a zip code, which is required in all instances. Location of the property under § 1026.37(a)(6) includes location information, such as a lot number. The disclosure of multiple zip codes is permitted if the consumer is investigating home purchase opportunities in multiple zip codes.

2. Personal property. Where personal property also secures the credit transaction, a description of that property may be disclosed, at the creditor's option pursuant to § 1026.37(a)(6), if a description fits in the space provided on form H-24 for the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(6). An additional page may not be appended to the form to disclose a description of personal property.

3. Multiple properties. Where more than one property secures the credit transaction, § 1026.37(a)(6) requires disclosure of all properties. If the addresses of all properties securing the transaction do not fit in the space allocated on the Loan Estimate, an additional page with that information with respect to real properties may be appended to the end of the form.

37(a)(7) Sale price.

1. Estimated property value. In transactions where there is no seller, such as in a refinancing, § 1026.37(a)(7)(ii) requires the creditor to disclose the estimated value of the property identified in § 1026.37(a)(6) based on the best information reasonably available to the creditor at the time the disclosure is provided to the consumer, which may include, at the creditor's option, the estimated value of the improvements to be made on the property in transactions involving construction. The creditor may use the estimate provided by the consumer at application unless it has performed its own estimate of the property value by the time the disclosure is provided to the consumer, in which case the creditor must use its own estimate. If the creditor has obtained any appraisals or valuations of the property for the application at the time the disclosure is issued to the consumer, the value determined by the appraisal or valuation to be used during underwriting for the application is disclosed as the estimated property value. If the creditor has obtained multiple appraisals or valuations and has not yet determined which one will be used during underwriting, it may disclose the value from any appraisal or valuation it reasonably believes it may use in underwriting the transaction. In a transaction that involves a seller, if the sale price is not yet known, the creditor complies with § 1026.37(a)(7) if it discloses the estimated value of the property that it used as the basis for the disclosures in the Loan Estimate.

2. Personal property. In transactions involving personal property that is separately valued from real property, only the value of the real property or cooperative unit is disclosed under § 1026.37(a)(7). Where personal property is included in the sale price of the real property or cooperative unit (for example, if the consumer is purchasing the furniture inside the dwelling), however, § 1026.37(a)(7) permits disclosure of the aggregate price without any reduction for the appraised or estimated value of the personal property.

37(a)(8) Loan term.

1. Partial years.

i. Terms to maturity of 24 months or more. Section 1026.37(a)(8) requires disclosure of the term to maturity in years, or months, or both, as applicable. Where the term exceeds 24 months and equals a whole number of years, a creditor complies with § 1026.37(a)(8) by disclosing the number of years, followed by the designation “years.” Where the term exceeds 24 months but does not equal a whole number of years, a creditor complies with § 1026.37(a)(8) by disclosing the term to maturity as the number of years followed by the designation “yr.” and the remaining number of months, followed by the designation “mo.” For example, if the term to maturity of the transaction is 185 months, the correct disclosure would be “15 yr. 5 mo.”

ii. Terms to maturity of less than 24 months. If the term to maturity is less than 24 months and does not equal a whole number of years, a creditor complies with § 1026.37(a)(8) by disclosing the number of months only, followed by the designation “mo.” For example, if the term to maturity of a transaction is six months or 16 months, it would be disclosed as “6 mo.” or “16 mo.,” respectively. If the term to maturity is 12 months, however it would be disclosed simply as “1 year.”

2. Adjustable loan term. Section 1026.37(a)(8) requires disclosure of the term to maturity of the credit transaction. If the term to maturity is adjustable, i.e., it is not known with certainty at consummation, the creditor complies with § 1026.37(a)(8), if it discloses the possible range of the loan term, including the maximum number of years possible under the terms of the legal obligation. For example, if the loan term depends on the value of interest rate adjustments during the term of the loan, to calculate the maximum loan term, the creditor assumes that the interest rate rises as rapidly as possible after consummation, taking into account the terms of the legal obligation, including any applicable caps on interest rate adjustments and lifetime interest rate cap.

3. Loan term start date. See comment app. D-7.i for an explanation of how a creditor discloses the loan term of a multiple-advance loan to finance the construction of a dwelling that may be permanently financed by the same creditor.

37(a)(9) Purpose.

1. General. Section 1026.37(a)(9) requires disclosure of the consumer's intended use of the credit. In ascertaining the consumer's intended use, § 1026.37(a)(9) requires the creditor to consider all relevant information known to the creditor at the time of the disclosure. If the purpose is not known, the creditor may rely on the consumer's stated purpose. The following examples illustrate when each of the permissible purposes should be disclosed:

i. Purchase. The consumer intends to use the proceeds from the transaction to purchase the property that will secure the extension of credit. In a purchase transaction with simultaneous subordinate financing, the simultaneous subordinate loan is also disclosed with the purpose “Purchase.”

ii. Refinance. The consumer refinances an existing obligation already secured by the consumer's dwelling to change the rate, term, or other loan features and may or may not receive cash from the transaction. For example, in a refinance with no cash provided, the new amount financed does not exceed the unpaid principal balance, any earned unpaid finance charge on the existing debt, and amounts attributed solely to the costs of the refinancing. Conversely, in a refinance with cash provided, the consumer refinances an existing mortgage obligation and receives money from the transaction that is in addition to the funds used to pay the unpaid principal balance, any earned unpaid finance charge on the existing debt, and amounts attributed solely to the costs of the refinancing. In such a transaction, the consumer may, for example, use the newly-extended credit to pay off the balance of the existing mortgage and other consumer debt, such as a credit card balance.

iii. Construction. Section 1026.37(a)(9)(iii) requires the creditor to disclose that the loan is for construction in transactions where the creditor extends credit to finance only the cost of initial construction (construction-only loan), not renovations to existing dwellings, and in transactions where a multiple advance loan may be permanently financed by the same creditor (construction-permanent loan). In a construction-only loan, the borrower may be required to make interest-only payments during the loan term with the balance commonly due at the end of the construction project. For additional guidance on disclosing construction-permanent loans, see § 1026.17(c)(6)(ii), comments 17(c)(6)-2, -3, and -5, and appendix D to this part.

iv. Home equity loan. The creditor is required to disclose that the credit is for a “home equity loan” if the creditor intends to extend credit for any purpose other than a purchase, refinancing, or construction. This disclosure applies whether the loan is secured by a first or subordinate lien.

2. Refinance coverage. The disclosure requirements under § 1026.37(a)(9)(ii) apply to credit transactions that meet the definition of a refinancing under § 1026.20(a) but without regard to whether they are made by a creditor, holder, or servicer of the existing obligation. Section 1026.20(a) applies only to refinancings undertaken by the original creditor or a holder or servicer of the original debt. See comment 20(a)-5.

37(a)(10) Product.

1. No features. If the loan product disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(a)(10) does not include any of the features described in § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii), only the product type and introductory and first adjustment periods, if applicable, are disclosed. For example:

i. Adjustable rate. When disclosing an adjustable rate product, the disclosure of the loan product must be preceded by the length of the introductory period and the frequency of the first adjustment period thereafter. Thus, for example, if the loan product is an adjustable rate with an introductory rate that is fixed for the first five years of the loan term and then adjusts every three years starting in year six, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(10) is “5/3 Adjustable Rate.” If the first adjustment period is not the period for all adjustments under the terms of the legal obligation, the creditor should still disclose the initial adjustment period and should not disclose other adjustment periods. For example, if the loan product is an adjustable rate with an introductory rate that is fixed for the first five years of the loan term and then adjusts every three years starting in year six, and then annually starting in year fifteen, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(10) would still be “5/3 Adjustable Rate.”

A. No introductory period. If the loan product is an adjustable rate with no introductory rate, the creditor should disclose “0” where the introductory rate period would ordinarily be disclosed. For example, if the loan product is an adjustable rate that adjusts every three years with no introductory period, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(10) is “0/3 Adjustable Rate.”

B. Introductory period not yet known. If the loan product is an adjustable rate with an introductory period that is not yet known at the time of delivery of the Loan Estimate, the creditor should disclose the shortest potential introductory period for the particular loan product offered. For example, if the loan product is an adjustable rate with an introductory period that may be between 36 and 48 months and the rate would then adjust every year, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(10) is “3/1 Adjustable Rate.”

ii. Step rate. If the loan product is a step rate with an introductory interest rate that lasts for ten years and adjusts every year thereafter for the next five years, and then adjusts every three years for the next 15 years, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(10) is “10/1 Step Rate.” If the loan product is a step rate with no introductory rate, the creditor should disclose “0” where the introductory rate period would ordinarily be disclosed.

iii. Fixed rate. If the loan product is not an adjustable rate or a step rate, as described in § 1026.37(a)(10)(i)(A) and (B), even if an additional feature described in § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii) may change the consumer's periodic payment, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(10)(i) is “Fixed Rate.”

2. Additional features. When disclosing a loan product with at least one of the features described in § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii), § 1026.37(a)(10)(iii) and (iv) require the disclosure of only the first applicable feature in the order of § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii) and that it be preceded by the time period or the length of the introductory period and the frequency of the first adjustment period, as applicable, followed by a description of the loan product and its time period as provided for in § 1026.37(a)(10)(i). For example:

i. Negative amortization. Some loan products, such as “payment option” loans, permit the borrower to make payments that are insufficient to cover all of the interest accrued, and the unpaid interest is added to the principal balance. Where the loan product includes a loan feature that may cause the loan balance to increase, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii)(A) is preceded by the time period that the borrower is permitted to make payments that result in negative amortization (e.g., “2 Year Negative Amortization”), followed by the loan product type. Thus, a fixed rate product with a step-payment feature for the first two years of the legal obligation that may negatively amortize is disclosed as “2 Year Negative Amortization, Fixed Rate.”

ii. Interest only. When disclosing an “Interest Only” feature, as defined in § 1026.18(s)(7)(iv), the applicable time period must precede the label “Interest Only.” Thus, a fixed rate loan with only interest due for the first five years of the loan term is disclosed as “5 Year Interest Only, Fixed Rate.” If the interest only feature fails to cover the total interest due, then, as required by § 1026.37(a)(10)(iii), the disclosure must reference the negative amortization feature and not the interest only feature (e.g., “5 Year Negative Amortization, Fixed Rate”). See comment app. D-7.ii for an explanation of the disclosure of the time period of an interest only feature for a construction loan or a construction-permanent loan.

iii. Step payment. When disclosing a step payment feature (which is sometimes referred to instead as a graduated payment), the period of time at the end of which the scheduled payments will change must precede the label “Step Payment” (e.g., “5 Year Step Payment”) followed by the name of the loan product. Thus, a fixed rate mortgage subject to a 5-year step payment plan is disclosed as a “5 Year Step Payment, Fixed Rate.”

iv. Balloon payment. If a loan product includes a “balloon payment,” as that term is defined in § 1026.37(b)(5), the disclosure of the balloon payment feature, including the year the payment is due, precedes the disclosure of the loan product. Thus, if the loan product is a step rate with an introductory rate that lasts for three years and adjusts each year thereafter until the balloon payment is due in the seventh year of the loan term, the disclosure required is “Year 7 Balloon Payment, 3/1 Step Rate.” If the loan product includes more than one balloon payment, only the earliest year that a balloon payment is due shall be disclosed.

v. Seasonal payment. If a loan product includes a seasonal payment feature, § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii)(E) requires that the creditor disclose the feature. The feature is not, however, required to be disclosed with any preceding time period. Disclosure of the label “Seasonal Payment” without any preceding number of years satisfies this requirement.

3. Periods not in whole years.

i. Terms of 24 months or more. For product types and features that have introductory periods or adjustment periods that do not equate to a number of whole years, if the period is a number of months that is 24 or greater and does not equate to a whole number of years, § 1026.37(a)(10) requires disclosure of the whole number of years followed by a decimal point with the remaining months rounded to two places. For example, if the loan product is an adjustable rate with an introductory period of 30 months that adjusts every year thereafter, the creditor would be required to disclose “2.5/1 Adjustable Rate.” If the introductory period were 31 months, the required disclosure would be 2.58/1 Adjustable Rate.”

ii. Terms of less than 24 months. For product types and features that have introductory periods or adjustment periods that do not equate to a number of whole years, if the period is less than 24 months, § 1026.37(a)(10) requires disclosure of the number of months, followed by the designation “mo.” For example, if the product type is an adjustable rate with an 18-month introductory period that adjusts every 18 months starting in the 19th month, the required disclosure would be “18 mo./18mo. Adjustable Rate.”

iii. Adjustments more frequent than monthly. For adjustment periods that change more frequently than monthly, § 1026.37(a)(10) requires disclosure of the applicable unit-period, such as daily, weekly, or bi-weekly. For example, for an adjustable rate construction loan with no introductory fixed rate period where the interest rate adjusts every seven days, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(10) is “0/Weekly Adjustable Rate.”

37(a)(11) Loan type.

1. Other. If the transaction is a type other than a conventional, FHA, or VA loan, § 1026.37(a)(11)(iv) requires the creditor to disclose the loan type as “Other” and provide a name or brief description of the loan type. For example, a loan that is guaranteed or funded by the Federal government under the Rural Housing Service (RHS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture is required to be disclosed under the subcategory “Other.” Section 1026.37(a)(11)(iv) requires a brief description of the loan type (e.g., “RHS”). A loan that is insured or guaranteed by a State agency must also be disclosed as “Other.”

37(a)(12) Loan identification number (Loan ID # ).

1. Unique identifier. Section 1026.37(a)(12) requires that the creditor disclose a loan identification number that may be used by the creditor, consumer, and other parties to identify the transaction, labeled as “Loan ID # .” The loan identification number is determined by the creditor, which number may contain any alpha-numeric characters. Because the number must allow for the identification of the particular credit transaction under § 1026.37(a)(12), a creditor must use a unique loan identification number, i.e., the creditor may not use the same loan identification number for different, but related, loan transactions (such as different loans to the same borrower). Where a creditor issues a revised Loan Estimate for a transaction, the loan identification number must be sufficient to enable identification of the transaction pursuant to § 1026.37(a)(12).

37(a)(13) Rate lock.

1. Interest rate. For purposes of § 1026.37(a)(13), the interest rate is locked for a specific period of time if the creditor has agreed to extend credit to the consumer at a given rate, subject to contingencies that are described in any rate lock agreement between the creditor and consumer.

2. Expiration date. The disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(13)(ii) related to estimated closing costs is required regardless of whether the interest rate is locked for a specific period of time or whether the terms and costs are otherwise accepted or extended. If the consumer fails to indicate an intent to proceed with the transaction within 10 business days after the disclosures were originally provided under § 1026.19(e)(1)(iii) (or within any longer time period established by the creditor), then, for determining good faith under § 1026.19(e)(3)(i) and (ii), a creditor may use a revised estimate of a charge instead of the amount originally disclosed under § 1026.19(e)(1)(i). See comment 19(e)(3)(iv)(E)-2.

3. Time zone. The disclosure required by § 1026.37(a)(13) requires the applicable time zone for all times provided, as determined by the creditor. For example, if the creditor is located in New York and determines that the Loan Estimate will expire at 5:00 p.m. in the time zone applicable to its location, while standard time is in effect, the disclosure must include a reference to the Eastern time zone (i.e., 5:00 p.m. EST).

4. Revised disclosures. Once the consumer indicates an intent to proceed within the time specified by the creditor under § 1026.37(a)(13)(ii), the date and time at which estimated closing costs expire are left blank on any subsequent revised disclosures. The creditor may extend the period of availability to expire beyond the time disclosed under § 1026.37(a)(13)(ii). If the consumer indicates an intent to proceed within that longer time period, the date and time at which estimated closing costs expire are left blank on subsequent revised disclosures, if any. See comment 19(e)(3)(iv)-5.

37(b) Loan terms.

1. Legal obligation. The disclosures required by § 1026.37 must reflect good faith estimates of the credit terms to which the parties will be legally bound for the transaction. Accordingly, if certain terms of the transaction are known or reasonably available to the creditor, based on information such as the consumer's selection of a product type or other information in the consumer's application, § 1026.37 requires the creditor to disclose those credit terms. For example, if the consumer selects a product type with a prepayment penalty, § 1026.37(b)(4) requires disclosure of the maximum amount of the prepayment penalty and period in which the prepayment penalty may be charged as known to the creditor at the time the disclosures are provided.

37(b)(2) Interest rate.

1. Interest rate at consummation not known. Where the interest rate that will apply at consummation is not known at the time the creditor must deliver the disclosures required by § 1026.19(e), § 1026.37(b)(2) requires disclosure of the fully-indexed rate, defined as the index plus the margin at consummation. Although § 1026.37(b)(2) refers to the index plus margin “at consummation,” if the index value that will be in effect at consummation is unknown at the time the disclosures are provided under § 1026.19(e)(1)(iii), i.e., within three business days after receipt of a consumer's application, the fully-indexed rate disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(2) may be based on the index in effect at the time the disclosure is delivered. The index in effect at consummation (or the time the disclosure is delivered under § 1026.19(e)) need not be used if the contract provides for a delay in the implementation of changes in an index value. For example, if the contract specifies that rate changes are based on the index value in effect 45 days before the change date, creditors may use any index value in effect during the 45 days before consummation (or any earlier date of disclosure) in calculating the fully-indexed rate to be disclosed. See comment app. D-7.iii for an explanation of the disclosure of the permanent financing interest rate for a construction-permanent loan.

37(b)(3) Principal and interest payment.

1. Frequency of principal and interest payment. Pursuant to § 1026.37(o)(5)(i), if the contract provides for a unit-period, as defined in appendix J to this part, of a month, such as a monthly payment schedule, the payment disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(3) should be labeled “Monthly Principal & Interest.” If the contract requires bi-weekly payments of principal or interest, the payment should be labeled “Bi-Weekly Principal & Interest.” If a creditor voluntarily permits a payment schedule not provided for in the contract, such as an informal principal-reduction arrangement, the disclosure should reflect only the payment frequency provided for in the contract. See § 1026.17(c)(1).

2. Initial periodic payment if not known. Under § 1026.37(b)(3), the initial periodic payment amount that will be due under the terms of the legal obligation must be disclosed. If the initial periodic payment is not known because it will be based on an interest rate at consummation that is not known at the time the disclosures required by § 1026.19(e) must be provided, for example, if it is based on an external index that may fluctuate before consummation, § 1026.37(b)(3) requires that the disclosure be based on the fully-indexed rate disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(2). See comment 37(b)(2)-1 for guidance regarding calculating the fully-indexed rate.

37(b)(4) Prepayment penalty.

1. Transaction includes a prepayment penalty. Section 1026.37(b)(4) requires disclosure of a statement of whether the transaction includes a prepayment penalty. If the transaction includes a prepayment penalty, § 1026.37(b)(7) sets forth the information that must be disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(4) (i.e., the maximum amount of the prepayment penalty that may be imposed under the terms of the loan contract and the date on which the penalty will no longer be imposed). For an example of such disclosure, see form H-24 of appendix H to this part. The disclosure under § 1026.37(b)(4) applies to transactions where the terms of the loan contract provide for a prepayment penalty, even though the creditor does not know at the time of the disclosure whether the consumer will, in fact, make a payment to the creditor that would cause imposition of the penalty. For example, if the monthly interest accrual amortization method described in comment 37(b)(4)-2.i is used such that interest is assessed on the balance for a full month even if the consumer makes a full prepayment before the end of the month, the transaction includes a prepayment penalty that must be disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(b)(4).

2. Examples of prepayment penalties. For purposes of § 1026.37(b)(4), the following are examples of prepayment penalties:

i. A charge determined by treating the loan balance as outstanding for a period of time after prepayment in full and applying the interest rate to such “balance,” even if the charge results from interest accrual amortization used for other payments in the transaction under the terms of the loan contract. “Interest accrual amortization” refers to the method by which the amount of interest due for each period (e.g., month) in a transaction's term is determined. For example, “monthly interest accrual amortization” treats each payment as made on the scheduled, monthly due date even if it is actually paid early or late (until the expiration of any grace period). Thus, under the terms of a loan contract providing for monthly interest accrual amortization, if the amount of interest due on May 1 for the preceding month of April is $3,000, the loan contract will require payment of $3,000 in interest for the month of April whether the payment is made on April 20, on May 1, or on May 10. In this example, if the consumer prepays the loan in full on April 20 and if the accrued interest as of that date is $2,000, then assessment of a charge of $3,000 constitutes a prepayment penalty of $1,000 because the amount of interest actually earned through April 20 is only $2,000.

ii. A fee, such as an origination or other loan closing cost, that is waived by the creditor on the condition that the consumer does not prepay the loan. See comment 37(b)(4)-3.iii below for additional guidance regarding waived bona fide third-party charges imposed by the creditor if the consumer pays all of a covered transaction's principal before the date on which the principal is due sooner than 36 months after consummation.

iii. A minimum finance charge in a simple interest transaction.

iv. Computing a refund of unearned interest by a method that is less favorable to the consumer than the actuarial method, as defined by section 933(d) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992, 15 U.S.C. 1615(d). For purposes of computing a refund of unearned interest, if using the actuarial method defined by applicable State law results in a refund that is greater than the refund calculated by using the method described in section 933(d) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992, creditors should use the State law definition in determining if a refund is a prepayment penalty.

3. Fees that are not prepayment penalties. For purposes of § 1026.37(b)(4), fees that are not prepayment penalties include, for example:

i. Fees imposed for preparing and providing documents when a loan is paid in full, if such fees are imposed whether or not the loan is prepaid. Examples include a loan payoff statement, a reconveyance document, or another document releasing the creditor's security interest in the dwelling that secures the loan.

ii. Loan guarantee fees.

iii. A waived bona fide third-party charge imposed by the creditor if the consumer pays all of a covered transaction's principal before the date on which the principal is due sooner than 36 months after consummation. For example, assume that at consummation, the creditor waives $3,000 in closing costs to cover bona fide third-party charges but the terms of the loan agreement provide that the creditor may recoup the $3,000 in waived charges if the consumer repays the entire loan balance sooner than 36 months after consummation. The $3,000 charge is not a prepayment penalty. In contrast, for example, assume that at consummation, the creditor waives $3,000 in closing costs to cover bona fide third-party charges but the terms of the loan agreement provide that the creditor may recoup $4,500 in part to recoup waived charges, if the consumer repays the entire loan balance sooner than 36 months after consummation. The $3,000 that the creditor may impose to cover the waived bona fide third-party charges is not a prepayment penalty, but the additional $1,500 charge is a prepayment penalty and must be disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(b)(4).

4. Rebate of finance charge. For an obligation that includes a finance charge that does not take into account each reduction in the principal balance of the obligation, the disclosure under § 1026.37(b)(4) reflects whether or not the consumer is entitled to a rebate of any finance charge if the obligation is prepaid in full or part. Finance charges that do not take into account each reduction in the principal balance of an obligation may include precomputed finance charges. If any portion of an unearned precomputed finance charge will not be provided as a rebate upon full prepayment, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(b)(4) will be an affirmative answer, indicate the maximum amount of such precomputed finance charge that may not be provided as a rebate to the consumer upon any prepayment, and state when the period during which a full rebate would not be provided terminates, as required by § 1026.37(b)(7). If, instead, there will be a full rebate of the precomputed finance charge and no other prepayment penalty imposed on the consumer, to comply with the requirements of § 1026.37(b)(4) and (7), the creditor states a negative answer only. If the transaction involves both a precomputed finance charge and a finance charge computed by application of a rate to an unpaid balance, disclosure about both the entitlement to any rebate of the finance charge upon prepayment and any other prepayment penalty are made as one disclosure under § 1026.37(b)(4), stating one affirmative or negative answer and an aggregated amount and time period for the information required by § 1026.37(b)(7). For example, if in such a transaction, a portion of the precomputed finance charge will not be provided as a rebate and the loan contract also provides for a prepayment penalty based on the amount prepaid, both disclosures are made under § 1026.37(b)(4) as one aggregate amount, stating the maximum amount and time period under § 1026.37(b)(7). If the transaction instead provides a rebate of the precomputed finance charge upon prepayment, but imposes a prepayment penalty based on the amount prepaid, to comply with § 1026.37(b)(4), the creditor states an affirmative answer and the information about the prepayment penalty, as required by § 1026.37(b)(7). For further guidance and examples of these types of charges, see comment 18(k)(2)-1. For analogous guidance, see comment 18(k)-2. For further guidance on prepaid finance charges generally, see comment 18(k)-3.

5. Additional guidance. For additional guidance generally on disclosure of prepayment penalties, see comment 18(k)-1.

37(b)(5) Balloon payment.

1. Regular periodic payment. If a payment is not itself a regular periodic payment and is more than two times any one regular periodic payment during the loan term, then it is disclosed as a balloon payment under § 1026.37(b)(5). The regular periodic payments used to determine whether a payment is a balloon payment under § 1026.37(b)(5) are the payments of principal and interest (or interest only, depending on the loan features) specified under the terms of the loan contract that are due from the consumer for two or more unit-periods in succession. All regular periodic payments during the loan term are used to determine whether a particular payment is a balloon payment, regardless of whether the regular periodic payments have changed during the loan term due to rate adjustments or other payment changes permitted or required under the loan contract.

i. For example, assume that, under a 15-year step rate mortgage, the loan contract provides for scheduled monthly payments of $300 each during the years one through three and scheduled monthly payments of $700 each during years four through 15. If an irregular payment of $1,000 is scheduled during the final month of year 15, that payment is disclosed as a balloon payment under § 1026.37(b)(5), because it is more than two times the regular periodic payment amount of $300 during years one through three. This is the case even though the irregular payment is not more than two times the regular periodic payment of $700 per month during years four through fifteen. The $700 monthly payments during years four through fifteen are not balloon payments even though they are more than two times the regular periodic payments during years one through three, because they are regular periodic payments.

ii. If the loan has an adjustable rate under which the regular periodic payments may increase after consummation, but the amounts of such payment increases (if any) are unknown at the time of consummation, then the regular periodic payments are based on the fully-indexed rate, except as otherwise determined by any premium or discounted rates, the application of any interest rate adjustment caps, or any other known, scheduled rates under the terms specified in the loan contract. For analogous guidance, see comments 17(c)(1)-8 and -10. Similarly, if a loan has an adjustable interest rate which does not adjust the regular periodic payment but would, if the rate increased, increase only the final payment, the amount of the final payment for purposes of the balloon payment determination is based on the fully-indexed rate, except as otherwise determined by any premium or discounted rate caps, or any other known, scheduled rates under the terms specified in the loan contract. For example, assume that, under a 30-year adjustable rate mortgage, (1) the loan contract requires monthly payments of $300 during years one through five, (2) the loan contract permits interest rate increases every three years starting in the sixth year up to the fully-indexed rate, subject to caps on interest rate adjustments specified in the loan contract, (3) based on the application of the interest rate adjustment caps, the interest rate may increase to the fully-indexed rate starting in year nine, and (4) the monthly payment based on the fully-indexed rate is $700. The regular periodic payments during years one through five are $300 per month, because they are known and scheduled. The regular periodic payments during years six through eight are up to $700 per month, based on the fully-indexed rate but subject to the application of interest rate adjustment caps specified under the loan contract. The regular periodic payments during years nine through thirty are $700, based on the fully-indexed rate. Therefore, if an irregular payment of $1,000 is scheduled during the final month of year 30, that payment is disclosed as a balloon payment under § 1026.37(b)(5), because it is more than two times the regular periodic payment amount of $300 during years one through five. This is the case even though the irregular payment is not more than two times the regular periodic payment during years nine through thirty (i.e., based on the fully-indexed rate). However, the regular periodic payments during years six through thirty themselves are not balloon payments, even though they may be more than two times the regular periodic payments during years one through five.

iii. For a loan with a negative amortization feature, the regular periodic payment does not take into account the possibility that the consumer may exercise an option to make a payment greater than the scheduled periodic payment specified under the terms of the loan contract, if any.

iv. A final payment that differs from other regular periodic payments because of rounding to account for payment amounts including fractions of cents is still a regular periodic payment and need not be disclosed as a balloon payment under § 1026.37(b)(5).

v. The disclosure of balloon payments in the “Projected Payments” table under § 1026.37(c) is governed by that section and its commentary, rather than § 1026.37(b)(5), except that the determination, as a threshold matter, of whether a payment disclosed under § 1026.37(c) is a balloon payment is made in accordance with § 1026.37(b)(5) and its commentary.

2. Single and double payment transactions. The definition of a “balloon payment” under § 1026.37(b)(5) includes the payments under transactions that require only one or two payments during the loan term, even though a single payment transaction does not require regular periodic payments, and a transaction with only two scheduled payments during the loan term may not require regular periodic payments.

37(b)(6) Adjustments after consummation.

1. Periods not in whole years. For guidance on how to disclose increases after consummation that occur after a number of months less than 24 but that do not equate to a number of whole years or within a number of days less than a week, see the guidance provided in comment 37(a)(10)-3. For increases that occur after more than 24 months, see the guidance provided in comment 37(b)(8)-1.

37(b)(6)(i) Adjustment in loan amount.

1. Additional information regarding adjustment in loan amount. A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(6)(i) to disclose additional information indicating whether the maximum principal balance is potential or is scheduled to occur under the terms of the legal obligation by using the phrase “Can go as high as” or “Goes as high as,” respectively. A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(6)(i) to disclose additional information indicating the due date of the last payment that may cause the principal balance to increase by using the phrase “Increases until.” See form H-24 of appendix H to this part for the required format of such phrases, which is required for federally related mortgage loans under § 1026.37(o)(3).

37(b)(6)(ii) Adjustment in interest rate.

1. Additional information regarding adjustment in interest rate. A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(6)(ii) to disclose additional information indicating the frequency of adjustments to the interest rate and date when the interest rate may first adjust by using the phrases “Adjusts every” and “starting in.” A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(6)(ii) to disclose additional information indicating the maximum interest rate, and the first date when the interest rate can reach the maximum interest rate using the phrase “Can go as high as” and then indicating the date at the end of that phrase or for a scheduled maximum interest rate under a step rate loan, “Goes as high as.” If the loan term may increase based on an interest rate adjustment, the disclosure shall indicate the maximum possible loan term using the phrase “Can increase loan term to.” See form H-24 of appendix H to this part for the required format of such phrases, which is required for federally related mortgage loans under § 1026.37(o)(3).

2. Interest rates that adjust at multiple intervals. If the terms of the legal obligation provide for more than one adjustment period, § 1026.37(b)(6)(ii) requires disclosure of only the frequency of the first interest rate adjustment. For example, if the interest rate is fixed for five years, then adjusts every two years starting in year six, then adjusts every year starting in year 10, the disclosure required is “Adjusts every 2 years starting in year 6.”

37(b)(6)(iii) Increase in periodic payment.

1. Additional information regarding increase in periodic payment. A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(6)(iii) to disclose additional information indicating the scheduled frequency of adjustments to the periodic principal and interest payment by using the phrases “Adjusts every” and “starting in.” A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(6)(iii) to disclose additional information indicating the maximum possible periodic principal and interest payment, and the date when the periodic principal and interest payment may first equal the maximum principal and interest payment by using the phrase “Can go as high as” and then indicating the date at the end of that phrase or, for a scheduled maximum amount, such as under a step payment loan, “Goes as high as.” A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(6)(iii) to indicate that there is a period during which only interest is required to be paid and the due date of the last periodic payment of such period using the phrase “Includes only interest and no principal until.” See form H-24 of appendix H to this part for the required format of such phrases, which is required for federally related mortgage loans under § 1026.37(o)(3). See comment app. D-7.iv for an explanation of the disclosure of an increase in the periodic payment for a construction or construction-permanent loan.

2. Periodic principal and interest payments that adjust at multiple intervals. If there are multiple periods of adjustment under the terms of the legal obligation, § 1026.37(b)(6)(iii) requires disclosure of the frequency of only the first adjustment to the periodic principal and interest payment, regardless of the basis for the adjustment. Accordingly, where the periodic principal and interest payment may change because of more than one factor and such adjustments are on different schedules, the frequency disclosed is the adjustment of whichever factor adjusts first. For example, where the interest rate for a transaction is fixed until year six and then adjusts every three years but the transaction also has a negative amortization feature that ends in year seven, § 1026.37(b)(6)(iii) requires disclosure that the interest rate will adjust every three years starting in year six because the periodic principal and interest payment adjusts based on the interest rate before it adjusts based on the end of the negative amortization period.

37(b)(7) Details about prepayment penalty and balloon payment.

Paragraph 37(b)(7)(i).

1. Maximum prepayment penalty. Section 1026.37(b)(7)(i) requires disclosure of the maximum amount of the prepayment penalty that may be imposed under the terms of the legal obligation. The creditor complies with § 1026.37(b)(7)(i) when it assumes that the consumer prepays at a time when the prepayment penalty may be charged and that the consumer makes all payments prior to the prepayment on a timely basis and in the amount required by the terms of the legal obligation. The creditor must determine the maximum of each amount used in calculating the prepayment penalty. For example, if a transaction is fully amortizing and the prepayment penalty is two percent of the loan balance at the time of prepayment, the prepayment penalty amount should be determined by using the highest loan balance possible during the period in which the penalty may be imposed. If more than one type of prepayment penalty applies, the creditor must aggregate the maximum amount of each type of prepayment penalty in the maximum penalty disclosed.

2. Additional information regarding prepayment penalty. A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(7)(i) to disclose additional information indicating the maximum amount of the prepayment penalty that may be imposed and the date when the period during which the penalty may be imposed terminates using the phrases “As high as” and “if you pay off the loan during.” See form H-24 of appendix H to this part for the required format of such phrases, which is required for federally related mortgage loans under § 1026.37(o)(3).

Paragraph 37(b)(7)(ii).

1. Additional information regarding balloon payment. A creditor complies with the requirement under § 1026.37(b)(7)(ii) to disclose additional information indicating the maximum amount of the balloon payment and the due date of such payment using the phrases “You will have to pay” and “at the end of.” See form H-24 of appendix H to this part for the required format of such phrases, which is required for federally related mortgage loans under § 1026.37(o)(3). If the transaction includes more than one balloon payment, a creditor complies with § 1026.37(b)(7)(ii) by disclosing the highest of the balloon payments and the due date of that payment.

37(b)(8) Timing.

1. Whole years. For adjustments that occur after a period of whole years, the timing of information required by § 1026.37(b)(8) starts with year number “1,” counting from the date that interest for the first scheduled periodic payment begins to accrue for § 1026.37(b)(8)(i), or from the due date of the first periodic payment for § 1026.37(b)(8)(ii), or from the date of consummation for § 1026.37(b)(8)(iii). For example, an interest rate that is fixed for five years and can first adjust at the beginning of the 61st month from the date that interest for the regularly scheduled periodic payment began to accrue would be disclosed as beginning to adjust in “year 6.” A monthly periodic payment that adjusts starting with the 61st scheduled payment likewise would be disclosed as adjusting in “year 6.”

2. Periods not in whole years. For adjustments that occur after a number of months less than 24 that do not equate to a number of whole years or within a number of days less than a week, see the guidance provided in comment 37(a)(10)-3.

37(c) Projected payments.

1. Definitions. For purposes of § 1026.37(c), the terms “adjustable rate,” “fixed rate,” “negative amortization,” and “interest only” have the meanings in § 1026.37(a)(10).

2. Construction loans. See comment app. D-7.v for an explanation of the projected payments disclosure for a construction or construction-permanent loan.

37(c)(1) Periodic payment or range of payments.

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(i).

1. Periodic payments. For purposes of § 1026.37(c)(1)(i), the periodic payment is the regularly scheduled payment of principal and interest, mortgage insurance premiums, and escrow payments described in § 1026.37(c)(2) without regard to any final payment that differs from other payments because of rounding to account for payment amounts including fractions of cents.

2. Initial periodic payment or range of payments. Section 1026.37(c)(1)(i) requires the creditor to disclose the initial periodic payment or range of payments. The disclosure required is of the actual periodic payment or range of payments that corresponds to the interest rate that will apply at consummation, including any initial discounted or premium interest rate. For examples of discounted and premium rate transactions, see comment 17(c)(1)-10.v. For guidance regarding whether the disclosure should reflect a buydown, see comments 17(c)(1)-3 through -5. If the initial periodic payment or range of payments may vary based on an adjustment to an index value that applies at consummation, § 1026.37(c)(1)(i) requires that the disclosure of the initial periodic payment or range of payments be based on the fully-indexed rate disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(2). See comment 37(b)(2)-1 for guidance regarding calculating the fully-indexed rate.

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(i)(A).

1. Periodic principal and interest payments. For purposes of § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(A), periodic principal and interest payments may change when the interest rate, applicable interest rate caps, required periodic principal and interest payments, or ranges of such payments may change. Minor payment variations resulting solely from the fact that months have different numbers of days are not changes to periodic principal and interest payments.

2. Negative amortization. In a loan that contains a negative amortization feature, periodic principal and interest payments or the range of such payments may change for purposes of § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(A) at the time the negative amortization period ends under the terms of the legal obligation, meaning the consumer must begin making payments that do not result in an increase of the principal balance. The occurrence of an event requiring disclosure of additional separate periodic payments or ranges of payments should be based on the assumption that the consumer will make payments as scheduled or, if applicable, elect to make the periodic payments that would extend the negative amortization period to the latest time permitted under the terms of the legal obligation. The occurrence of all subsequent events requiring disclosure of additional separate periodic payments or ranges of payments should be based on this assumption. The table required by § 1026.37(c) should also reflect any balloon payment that would result from such scheduled payments or election. See § 1026.37(c)(1)(ii)(A) for special rules regarding disclosure of balloon payments.

3. Interest only. In a loan that contains an interest only feature, periodic principal and interest payments may change for purposes of § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(A) when the interest only period ends, meaning the consumer must begin making payments that do not defer repayment of principal.

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(i)(B).

1. Balloon payment. For purposes of § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(B), whether a balloon payment occurs is determined pursuant to § 1026.37(b)(5) and its commentary. For guidance on the amount of a balloon payment disclosed on the table required by § 1026.37(c), see comment 37(c)(2)(i)-3.

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(i)(C).

1. General. “Mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent” means the amounts identified in § 1026.4(b)(5). For purposes of § 1026.37(c), “mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent” includes any mortgage guarantee that provides coverage similar to mortgage insurance (such as a United States Department of Veterans Affairs or United States Department of Agriculture guarantee), even if not technically considered insurance under State or other applicable law. The fees for such a guarantee are included in “mortgage insurance premiums.”

2. Calculation of mortgage insurance termination. For purposes of § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(C), mortgage insurance premiums should be calculated based on the declining principal balance that will occur as a result of changes to the interest rate and payment amounts, applying the interest rates applicable to the transaction. Such calculation should take into account any initial discounted or premium interest rate. For example, for an adjustable rate transaction that has a discounted interest rate during an initial five-year period, the creditor makes the calculation using a composite rate based on the rate in effect during the initial five-year period and, thereafter, the fully-indexed rate, unless otherwise required by applicable law. For guidance on calculation of the amount of mortgage insurance premiums to disclose on the table required by § 1026.37(c), see § 1026.37(c)(2)(ii) and its commentary. See comment 37(b)(2)-1 for guidance regarding calculating the fully-indexed rate.

3. Disclosure of mortgage insurance termination. The table required by § 1026.37(c) should reflect the consumer's mortgage insurance premiums until the date on which the creditor must automatically terminate coverage under applicable law, even though the consumer may have a right to request that the insurance be cancelled earlier. Unlike termination of mortgage insurance, a subsequent decline in the consumer's mortgage insurance premiums is not, by itself, an event that requires the disclosure of additional separate periodic payments or ranges of payments in the table required by § 1026.37(c). For example, some mortgage insurance programs annually adjust premiums based on the declining loan balance. Such annual adjustment to the amount of premiums would not require a separate disclosure of a periodic payment or range payments.

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(i)(D).

1. Anniversary of the due date of initial periodic payment. Section 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(D) provides that the anniversary of the due date of the initial periodic payment or range of payments that immediately follows the occurrence of multiple events described in § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(A) during a single year is an event that requires disclosure of additional periodic payments or ranges of payments. Section 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(A) provides that a potential change in the periodic principal and interest payment is an event requiring disclosure of additional separate periodic payments. See comment 37(c)(1)(iii)(B)-1 for an example of the application of § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(D).

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(ii).

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(ii)(A).

1. Special rule regarding balloon payments that are final payments. Section 1026.37(c)(1)(ii)(A) is an exception to the general rule in § 1026.37(c)(1)(ii), and requires that a balloon payment that is scheduled as a final payment under the terms of the legal obligation is always disclosed as a separate periodic payment or range of payments, in which case the creditor discloses as a single range of payments all events requiring disclosure of additional separate periodic payments or ranges of payments described in § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(A) through (D), other than the final balloon payment, occurring after the second separate periodic payment or range of payments disclosed. Balloon payments that are not scheduled as final payments under the terms of the legal obligation, such as a balloon payment due at the scheduled recast of a loan that permits negative amortization, are disclosed pursuant to the general rule in § 1026.37(c)(1)(ii). A balloon payment that is a final payment is disclosed as a single payment, and not combined with other changes to periodic principal and interest payments and disclosed as a range.

2. Example. Assume a loan with a term of seven years, where the interest rate adjusts each year for the first three years and is fixed thereafter, that provides for a balloon payment as the final payment, where no mortgage insurance is required, and no escrow account will be established for the payment of charges described in § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii). The creditor discloses on the table required by § 1026.37(c) in the first column the initial periodic payment or range of payments, in the second column the periodic payment or range of payments that would apply after the first interest rate adjustment, in the third column the periodic payments or ranges of payments that would apply after the second interest rate adjustment until the final balloon payment (disclosed as a single range of payments), and in the fourth column the final balloon payment. Although the balloon payment that is scheduled as the final payment under the terms of the legal obligation occurs after the third separate periodic payment or range of payments, the creditor discloses the final balloon payment as a separate event requiring disclosure of additional periodic payments or range of payments due to the special rule in § 1026.37(c)(1)(ii)(A).

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(ii)(B).

1. Special rule regarding disclosure of the automatic termination of mortgage insurance. Section 1026.37(c)(1)(ii)(B) is an exception to the general rule in § 1026.37(c)(1)(ii), and requires that the automatic termination of mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent under applicable law is disclosed as a separate periodic payment or range of payments only if the total number of separate periodic payments or ranges of payments otherwise disclosed does not exceed three. This means that the automatic termination of mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent under applicable law is disclosed as its own event only if there is a column in which to disclose it, i.e., there are only three other separate periodic payments or ranges of payments that are required to be disclosed. Where the automatic termination of mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent under applicable law is not disclosed as a separate periodic payment or range of payments, the absence of a required mortgage insurance payment is disclosed with the next disclosed event requiring disclosure of additional separate periodic payments or ranges of payments, as applicable.

2. Examples of special rule regarding disclosure of the automatic termination of mortgage insurance. i. Assume a step-rate loan with a 30-year term with an introductory interest rate that lasts for five years, a different interest rate that applies for the next five-year period, a final interest rate adjustment after 10 years, where mortgage insurance would terminate for purposes of § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(C) in the third year, and where no escrow account would be established for the payment of charges described in § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii). The creditor would disclose on the table required by § 1026.37(c) the initial periodic payment for years one through three (reflecting the principal and interest payment corresponding to the introductory interest rate and payments for mortgage insurance premiums), an additional separate periodic payment for years four and five (reflecting the principal and interest payment corresponding to the introductory rate and no payments for mortgage insurance premiums), an additional separate periodic payment or range of payments for years six through 10 (reflecting the principal and interest payment corresponding to the interest rate that would apply after the introductory rate), and an additional separate periodic payment or range of payments for years 11 through 30 (reflecting the principal and interest payment corresponding to the interest rate that would apply after the second interest rate adjustment until the end of the loan term). In this example, the automatic termination of mortgage insurance would be separately disclosed on the table required by § 1026.37(c) because the total number of separate periodic payments or ranges of payments otherwise disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(1) does not exceed three.

ii. Assume the same loan as above, except that the terms of the legal obligation also provide for a third interest rate adjustment that would occur after 15 years. The creditor would disclose on the table required by § 1026.37(c) the initial periodic payment for years one through five (reflecting the principal and interest payment corresponding to the introductory interest rate and payments for mortgage insurance premiums), an additional separate periodic payment or range of payments for years six through 10 (reflecting the principal and interest payment corresponding to the interest rate that would apply after the first interest rate adjustment and no payments for mortgage insurance premiums), an additional separate periodic payment or range of payments for years 11 through 15 (reflecting the principal and interest payment corresponding to the interest rate that would apply after the second interest rate adjustment), and an additional separate periodic payment or range of payments for years 16 through 30 (reflecting the principal and interest payment corresponding to the interest rate that would apply after the third interest rate adjustment until the end of the loan term). In this example, the automatic termination of mortgage insurance would not be separately disclosed on the table required by § 1026.37(c) because the total number of separate periodic payments or ranges of payments otherwise disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(1) exceeds three. However, the creditor would disclose the termination of mortgage insurance beginning with the periodic payment or range of payments for years six through 10, which is the next disclosed event requiring disclosure of additional separate periodic payments or ranges of payments.

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(iii).

1. Ranges of payments. When a range of payments is required to be disclosed under § 1026.37(c)(1), § 1026.37(c)(1)(iii) requires the creditor to disclose the minimum and maximum amount for both the principal and interest payment under § 1026.37(c)(2)(i) and the total periodic payment under § 1026.37(c)(2)(iv). The amount required to be disclosed for mortgage insurance premiums pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(2)(ii) and the amount payable into an escrow account pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(2)(iii) shall not be disclosed as a range.

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(iii)(B).

1. Multiple events occurring in a single year. If multiple changes to periodic principal and interest payments would result in more than one separate periodic payment or range of payments in a single year, § 1026.37(c)(1)(iii)(B) requires the creditor to disclose the range of payments that would apply during the year in which the events occur. For example:

i. Assume a loan with a 30-year term with a payment that adjusts every month for the first 12 months and is fixed thereafter, where mortgage insurance is not required, and where no escrow account would be established for the payment of charges described in § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii). The creditor discloses as a single range of payments the initial periodic payment and the periodic payment that would apply after each payment adjustment during the first 12 months, which single range represents the minimum payment and maximum payment, respectively. Under § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(D), the creditor also discloses, as an additional separate periodic payment or range of payments, the periodic principal and interest payment or range of payments that would apply after the payment becomes fixed.

ii. Assume instead a loan with a 30-year term with a payment that adjusts upward at three months and at six months and is fixed thereafter, where mortgage insurance is not required, and where no escrow account would be established for the payment of charges described in § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii). The creditor discloses as a single range of payments the initial periodic payment, the periodic payment that would apply after the payment adjustment that occurs at three months, and the periodic payment that would apply after the payment adjustment that occurs at six months, which single range represents the minimum payment and maximum payment, respectively, which would apply during the first year of the loan. Under § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(D), the creditor also discloses as an additional separate periodic payment or range of payments, the principal and interest payment that would apply on the first anniversary of the due date of the initial periodic payment or range of payments, because that is the anniversary that immediately follows the occurrence of the multiple payments or ranges of payments that occurred during the first year of the loan.

iii. Assume that the same loan has a payment that, instead of becoming fixed after the adjustment at six months, adjusts once more at 18 months and becomes fixed thereafter. The creditor discloses the same single range of payments for year one. Under § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(D), the creditor separately discloses the principal and interest payment that would apply on the first anniversary of the due date of the initial periodic payment in year two. Under § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(A) and (c)(3)(ii), beginning in the next year in the sequence (i.e., in year three), the creditor separately discloses the periodic payment that would apply after the payment adjustment that occurs at 18 months. See comment 37(c)(3)(ii)-1 regarding subheadings that state the years.

Paragraph 37(c)(1)(iii)(C).

1. Adjustable rate mortgages. For an adjustable rate loan, the periodic principal and interest payment at each time the interest rate may change will depend on the rate that applies at the time of the adjustment, which is not known at the time the disclosure is provided. As a result, the creditor discloses the minimum and maximum periodic principal and interest payment that could apply during each period disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(1) after the first period.

37(c)(2) Itemization.

Paragraph 37(c)(2)(i).

1. General rule for adjustable rate loans. For an adjustable rate loan, in disclosing the maximum possible payment for principal and interest under § 1026.37(c), the creditor assumes that the interest rate will rise as rapidly as possible after consummation, taking into account the terms of the legal obligation, including any applicable caps on interest rate adjustments and lifetime interest rate cap. For a loan with no lifetime interest rate cap, the maximum rate is determined by reference to other applicable laws, such as State usury law. In disclosing the minimum payment for purposes of § 1026.37(c), the creditor assumes that the interest rate will decrease as rapidly as possible after consummation, taking into account any introductory rates, caps on interest rate adjustments, and lifetime interest rate floor. For an adjustable rate loan based on an index that has no lifetime interest rate floor, the minimum interest rate is equal to the margin.

2. Special rule for adjustable rate loans with negative amortization features. Section 1026.37(c)(2)(i)(B) provides a special rule for calculation of the maximum principal and interest payment in an adjustable rate loan that contains a negative amortization feature. That section provides that the maximum amounts payable for principal and interest after the negative amortization period ends are calculated using the maximum principal amount permitted under the terms of the legal obligation at the end of the negative amortization period. See section § 1026.37(c)(1)(i)(A) and associated commentary for guidance regarding when the negative amortization period ends for purposes of § 1026.37(c)(2). For example, if the maximum principal balance for the last payment in the negative amortization period is achieved at an interest rate that is not the maximum interest rate permitted under the terms of the legal obligation before the negative amortization period ends, future events requiring disclosure of additional, separate periodic payments or ranges of payments assume that the interest rate in effect at the end of the negative amortization period was such interest rate, and not the maximum possible interest rate. After the end of the negative amortization period, the general rule under § 1026.37(c)(2)(i)(A) regarding assumptions of interest rate changes for the maximum principal and interest payment to be disclosed applies from such interest rate. The minimum payment in an adjustable rate loan that contains a negative amortization feature is determined pursuant to the general rule under § 1026.37(c)(2)(i)(A).

3. Disclosure of balloon payment amounts. Although the existence of a balloon payment is determined pursuant to § 1026.37(b)(5) and its commentary (see comment 37(c)(1)(i)(B)-1), balloon payment amounts to be disclosed under § 1026.37(c) are calculated in the same manner as periodic principal and interest payments under § 1026.37(c)(2)(i). For example, for a balloon payment amount that can change depending on previous interest rate adjustments that are based on the value of an index at the time of the adjustment, the balloon payment amounts are calculated using the assumptions for minimum and maximum interest rates described in § 1026.37(c)(2)(i) and its commentary, and should be disclosed as a range of payments.

Paragraph 37(c)(2)(ii).

1. Mortgage insurance disclosure. Mortgage insurance premiums should be reflected on the disclosure required by § 1026.37(c) even if no escrow account is established for the payment of mortgage insurance premiums. If the consumer is not required to purchase mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent, the creditor discloses the mortgage insurance premium amount as “0.” If the creditor is disclosing the automatic termination or the absence of mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent under applicable law or the absence of mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent after coverage has terminated, the creditor discloses the mortgage insurance premium as “-.”

2. Relationship to principal and interest disclosure. The creditor discloses mortgage insurance premiums pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(2)(ii) on the same periodic basis that payments for principal and interest are disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(2)(i), even if mortgage insurance premiums are actually paid on some other periodic basis.

Paragraph 37(c)(2)(iii).

1. Escrow disclosure. The disclosure described in § 1026.37(c)(2)(iii) is required only if the creditor will establish an escrow account for the payment of some or all of the charges described in § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii). If no escrow account for the payment of some or all such charges will be established, the creditor discloses the escrow amount as “0.” If an escrow account is established for the payment of amounts described in § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii), but no escrow payment is required with a particular periodic payment (such as with a final balloon payment) or range of payments, the escrow payment should be disclosed as “ - .”

37(c)(3) Subheadings.

Paragraph 37(c)(3)(ii).

1. Years. Section 1026.37(c)(3)(ii) requires that each separate periodic payment or range of payments be disclosed under a subheading that states the years during which that payment or range of payments will apply and that such subheadings be stated in a sequence of whole years from the due date of the initial periodic payment. Therefore, for purposes of § 1026.37(c), “year” is defined as the twelve-month interval beginning on the due date of the initial periodic payment, and the next whole year begins each anniversary thereafter. If an event requiring the disclosure of an additional separate periodic payment or range of payments occurs on a date other than the anniversary of the due date of the initial periodic payment, and no other events occur during that single year requiring disclosure of multiple events under § 1026.37(c)(1)(iii)(B), such event is disclosed beginning in the next year in the sequence, because the separate periodic payment or range of payments that applied during the previous year will also apply during a portion of that year. For example:

i. Assume a fixed rate loan with a term of 124 months (10 years, four months). The creditor would label the disclosure of periodic payments as “Years 1-11.”

ii. Assume a loan with a 30-year term that does not require mortgage insurance and requires interest only payments for the first 60 months from the due date of the initial periodic payment, then requires fixed, fully amortizing payments of principal and interest beginning at the 61st month for the duration of the loan, the creditor would label the first disclosure of periodic payments as “Years 1-5” (including the term “only interest” pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(2)(i)) and the second disclosure of periodic payments or range of payments as “Years 6-30.” If that loan requires interest only payments for the first 54 months from the due date of the initial periodic payment, then requires fixed, fully amortizing payments of principal and interest for the duration of the loan, because the change in the periodic payment occurs on a date other than the anniversary of the due date of the initial periodic payment and the previous payment applies during that year, the creditor would likewise label the first disclosure of periodic payments as “Years 1-5” (including the term “only interest” pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(2)(i)) and the second disclosure of periodic payments or range of payments as “Years 6-30.” If the loan that requires interest only payments for the first 54 months also requires mortgage insurance that would automatically terminate under applicable law after the 100th month from the due date of the initial periodic payment, the creditor would label the first disclosure of periodic payments as “Years 1-5” (including the term “only interest” pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(2)(i)), the second disclosure of periodic payments or range of payments as “Years 6-9,” and the third disclosure of periodic payments or range of payments as “Years 10-30.”

2. Loans with variable terms. If the loan term may increase based on an adjustment of the interest rate, the creditor must disclose the maximum loan term possible under the legal obligation. To calculate the maximum loan term, the creditor assumes that the interest rate rises as rapidly as possible, taking into account the terms of the legal obligation, including any applicable caps on interest rate adjustments and lifetime interest rate cap. See comment 37(a)(8)-2.

37(c)(4) Taxes, insurance, and assessments.

Paragraph 37(c)(4)(ii).

1. Definition of taxes, insurance, and assessments. See the commentary under § 1026.43(b)(8) for guidance on the charges that are included in taxes, insurance, and assessments for purposes of § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii), except that the portion of that commentary related to amounts identified in § 1026.4(b)(5) is inapplicable to the disclosure required by § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii).

Paragraph 37(c)(4)(iv).

1. Description of other amounts. Section 1026.37(c)(4)(iv) requires the creditor to disclose a statement of whether the amount disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii) includes payments for property taxes, amounts identified in § 1026.4(b)(8) (homeowner's insurance premiums), and other amounts described in § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii), along with a description of any such other amounts. If the amount disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii) requires the creditor to disclose a description of more than one amount other than amounts for payment of property taxes or homeowner's insurance premiums, the creditor may disclose a descriptive statement of one such amount along with an indication that additional amounts are also included, such as by using the phrase “and additional costs.”

2. Amounts paid by the creditor using escrow account funds. Section 1026.37(c)(4)(iv) requires the creditor to disclose an indication of whether the amounts disclosed under § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii) will be paid by the creditor using escrow account funds. If only a portion of the amounts disclosed under § 1026.37(c)(4)(ii), including, without limitation, property taxes, homeowner's insurance, and assessments, will be paid by the creditor using escrow account funds, the creditor may indicate that only a portion of the amounts disclosed will be paid using escrow account funds, such as by using the word “some.”

37(d) Costs at closing.

37(d)(2) Optional alternative table for transactions without a seller or for simultaneous subordinate financing.

1. Optional use. The optional alternative disclosure of the estimated cash to close provided for in § 1026.37(d)(2) may be used by a creditor only in a transaction without a seller or a simultaneous subordinate financing transaction. In a purchase transaction, the optional alternative disclosure may be used for the simultaneous subordinate financing Loan Estimate only if the first-lien Closing Disclosure will record the entirety of the seller's transaction. Creditors may only use this alternative estimated cash to close disclosure in conjunction with the alternative disclosure under § 1026.37(h)(2).

2. Method of indication. The indication of whether the estimated cash is either due from or payable to the consumer can be made by the use of check boxes as shown in form H-24(D) of appendix H to this part.

37(f) Closing cost details; loan costs.

1. General description. The items disclosed under § 1026.37(f) include services that the creditor or mortgage broker require for consummation, such as underwriting, appraisal, and title services.

2. Mortgage broker. Commentary under § 1026.19(e)(1)(ii) discusses the requirements and responsibilities of mortgage brokers that provide the disclosures required by § 1026.19(e), which include the disclosures set forth in § 1026.37(f).

3. Construction loan inspection and handling fees. Inspection and handling fees for the staged disbursement of construction loan proceeds, including draw fees, are loan costs associated with the transaction for purposes of § 1026.37(f). If inspection and handling fees are collected at or before consummation, the total of such fees is disclosed in the loan costs table. If inspection and handling fees will be collected after consummation, the total of such fees is disclosed in a separate addendum and the fees are not counted for purposes of the calculating cash to close table. See comment 37(f)(6)-3 for a description of an addendum used to disclose inspection and handling fees that will be collected after consummation. See also comments 38(f)-2 and app. D-7.vii. If the number of inspections and disbursements is not known at the time the disclosures are provided, the creditor discloses the fees that will be collected based on the best information reasonably available to the creditor at the time the disclosure is provided. See comment 19(e)(1)(i)-1. See § 1026.17(e) and its commentary for an explanation of the effect of subsequent events that cause inaccuracies in disclosures.

37(f)(1) Origination charges.

1. Origination charges. Charges included under the subheading “Origination Charges” pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(1) are those charges paid by the consumer to each creditor and loan originator for originating and extending the credit, regardless of how such fees are denominated. In accordance with § 1026.37(o)(4), the dollar amounts disclosed under § 1026.37(f)(1) must be rounded to the nearest whole dollar and the percentage amounts must be disclosed as an exact number up to two or three decimal places, except that decimal places shall not be disclosed if the percentage is a whole number. See comment 19(e)(3)(i)-3 for a discussion of when a fee is considered to be “paid to” a person. See § 1026.36(a) and associated commentary for a discussion of the meaning of “loan originator” in connection with limits on compensation in a consumer credit transaction secured by a dwelling.

2. Indirect loan originator compensation. Only charges paid directly by the consumer to compensate a loan originator are included in the amounts listed under § 1026.37(f)(1). Compensation of a loan originator paid indirectly by the creditor through the interest rate is not itemized on the Loan Estimate required by § 1026.19(e). However, pursuant to § 1026.38(f)(1), such compensation is itemized on the Closing Disclosure required by § 1026.19(f).

3. Description of charges. Other than for points charged in connection with the transaction to reduce the interest rate, for which specific language must be used, the creditor may use a general label that uses terminology that, under § 1026.37(f)(5), is consistent with § 1026.17(a)(1), clearly and conspicuously describes the service that is disclosed as an origination charge pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(1). Items that are listed under the subheading “Origination Charges” may include, for example, application fee, origination fee, underwriting fee, processing fee, verification fee, and rate-lock fee.

4. Points. If there are no points charged in connection with the transaction to reduce the interest rate, the creditor leaves blank the percentage of points used in the label and the dollar amount disclosed under § 1026.37(f)(1)(i).

5. Itemization. Creditors determine the level of itemization of “Origination Charges” that is appropriate under § 1026.37(f)(1) in relation to charges paid by the consumer to the creditor, subject to the limitations in § 1026.37(f)(1)(ii). For example, the following charges should be itemized separately: compensation paid directly by a consumer to a loan originator that is not also the creditor; or a charge imposed to pay for a loan level pricing adjustment assessed on the creditor, which the creditor passes onto the consumer as a charge at consummation and not as an adjustment to the interest rate.

37(f)(2) Services you cannot shop for.

1. Services disclosed. Items included under the subheading “Services You Cannot Shop For” pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(2) are for those services that the creditor requires in connection with the transaction that would be provided by persons other than the creditor or mortgage broker and for which the creditor does not permit the consumer to shop in accordance with § 1026.19(e)(1)(vi). Comment 19(e)(1)(vi)-1 clarifies that a consumer is not permitted to shop if the consumer must choose a provider from a list provided by the creditor. Comment 19(e)(3)(i)-1 addresses determining good faith in providing estimates under § 1026.19(e), including estimates for services for which the consumer cannot shop. Comments 19(e)(3)(iv)-1 through -3 discuss limits and requirements applicable to providing revised estimates for services for which the consumer cannot shop.

2. Examples of charges. Examples of the services and amounts to be disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(2) might include an appraisal fee, appraisal management company fee, credit report fee, flood determination fee, government funding fee, homeowner's association certification fee, lender's attorney fee, tax status research fee, third-party subordination fee, title - closing protection letter fee, title - lender's title insurance policy, and an upfront mortgage insurance fee, provided that the fee is charged at consummation and is not a prepayment of future premiums over a specific future time period or a payment into an escrow account. Government funding fees include a United States Department of Veterans Affairs or United States Department of Agriculture guarantee fee, or any other fee paid to a government entity as part of a governmental loan program, that is paid at consummation.

3. Title insurance services. The services required to be labeled beginning with “Title -” pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(2) or (3) are those required for the issuance of title insurance policies to the creditor in connection with the consummation of the transaction or for conducting the closing. These services may include, for example:

i. Examination and evaluation, based on relevant law and title insurance underwriting principles and guidelines, of the title evidence to determine the insurability of the title being examined and what items to include or exclude in any title commitment and policy to be issued;

ii. Preparation and issuance of the title commitment or other document that discloses the status of the title as it is proposed to be insured, identifies the conditions that must be met before the policy will be issued, and obligates the insurer to issue a policy of title insurance if such conditions are met;

iii. Resolution of underwriting issues and taking the steps needed to satisfy any conditions for the issuance of the policies;

iv. Preparation and issuance of the policy or policies of title insurance; and

v. Premiums for any title insurance coverage for the benefit of the creditor.

4. Lender's title insurance policy. Section 1026.37(f)(2) and (3) requires disclosure of the amount the consumer will pay for the lender's title insurance policy. However, an owner's title insurance policy that covers the consumer and is not required to be purchased by the creditor is only disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g). Accordingly, the creditor must quote the amount of the lender's title insurance coverage pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(2) or (3) as applicable based on the type of lender's title insurance policy required by its underwriting standards for that loan. The amount disclosed for the lender's title insurance policy pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(2) or (3) is the amount of the premium without any adjustment that might be made for the simultaneous purchase of an owner's title insurance policy. This amount may be disclosed as “Title - Premium for Lender's Coverage,” or in any similar manner that clearly indicates the amount of the premium disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(2) is for the lender's title insurance coverage. See comment 37(g)(4)-1 for a discussion of the disclosure of the premium for an owner's title insurance policy that covers the consumer.

37(f)(3) Services you can shop for.

1. Services disclosed. Items included under the subheading “Services You Can Shop For” pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(3) are for those services: That the creditor requires in connection with its decision to make the loan; that would be provided by persons other than the creditor or mortgage broker; and for which the creditor allows the consumer to shop in accordance with § 1026.19(e)(1)(vi). Comments 19(e)(3)(ii)-1 through -3, and -5 address the determination of good faith in providing estimates of charges for services for which the consumer can shop. Comment 19(e)(3)(iii)-2 discusses the determination of good faith when the consumer chooses a provider that is not on the list the creditor provides to the consumer when the consumer is permitted to shop consistent with § 1026.19(e)(1)(vi). Comments 19(e)(3)(iv)-1 through -3 discuss limits and requirements applicable to providing revised estimates for services for which the consumer can shop.

2. Example of charges. Examples of the services to be listed under this subheading pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(3) might include a pest inspection fee, survey fee, title - closing agent fee, and title - closing protection letter fee.

3. Title insurance. See comments 37(f)(2)-3 and -4 for guidance on services that are to be labeled beginning with “Title - ” and on calculating and labeling the amount disclosed for lender's title insurance pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(3). See comment 37(g)(4)-1 for a discussion of the disclosure of the premium for owner's title insurance coverage.

37(f)(5) Item descriptions and ordering.

1. Clear and conspicuous standard. Section 1026.37(f)(5) requires creditors to label the loan costs disclosed pursuant § 1026.37(f) using terminology that describes each item. A creditor complies with this requirement if it uses terminology that is clear and conspicuous, consistent with § 1026.17(a)(1), and describes the service or administrative function that the charge pays for in a manner that is reasonably understood by consumers within the space provided in form H-24 of appendix H to this part. For example, if a creditor imposes a fee on a consumer to cover the costs associated with underwriting the transaction, the creditor would comply with § 1026.37(f)(5) if it labeled the cost “Underwriting Fee.” A label that uses abbreviations or acronyms that are not reasonably understood by consumers would not comply with § 1026.37(f)(5).

37(f)(6) Use of addenda.

1. State law disclosures. If a creditor is required by State law to make additional disclosures that, pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(6)(i), cannot be included in the disclosures required under § 1026.37(f), the creditor may make those additional State law disclosures on a document whose pages are separate from, and are not presented as part of, the disclosures prescribed in § 1026.37, for example, as an addendum to the Loan Estimate. See comment 37(o)(1)-1.

2. Reference to addendum. If an addendum is used as permitted under § 1026.37(f)(6)(ii), an example of a label that complies with the requirement for an appropriate reference on the last line is: “See attached page for additional items you can shop for.”

3. Addendum for post-consummation inspection and handling fees. A creditor makes the disclosures required by § 1026.37(f) and comment 37(f)-3 for construction loan inspection and handling fees collected after consummation by disclosing the total of such fees under the heading “Inspection and Handling Fees Collected After Closing” in an addendum, which may be the addendum pursuant to § 1026.37(f)(6) or any other addendum or additional page under § 1026.37. See comment 37(o)(1)-1. For purposes of comment 38(f)-2, the addendum may be any addendum or additional page under § 1026.38. If the actual amount of such fees is not known at the time the disclosures are provided, the disclosures in the addendum are based upon the best information reasonably available to the creditor at the time the disclosure is provided. See comment 19(e)(1)(i)-1. For example, such information could include amounts the creditor has previously charged in similar construction transactions or the amount of estimated inspection and handling fees used by the creditor for purposes of setting the construction loan's commitment amount.

37(g) Closing cost details; other costs.

1. General description. The items listed under the heading of “Other Costs” pursuant to § 1026.37(g) include services that are ancillary to the creditor's decision to evaluate the collateral and the consumer for the loan. The amounts disclosed for these items are: Established by government action; determined by standard calculations applied to ongoing fixed costs; or based on an obligation incurred by the consumer independently of any requirement imposed by the creditor. Except for prepaid interest under § 1026.37(g)(2)(iii), or charges for optional credit insurance provided by the creditor, the creditor does not retain any of the amounts or portions of the amounts disclosed as other costs.

2. Charges pursuant to property contract. The creditor is required to disclose charges that are described in § 1026.37(g)(1) through (3). Other charges that are required to be paid at or before closing pursuant to the property contract for sale between the consumer and seller are disclosed on the Loan Estimate to the extent the creditor has knowledge of those charges when it issues the Loan Estimate, consistent with the good faith standard under § 1026.19(e). A creditor has knowledge of those charges where, for example, it has the real estate purchase and sale contract. See also § 1026.37(g)(4) and comment 37(g)(4)-3.

37(g)(1) Taxes and other government fees.

1. Recording fees. Recording fees listed under § 1026.37(g)(1) are fees assessed by a government authority to record and index the loan and title documents as required under State or local law. Recording fees are assessed based on the type of document to be recorded or its physical characteristics, such as the number of pages. Unlike transfer taxes, recording fees are not based on the sale price of the property or loan amount. For example, a fee for recording a subordination agreement that is $20, plus $3 for each page over three pages, is a recording fee, but a fee of $1,250 based on 0.5 percent of the loan amount is a transfer tax, and not a recording fee.

2. Other government charges. Any charges or fees imposed by a State or local government that are not transfer taxes are aggregated with recording fees and disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(1)(i).

3. Transfer taxes - terminology. In general, transfer taxes listed under § 1026.37(g)(1) are State and local government fees on mortgages and home sales that are based on the loan amount or sales price, while recording fees are State and local government fees for recording the loan and title documents. The name that is used under State or local law to refer to these amounts is not determinative of whether they are disclosed as transfer taxes or as recording fees and other taxes under § 1026.37(g)(1).

4. Transfer taxes - consumer. Only transfer taxes paid by the consumer are disclosed on the Loan Estimate pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(1). State and local government transfer taxes are governed by State or local law, which determines if the seller or consumer is ultimately responsible for paying the transfer taxes. For example, if State law indicates a lien can attach to the consumer's acquired property if the transfer tax is not paid, the transfer tax is disclosed. If State or local law is unclear or does not specifically attribute transfer taxes to the seller or the consumer, the creditor is in compliance with requirements of § 1026.37(g)(1) if the amount of the transfer tax disclosed is not less than the amount apportioned to the consumer using common practice in the locality of the property.

5. Transfer taxes - seller. Transfer taxes paid by the seller in a purchase transaction are not disclosed on the Loan Estimate under § 1026.37(g)(1), but are disclosed on the Closing Disclosure pursuant to § 1026.38(g)(1)(ii).

6. Deletion and addition of items. The lines and labels required by § 1026.37(g)(1) may not be deleted, even if recording fees or transfer taxes are not charged to the consumer. No additional items may be listed under the subheading in § 1026.37(g)(1).

37(g)(2) Prepaids.

1. Examples. Prepaid items required to be disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(2) include the interest due at consummation for the period of time before interest begins to accrue for the first scheduled periodic payment and certain periodic charges that are required by the creditor to be paid at consummation. Each periodic charge listed as a prepaid item indicates, as applicable, the time period that the charge will cover, the daily amount, the percentage rate of interest used to calculate the charge, and the total dollar amount of the charge. Examples of periodic charges that are disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(2) include:

i. Real estate property taxes due within 60 days after consummation of the transaction;

ii. Past-due real estate property taxes;

iii. Mortgage insurance premiums;

iv. Flood insurance premiums; and

v. Homeowner's insurance premiums.

2. Interest rate. The interest rate disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(2)(iii) is the same interest rate disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(b)(2).

3. Terminology. For purposes of § 1026.37(g)(2), the term “property taxes” has the same meaning as in § 1026.43(b)(8) and further described in comment 43(b)(8)-2; the term “homeowner's insurance” means the amounts identified in § 1026.4(b)(8); and the term “mortgage insurance” has the same meaning as “mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent” in § 1026.37(c), which means the amounts identified in § 1026.4(b)(5).

4. Deletion of items. The lines and labels required by § 1026.37(g)(2) may not be deleted, even if amounts for those labeled items are not charged to the consumer. If an amount for a labeled item is not charged to the consumer, the time period, daily amount, and percentage used in the labels are left blank.

37(g)(3) Initial escrow payment at closing.

1. Listed item not charged. Pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(3), each periodic charge to be included in the escrow or reserve account must be itemized under the “Initial Escrow Payment at Closing” subheading, with a relevant label, monthly payment amount, and number of months expected to be collected at consummation. If an item described in § 1026.37(g)(3)(i) through (iii) is not charged to the consumer, the monthly payment amount and time period used in the labels are left blank.

2. Aggregate escrow account calculation. The aggregate escrow account adjustment required under § 1026.38(g)(3) and 12 CFR 1024.17(d)(2) is not included on the Loan Estimate under § 1026.37(g)(3).

3. Terminology. As used in § 1026.37(g)(3), the term “property taxes” has the same meaning as in § 1026.43(b)(8) and further described in comment 43(b)(8)-2; the term “homeowner's insurance” means the amounts identified in § 1026.4(b)(8); and the term “mortgage insurance” has the same meaning as “mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent” in § 1026.37(c).

4. Deletion of items. The lines and labels required by § 1026.37(g)(3) may not be deleted, even if amounts for those labeled items are not charged to the consumer.

5. Escrowed tax payments for different time frames. Payments for property taxes that are paid at different time periods can be itemized separately when done in accordance with 12 CFR 1024.17, as applicable. For example, a general property tax covering a fiscal year from January 1 to December 31 can be listed as a property tax under § 1026.37(g)(3)(i); and a separate property tax to fund schools that cover a fiscal year from November 1 to October 31 can be added as a separate item under § 1026.37(g)(3)(v).

37(g)(4) Other.

1. Owner's title insurance policy rate. The amount disclosed for an owner's title insurance premium pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(4) is based on a basic owner's policy rate, and not on an “enhanced” title insurance policy premium, except that the creditor may instead disclose the premium for an “enhanced” policy when the “enhanced” title insurance policy is required by the real estate sales contract, if such requirement is known to the creditor when issuing the Loan Estimate. This amount should be disclosed as “Title - Owner's Title Policy (optional),” or in any similar manner that includes the introductory description “Title -” at the beginning of the label for the item, the parenthetical description “(optional)” at the end of the label, and clearly indicates the amount of the premium disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(4) is for the owner's title insurance coverage. See comment 37(f)(2)-4 for a discussion of the disclosure of the premium for lender's title insurance coverage.

2. Simultaneous title insurance premium rate in purchase transactions. The premium for an owner's title insurance policy for which a special rate may be available based on the simultaneous issuance of a lender's and an owner's policy is calculated and disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(4) as follows:

i. The title insurance premium for a lender's title policy is based on the full premium rate, consistent with § 1026.37(f)(2) or (f)(3).

ii. The owner's title insurance premium is calculated by taking the full owner's title insurance premium, adding the simultaneous issuance premium for the lender's coverage, and then deducting the full premium for lender's coverage.

3. Designation of optional items. Products disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(4) for which the parenthetical description “(optional)” is included at the end of the label for the item include only items that are separate from any item disclosed on the Loan Estimate under paragraphs other than § 1026.37(g)(4). For example, such items may include optional owner's title insurance, credit life insurance, debt suspension coverage, debt cancellation coverage, warranties of home appliances and systems, and similar products, when coverage is written in connection with a credit transaction that is subject to § 1026.19(e). However, because the requirement in § 1026.37(g)(4)(ii) applies to separate products only, additional coverage and endorsements on insurance otherwise required by the lender are not disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(4). See comments 4(b)(7) and (b)(8)-1 through -3 and comments 4(b)(10)-1 and -2 for guidance on determining when credit life insurance, debt suspension coverage, debt cancellation coverage, and similar coverage is written in connection with a transaction subject to § 1026.19(e).

4. Examples. Examples of other items that are disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(4) if the creditor is aware of those items when it issues the Loan Estimate include commissions of real estate brokers or agents, additional payments to the seller to purchase personal property pursuant to the property contract, homeowner's association and condominium charges associated with the transfer of ownership, and fees for inspections not required by the creditor but paid by the consumer pursuant to the property contract. Although the consumer is obligated for these costs, they are not imposed upon the consumer by the creditor or loan originator. Therefore, they are not disclosed with the parenthetical description “(optional)” at the end of the label for the item, and they are disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g) rather than § 1026.37(f). Even if such items are not required to be disclosed on the Loan Estimate under § 1026.37(g)(4), however, they may be required to be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure pursuant to § 1026.38. Comment 19(e)(3)(iii)-3 discusses application of the good faith requirement for services chosen by the consumer that are not required by the creditor.

37(g)(6) Total closing costs.

Paragraph 37(g)(6)(ii).

1. Lender credits. Section 1026.19(e)(1)(i) requires disclosure of lender credits as provided in § 1026.37(g)(6)(ii). Such lender credits include non-specific lender credits as well as specific lender credits. See comment 19(e)(3)(i)-5.

2. Credits or rebates from the creditor to offset a portion or all of the closing costs. For loans where a portion or all of the closing costs are offset by a credit or rebate provided by the creditor (sometimes referred to as “no-cost” loans), whether all or a defined portion of the closing costs disclosed under § 1026.37(f) or (g) will be paid by a credit or rebate from the creditor, the creditor discloses such credit or rebate as a lender credit under § 1026.37(g)(6)(ii). The creditor should ensure that the lender credit disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(6)(ii) is sufficient to cover the estimated costs the creditor represented to the consumer as not being required to be paid by the consumer at consummation, regardless of whether such representations pertained to specific items.

37(g)(7) Item descriptions and ordering.

1. Clear and conspicuous standard. See comment 37(f)(5)-1 for guidance regarding the requirement to label items using terminology that describes each item.

37(g)(8) Use of addenda.

1. State law disclosures. If a creditor is required by State law to make additional disclosures that, pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(8), cannot be included in the disclosures required under § 1026.37(g), the creditor may make those additional State law disclosures on a separate document whose pages are physically separate from, and are not presented as part of, the disclosures prescribed in § 1026.37. See comment 37(o)(1)-1.

37(h) Calculating cash to close.

37(h)(1) For all transactions.

1. Labels for amounts disclosed. Section 1026.37(h)(1) describes the amounts that are used to calculate the estimated amount of cash or other funds that the consumer must provide at consummation. The labels that are to be used under § 1026.37(h)(1) are illustrated by form H-24(A) of appendix H to this part.

2. Simultaneous subordinate financing. On the Loan Estimate for simultaneous subordinate financing purchase transactions, the sale price disclosed under § 1026.37(a)(7)(i) is not used under § 1026.37(h)(1) for the calculating cash to close table calculations that include the sale price as a component of the calculation. For example, sale price is generally included in the closing costs financed calculation under § 1026.37(h)(1)(ii) as a component of the estimated total amount of payments to third parties. However, for simultaneous subordinate financing transactions, the estimated total amount of payments to third parties would not include the sale price. The estimated total amount of payments to third parties only includes payments occurring in the simultaneous subordinate financing transaction other than payments toward the sale price.

37(h)(1)(ii) Closing costs financed.

1. Calculation of amount. The amount of closing costs financed disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(ii) is determined by subtracting the estimated total amount of payments to third parties not otherwise disclosed under § 1026.37(f) and (g) from the loan amount disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(1). The estimated total amount of payments to third parties includes the sale price disclosed under § 1026.37(a)(7)(i), if applicable, unless otherwise excluded under comment 37(h)(1)-2. Other examples of payments to third parties not otherwise disclosed under § 1026.37(f) and (g) include the amount of construction costs for transactions that involve improvements to be made on the property and payoffs of secured or unsecured debt. If the result of the calculation is zero or negative, the amount of $0 is disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(ii). If the result of the calculation is a positive number, that amount is disclosed as a negative number under § 1026.37(h)(1)(ii), but only to the extent that the absolute value of the amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(ii) does not exceed the total amount of closing costs disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(6).

2. Loan amount. The loan amount disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(1), a component of the closing costs financed calculation, is the total amount the consumer will borrow, as reflected by the face amount of the note.

37(h)(1)(iii) Down payment and other funds from borrower.

1. Down payment and funds from borrower calculation. For purposes of § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(A)(1), the down payment and funds from borrower amount is calculated as the difference between the sale price of the property disclosed under § 1026.37(a)(7)(i) and the sum of the loan amount and any amount of existing loans assumed or taken subject to that will be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure under § 1026.38(j)(2)(iv). The calculation is independent of any loan program or investor requirements.

2. Funds for borrower. Section 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(A)(2) requires that, in a purchase transaction as defined in paragraph (a)(9)(i) of this section that is a simultaneous subordinate financing transaction or that involves improvements to be made on the property, or when the sum of the loan amount disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(1) and any amount of existing loans assumed or taken subject to that will be disclosed under § 1026.38(j)(2)(iv) exceeds the sale price disclosed under § 1026.37(a)(7)(i), the amount of funds from the consumer is determined in accordance with § 1026.37(h)(1)(v). Section 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(B) requires that, for all non-purchase transactions, the amount of estimated funds from the consumer is determined in accordance with § 1026.37(h)(1)(v). Pursuant to § 1026.37(h)(1)(v), the amount to be disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(A)(2) or (B) is determined by subtracting the sum of the loan amount disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(1) and any amount of existing loans assumed or taken subject to that will be disclosed under § 1026.38(j)(2)(iv) (excluding any closing costs financed disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(ii)) from the total amount of all existing debt being satisfied in the transaction. The total amount of all existing debt being satisfied in the transaction is the sum of the amounts that will be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure in the summaries of transactions table under § 1026.38(j)(1)(ii), (iii), and (v), as applicable. When the result of the calculation is positive, that amount is disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii) as “Down Payment/Funds from Borrower,” and $0 is disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(v) as “Funds for Borrower.” When the result of the calculation is negative, that amount is disclosed as a negative number under § 1026.37(h)(1)(v) as “Funds for Borrower,” and $0 is disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii) as “Down Payment/Funds from Borrower.” When the result is $0, $0 is disclosed as “Down Payment/Funds from Borrower” and “Funds for Borrower” under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii) and (v), respectively.

37(h)(1)(iv) Deposit.

1. Section 1026.37(h)(1)(iv)(A) requires disclosure of a deposit in a purchase transaction. The deposit to be disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iv)(A) is any amount that the consumer has agreed to pay to a party identified in the real estate purchase and sale agreement to be held until consummation of the transaction, which is often referred to as an earnest money deposit. In a purchase transaction in which no such deposit is paid in connection with the transaction, § 1026.37(h)(1)(iv)(A) requires the creditor to disclose $0. In any other type of transaction, § 1026.37(h)(1)(iv)(B) requires disclosure of the deposit amount as $0.

37(h)(1)(v) Funds for borrower.

1. No funds for borrower. When the down payment and other funds from the borrower is determined in accordance with § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(A)(1), the amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(v) as funds for the borrower is $0.

2. Total amount of existing debt satisfied in the transaction. The amounts disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(A)(2) or (B), as applicable, and (h)(1)(v) are determined by subtracting the sum of the loan amount disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(1) and any amount of existing loans assumed or taken subject to that will be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure under § 1026.38(j)(2)(iv) (excluding any closing costs financed disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(ii)) from the total amount of all existing debt being satisfied in the transaction. The total amount of all existing debt being satisfied in the transaction is the sum of the amounts that will be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure in the summaries of transactions table under § 1026.38(j)(1)(ii), (iii), and (v), as applicable.

37(h)(1)(vi) Seller credits.

1. Non-specific seller credits to be disclosed. Non-specific seller credits, i.e., general payments from the seller to the consumer that do not pay for a particular fee on the disclosures provided under § 1026.19(e)(1), known to the creditor at the time of delivery of the Loan Estimate, are disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vi). For example, a creditor may learn the amount of seller credits that will be paid in the transaction from information obtained from the consumer, from a review of the purchase and sale contract, or from information obtained from a real estate agent in the transaction.

2. Seller credits for specific charges. To the extent known by the creditor at the time of delivery of the Loan Estimate, specific seller credits, i.e., seller credits for specific items disclosed under § 1026.37(f) and (g), may be either disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vi) or reflected in the amounts disclosed for those specific items under § 1026.37(f) and (g). For example, if the creditor knows at the time of the delivery of the Loan Estimate that the seller has agreed to pay half of a $100 required pest inspection fee, the creditor may either disclose the required pest inspection fee as $100 under § 1026.37(f) with a $50 seller credit disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vi) or disclose the required pest inspection fee as $50 under § 1026.37(f), reflecting the specific seller credit in the amount disclosed for the pest inspection fee. If the creditor knows at the time of the delivery of the Loan Estimate that the seller has agreed to pay the entire $100 pest inspection fee, the creditor may either disclose the required pest inspection fee as $100 under § 1026.37(f) with a $100 seller credit disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vi) or disclose nothing under § 1026.37(f), reflecting that the specific seller credit will cover the entire pest inspection fee.

37(h)(1)(vii) Adjustments and other credits.

1. Other credits known at the time the Loan Estimate is issued. Amounts expected to be paid at closing by third parties not otherwise associated with the transaction, such as gifts from family members and not otherwise identified under § 1026.37(h)(1), are included in the amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii). Amounts expected to be provided in advance of closing by third parties, including family members, not otherwise associated with the transaction are not required to be disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii).

2. Persons that may make payments causing adjustment and other credits. Persons, as defined under § 1026.2(a)(22), means natural persons or organizations. Accordingly, persons that may pay amounts disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii) include, for example, any individual family members providing gifts or a developer or home builder organization providing a credit in the transaction.

3. Credits. Only credits from persons other than the creditor or seller can be disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii). Seller credits and credits from the creditor are disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(h)(1)(vi) and § 1026.37(g)(6)(ii), respectively.

4. Other credits to be disclosed. Credits other than those from the creditor or seller are disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii). Disclosure of other credits is, like other disclosures under § 1026.37, subject to the good faith requirement under § 1026.19(e)(1)(i). See § 1026.19(e)(1)(i) and comments 17(c)(2)(i)-1 and 19(e)(1)(i)-1. The creditor may obtain information regarding items to be disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii), for example, from the consumer, from a review of the purchase and sale contract, or from information obtained from a real estate agent in the transaction.

5. Proceeds from subordinate financing or other source. Funds that are provided to the consumer from the proceeds of subordinate financing, local or State housing assistance grants, or other similar sources are included in the amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii) on the first-lien transaction Loan Estimate.

6. Reduction in amounts for adjustments. Adjustments that require additional funds from the consumer in a transaction disclosed using the formula under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(A)(1) or pursuant to the real estate purchase and sale contract, such as for additional personal property that will be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure under § 1026.38(j)(1)(iii) or adjustments that will be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure under § 1026.38(j)(1)(v), are only included in the amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii) if such amounts are not included in the calculation under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(A)(2) or (B) or § 1026.37(h)(1)(v) as debt being satisfied in the transaction. Other examples of adjustments for additional funds from the consumer include payoffs of secured or unsecured debt in a purchase transaction disclosed using the formula under § 1026.37(h)(1)(iii)(A)(1) or prorations for property taxes and homeowner's association dues. The total amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(vii) is a sum of adjustments requiring additional funds from the consumer, calculated as positive amounts, and other credits, such as those provided for in comment 37(h)(1)(vii)-1, calculated as negative amounts.

37(h)(1)(viii) Estimated cash to close.

1. Result of cash to close calculation. The sum of the amounts disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(h)(1)(i) through (vii) is disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(1)(viii) as either a positive number, a negative number, or zero. A positive number indicates the amount that the consumer will pay at consummation. A negative number indicates the amount that the consumer will receive at consummation. A result of zero indicates that the consumer will neither pay nor receive any amount at consummation.

37(h)(2) Optional alternative calculating cash to close table for transactions without a seller or for simultaneous subordinate financing.

1. Optional use. The optional alternative disclosure of the calculating cash to close table in § 1026.37(h)(2) may only be provided by a creditor in a transaction without a seller or for simultaneous subordinate financing. In a purchase transaction, the optional alternative disclosure may be used for the simultaneous subordinate financing Loan Estimate only if the first-lien Closing Disclosure will record the entirety of the seller's transaction. The use of this alternative table for transactions without a seller or for simultaneous subordinate financing is optional, but creditors may only use this alternative estimated cash to close disclosure in conjunction with the alternative disclosure under § 1026.37(d)(2).

37(h)(2)(iii) Payoffs and payments.

1. Examples. Examples of the amounts incorporated in the total amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii) include, but are not limited to: Payoffs of existing liens secured by the property identified under § 1026.37(a)(6) such as existing mortgages, deeds of trust, judgments that have attached to the real property, mechanics' and materialmen's liens, and local, State and Federal tax liens; payments of unsecured outstanding debts of the consumer; construction costs associated with the transaction that the consumer will be obligated to pay in any transaction in which the creditor is otherwise permitted to use the alternative calculating cash to close table; and payments to other third parties for outstanding debts of the consumer, excluding settlement services, as required to be paid as a condition for the extension of credit. Amounts that will be paid with funds provided by the consumer, including partial payments, such as a portion of construction costs, or amounts that will be paid by third parties and will be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure under § 1026.38(t)(5)(vii)(B), are calculated as credits, using positive numbers, in the total amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii).

2. Disclosure of subordinate financing. i. First-lien Loan Estimate. On the Loan Estimate for a first-lien transaction disclosed with the optional alternative table pursuant to § 1026.37(h)(2), such as a refinance transaction that also has simultaneous subordinate financing, the proceeds of the simultaneous subordinate financing are included, as a positive number, in the total amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii). The total amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii) is a negative number unless the proceeds from the subordinate financing and any amounts entered as credits as discussed in comment 37(h)(2)(iii)-1 equal or exceed the total amount of other payoffs and payments that are included in the calculation under § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii). If the proceeds from the subordinate financing and any amounts entered as credits as discussed in comment 37(h)(2)(iii)-1 equal or exceed the total amount of other payoffs and payments that are included in the calculation under § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii), the total amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii) is disclosed as $0 or a positive number.

ii. Simultaneous subordinate financing Loan Estimate. On the simultaneous subordinate financing Loan Estimate disclosed with the optional alternative table pursuant to § 1026.37(h)(2), the proceeds of the subordinate financing that will be applied to the first-lien transaction may be included in the payoffs and payments disclosure under § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii).

37(h)(2)(iv) Cash to or from consumer.

1. Method of indication. The indication of whether the estimated cash to close is either due from or payable to the consumer is made by the use of check boxes, which is illustrated by form H-24(D) of appendix H to this part.

37(h)(2)(v) Closing costs financed.

1. Limitation on amount disclosed. The amount disclosed under § 1026.37(h)(2)(v) is limited to the total amount of closing costs disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(6), even if the difference between § 1026.37(h)(2)(i) and § 1026.37(h)(2)(iii) is greater than the amount disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(6).

37(i) Adjustable payment table.

1. When table is not permitted to be disclosed. The disclosure described in § 1026.37(i) is required only if the periodic principal and interest payment may change after consummation based on a loan term other than a change to the interest rate, or the transaction contains a seasonal payment product feature as described in § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii)(E). If the transaction does not contain such loan terms, this table shall not appear on the Loan Estimate.

2. Periods to be disclosed. Section 1026.37(i)(1) through (4) requires disclosure of the periods during which interest only, optional payment, step payment, and seasonal payment product features will be in effect. The periods required to be disclosed should be disclosed by describing the number of payments counting from the first periodic payment due after consummation. The period of seasonal payments required to be disclosed by § 1026.37(i)(4), to be clear and conspicuous, should be disclosed with a noun that identifies the unit-period, because such feature may apply on a regular basis during the loan term that does not depend on when regular periodic payments begin. The disclosures required by § 1026.37(i)(1) through (4) may include abbreviations to fit in the space provided for the information on form H-24, provided the information is disclosed in a clear and conspicuous manner. For example:

i. Period from date of consummation. If a loan has an interest only period for the first 60 regular periodic payments due after consummation, the disclosure states “for your first 60 payments.”

ii. Period during middle of loan term. If the loan has an interest only period between the 61st and 85th payments, the disclosure states “from your 61st to 85th payment.”

iii. Multiple successive periods. If there are multiple periods during which a certain adjustable payment term applies, such as a period of step payments that occurs from the first through 12th payments, does not occur from the 13th through 24th payments, and occurs again from the 25th through 36th payments, the period disclosed is the entire span of all such periods. Accordingly, such period is disclosed as “for your first 36 payments.”

iv. Seasonal payments. For a seasonal payment product with a unit-period of a month that does not require periodic payments for the months of June, July, and August each year during the loan term, because such feature depends on calendar months and not on when regular periodic payments begin, the period is disclosed as “from June to August.” For a transaction with a quarterly unit-period that does not require a periodic payment every third quarter during the loan term and does not depend on calendar months, the period is disclosed as “every third payment.” In the same transaction, if the seasonal payment feature ends after the 20th quarter, the period is disclosed as “every quarter until the 20th quarter.” As described above in this comment 37(i)-2, the creditor may abbreviate “quarter” to “quart.” or “Q.”

37(i)(5) Principal and interest payments.

1. Statement of periodic payment frequency. The subheading required by § 1026.37(i)(5) must include the unit-period of the transaction, such as “quarterly,” “bi-weekly,” or “annual.” This unit-period should be the same as disclosed under § 1026.37(b)(3). See § 1026.37(o)(5)(i).

2. Initial payment adjustment unknown. The disclosure required by § 1026.37(i)(5) must state the number of the first payment for which the regular periodic principal and interest payment may change. This payment is typically set forth in the legal obligation. However, if the exact payment number of the first adjustment is not known at the time the creditor provides the Loan Estimate, the creditor must disclose the earliest possible payment that may change under the terms of the legal obligation, based on the information available to the creditor at the time, as the initial payment number and amount.

3. Subsequent changes. The disclosure required by § 1026.37(i)(5) must state the frequency of adjustments to the regular periodic principal and interest payment after the initial adjustment, if any, expressed in years, except if adjustments are more frequent than once every year, in which case the disclosure should be expressed as payments. If there is only one adjustment of the periodic payment under the terms of the legal obligation (for example, if the loan has an interest only period for the first 60 payments and there are no adjustments to the payment after the end of the interest only period), the disclosure should state: “No subsequent changes.” If the loan has graduated increases in the regular periodic payment every 12th payment, the disclosure should state: “Every year.” If the frequency of adjustments to the periodic payment may change under the terms of the legal obligation, the disclosure should state the smallest period of adjustments that may occur. For example, if an increase in the periodic payment is scheduled every sixth payment for 36 payments, and then every 12th payment for the next 24 payments, the disclosure should state: “Every 6th payment.”

4. Maximum payment. The disclosure required by § 1026.37(i)(5) must state the larger of the maximum scheduled or maximum potential amount of a regular periodic principal and interest payment under the terms of the legal obligation, as well as the payment number of the first periodic principal and interest payment that can reach such amount. If the disclosed payment is scheduled, § 1026.37(i)(5) requires that the disclosure state the payment number when such payment is reached with the preceding text, “starting at.” If the disclosed payment is only potential, as may be the case for a loan that permits optional payments, the disclosure states the earliest payment number when such payment can be reached with the preceding text, “as early as.” Section 1026.37(i)(5) requires that the first possible periodic principal and interest payment that can reach the maximum be disclosed. For example, for a fixed interest rate optional-payment loan with scheduled payments that result in negative amortization under the terms of the legal obligation, the maximum periodic payment disclosed should be based on the consumer having elected to make the periodic payments that would increase the principal balance to the maximum amount at the latest time possible before the loan begins to fully amortize, which would cause the periodic principal and interest payment to be the maximum possible. For example, if the earliest payment that could reach the maximum principal balance was the 41st payment at which time the loan would begin to amortize and the periodic principal and interest payment would be recalculated, but the last payment that permitted the principal balance to increase was the 60th payment, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(i)(5) must assume the consumer only reaches the maximum principal balance at the 60th payment because this would result in the maximum possible principal and interest payment under the terms of the legal obligation. The disclosure must state the maximum periodic principal and interest payment based on this assumption and state “as early as the 61st payment.”

5. Payments that do not pay principal. Although the label of the disclosure required by § 1026.37(i)(5) is “Principal and Interest Payments,” and the section refers to periodic principal and interest payments, it includes a scheduled periodic payment that only covers some or all of the interest that is due and not any principal (i.e., an interest only or negatively amortizing payment).

37(j) Adjustable interest rate table.

1. When table is not permitted to be disclosed. The disclosure described in § 1026.37(j) is required only if the interest rate may increase after consummation, either based on changes to an index or scheduled changes to the interest rate. If the legal obligation does not permit the interest rate to adjust after consummation, such as for a “Fixed Rate” product under § 1026.37(a)(10), this table is not permitted to appear on the Loan Estimate. The creditor may not disclose a blank table or a table with “N/A” inserted within each row.

37(j)(1) Index and margin.

1. Index and margin. The index disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(j)(1) must be stated such that a consumer reasonably can identify it. A common abbreviation or acronym of the name of the index may be disclosed in place of the proper name of the index, if it is a commonly used public method of identifying the index. For example, “LIBOR” may be disclosed instead of London Interbank Offered Rate. The margin should be disclosed as a percentage. For example, if the contract determines the interest rate by adding 4.25 percentage points to the index, the margin should be disclosed as “4.25%.”

37(j)(2) Increases in interest rate.

1. Adjustments not based on an index. If the legal obligation includes both adjustments to the interest rate based on an external index and scheduled and pre-determined adjustments to the interest rate, such as for a “Step Rate” product under § 1026.37(a)(10), the disclosure required by § 1026.37(j)(1), and not § 1026.37(j)(2), must be provided pursuant to § 1026.37(j)(2). The disclosure described in § 1026.37(j)(2) is stated only if the product type does not permit the interest rate to adjust based on an external index.

37(j)(3) Initial interest rate.

1. Interest rate at consummation. In all cases, the interest rate in effect at consummation must be disclosed as the initial interest rate, even if it will apply only for a short period, such as one month.

37(j)(4) Minimum and maximum interest rate.

1. Minimum interest rate. The minimum interest rate required to be disclosed by § 1026.37(j)(4) is the minimum interest rate that may occur at any time during the term of the transaction, after any introductory or “teaser” interest rate expires, under the terms of the legal obligation, such as an interest rate “floor.” If the terms of the legal obligation do not state a minimum interest rate, the minimum interest rate that applies to the transaction under applicable law must be disclosed. If the terms of the legal obligation do not state a minimum interest rate, and no other minimum interest rate applies to the transaction under applicable law, the amount of the margin is disclosed.

2. Maximum interest rate. The maximum interest rate required to be disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(j)(4) is the maximum interest rate permitted under the terms of the legal obligation, such as an interest rate “cap.” If the terms of the legal obligation do not specify a maximum interest rate, the maximum interest rate permitted by applicable law, such as State usury law, must be disclosed.

37(j)(5) Frequency of adjustments.

1. Exact month unknown. The disclosure required by § 1026.37(j)(5) must state the first month for which the interest rate may change. This month is typically scheduled in the terms of the legal obligation. However, if the exact month is not known at the time the creditor provides the Loan Estimate, the creditor must disclose the earliest possible month under the terms of the legal obligation, based on the best information available to the creditor at the time.

37(j)(6) Limits on interest rate changes.

1. Different limits on subsequent interest rate adjustments. If more than one limit applies to the amount of adjustments to the interest rate after the initial adjustment, the greatest limit on subsequent adjustments must be disclosed. For example, if the initial interest rate adjustment is capped at two percent, the second adjustment is capped at two and a half percent, and all subsequent adjustments are capped at three percent, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(j)(6)(ii) states “3%.”

37(k) Contact information.

1. NMLSR ID. Section 1026.37(k) requires the disclosure of an Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System and Registry (NMLSR ID) number for each creditor, mortgage broker, and loan officer identified on the Loan Estimate. The NMLSR ID is a unique number or other identifier generally assigned to individuals registered or licensed through NMLSR to provide loan originating services. For more information, see the Secure and Fair Enforcement for Mortgage Licensing Act of 2008 (SAFE Act) sections 1503(3) and (12) and 1504 (12 U.S.C. 5102(3) and (12) and 5103), and its implementing regulations (i.e., 12 CFR 1007.103(a) and 1008.103(a)(2)). An entity may also have an NMLSR ID. Thus, if the creditor, mortgage broker, or loan officer has obtained an NMLSR ID, the NMLSR IDs must be provided in the disclosures required by § 1026.37(k)(1) and (2).

2. License number or unique identifier. Section 1026.37(k)(1) and (2) requires the disclosure of a license number or unique identifier for the creditor, mortgage broker, and loan officer if such entity or individual has not obtained an NMLSR ID. In such event, if the applicable State, locality, or other regulatory body with responsibility for licensing and/or registering such entity's or individual's business activities has issued a license number or other unique identifier to such entity or individual, that number is disclosed. In addition, § 1026.37(k)(1) and (2) require the abbreviation of the State of the jurisdiction or regulatory body that issued such license or registration is required to be included before the word “License” in the label required by § 1026.37(k)(1) and (2). If no such license or registration is required to be disclosed, such as if an NMLSR number is disclosed, the space provided for such an abbreviation in form H-24 of appendix H to this part may be left blank. A U.S. Postal Service State abbreviation complies with § 1026.37(k)(1) and (2), if applicable.

3. Contact. Section 1026.37(k)(2) requires the disclosure of the name and NMLSR ID of the person who is the primary contact for the consumer, labeled “Loan Officer.” The loan officer is generally the natural person employed by the creditor or mortgage broker disclosed under § 1026.37(k)(1) who interacts most frequently with the consumer and who has an NMLSR ID or, if none, a license number or other unique identifier to be disclosed under § 1026.37(k)(2), as applicable.

4. Email address and phone number. Section 1026.37(k)(3) requires disclosure of the loan officer's email address and phone number. Disclosure of a general number or email address for the loan officer's lender or mortgage broker, as applicable, satisfies this requirement if no such information is generally available for such person.

37(l) Comparisons.

37(l)(1) In five years.

1. Loans with terms of less than five years. In transactions with a scheduled loan term of less than 60 months, to comply with § 1026.37(l)(1), the creditor discloses the amounts paid through the end of the loan term.

Paragraph 37(l)(1)(i).

1. Calculation of total payments in five years. The amount disclosed under § 1026.37(l)(1)(i) is the sum of principal, interest, mortgage insurance, and loan costs scheduled to be paid through the end of the 60th month after the due date of the first periodic payment. For guidance on how to calculate interest for mortgage loans that are Adjustable Rate products under § 1026.37(a)(10)(i)(A) for purposes of § 1026.37(l)(1)(i), see comment 17(c)(1)-10. In addition, for purposes of § 1026.37(l)(1)(i), the creditor should assume that the consumer makes payments as scheduled and on time. For purposes of § 1026.37(l)(1)(i), mortgage insurance means “mortgage insurance or any functional equivalent” as defined under comment 37(c)(1)(i)(C)-1 and includes prepaid or escrowed mortgage insurance. Loan costs are those costs disclosed under § 1026.37(f).

2. Negative amortization loans. For loans that have a negative amortization feature under § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii)(A), the creditor calculates the total payments in five years using the scheduled payments, even if it is a negatively amortizing payment amount, until the consumer must begin making fully amortizing payments under the terms of the legal obligation.

Paragraph 37(l)(1)(ii).

1. Calculation of principal paid in five years. The disclosure required by § 1026.37(l)(1)(ii) is calculated in the same manner as the disclosure required by § 1026.37(l)(1)(i), except that the disclosed amount reflects only the total payments to principal through the end of the 60th month after the due date of the first periodic payment.

37(l)(3) Total interest percentage.

1. General. When calculating the total interest percentage, the creditor assumes that the consumer will make each payment in full and on time and will not make any additional payments. The creditor includes prepaid interest that the consumer will pay when calculating the total interest percentage. Prepaid interest that is disclosed as a negative number under §§ 1026.37(g)(2) or 1026.38(g)(2) is included as a negative value when calculating the total interest percentage.

2. Adjustable rate and step rate mortgages. For Adjustable Rate products under § 1026.37(a)(10)(i)(A), § 1026.37(l)(3) requires that the creditor compute the total interest percentage in accordance with comment 17(c)(1)-10. For Step Rate products under § 1026.37(a)(10)(i)(B), § 1026.37(l)(3) requires that the creditor compute the total interest percentage in accordance with § 1026.17(c)(1) and its associated commentary.

3. Negative amortization loans. For loans that have a negative amortization feature under § 1026.37(a)(10)(ii)(A), § 1026.37(l)(3) requires that the creditor compute the total interest percentage using the scheduled payment, even if it is a negatively amortizing payment amount, until the consumer must begin making fully amortizing payments under the terms of the legal obligation.

37(m) Other considerations.

37(m)(1) Appraisal.

1. Applicability. The disclosure required by § 1026.37(m)(1) is only applicable to transactions subject to § 1026.19(e) that are also subject either to 15 U.S.C. 1639h or 1691(e) or both, as implemented by this part or Regulation B, 12 CFR part 1002, respectively. Accordingly, if a transaction is not also subject to either or both of these provisions, as implemented by this part or Regulation B, respectively, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(m)(1) may be omitted from the Loan Estimate as described by comment 37-1 as illustrated by form H-24 of appendix H to this part. For transactions subject to section 1639h but not section 1691(e), the creditor may delete the word “promptly” from the disclosure required by § 1026.37(m)(1)(ii).

2. Consummation. Section 1026.37(m)(1) requires the creditor to disclose that it will provide a copy of any appraisal, even if the transaction is not consummated. On form H-24, the disclosure required by § 1026.37(m)(1) states that the creditor will provide an appraisal, even if the “loan does not close.” Pursuant to § 1026.37(o)(3), the disclosure required by § 1026.37(m)(1) is that illustrated by form H-24.

37(m)(2) Assumption.

1. Disclosure. Section 1026.37(m)(2) requires the creditor to disclose whether or not a third party may be allowed to assume the loan on its original terms if the property is sold or transferred by the consumer. In many cases, the creditor cannot determine, at the time the disclosure is made, whether a loan may be assumable at a future date on its original terms. For example, the assumption clause commonly used in mortgages sold to the Federal National Mortgage Association and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation conditions an assumption on a variety of factors, such as the creditworthiness of the subsequent borrower, the potential for impairment of the creditor's security, and the execution of an assumption agreement by the subsequent borrower. If the creditor can determine that such assumption is not permitted, the creditor complies with § 1026.37(m)(2) by disclosing that the loan is not assumable. In all other situations, including where assumption of a loan is permitted or is dependent on certain conditions or factors, or uncertainty exists as to the future assumability of a mortgage loan, the creditor complies with § 1026.37(m)(2) by disclosing that, under certain conditions, the creditor may allow a third party to assume the loan on its original terms.

2. Original terms. For purposes of § 1026.37(m)(2), the imposition of an assumption fee is not a departure from the original terms of the obligation but a modification of the legal obligation, such as a change in the contract interest rate, represents a departure from the original terms.

37(m)(3) Homeowner's insurance.

1. Optional disclosure. Section 1026.37(m)(3) provides that creditors may, but are not required to, disclose a statement of whether homeowner's insurance is required on the property and whether the consumer may choose the insurance provider, labeled “Homeowner's Insurance.”

2. Relation to the finance charge. Section 1026.4(d)(2) describes the conditions under which a creditor may exclude premiums for homeowner's insurance from the finance charge. For transactions subject to § 1026.19(e), a creditor satisfies § 1026.4(d)(2)(i) by disclosing the statement described in § 1026.37(m)(3).

37(m)(4) Late payment.

1. Definition. Section 1026.37(m)(4) requires a disclosure if charges are added to an individual delinquent installment by a creditor that otherwise considers the transaction ongoing on its original terms. Late payment charges do not include: (i) The right of acceleration; (ii) fees imposed for actual collection costs, such as repossession charges or attorney's fees; (iii) referral and extension charges; or (iv) the continued accrual of simple interest at the contract rate after the payment due date. However, an increase in the interest rate on account of a late payment by the consumer is a late payment charge to the extent of the increase.

2. Applicability of State law. Many State laws authorize the calculation of late charges as either a percentage of the delinquent payment amount or a specified dollar amount, and permit the imposition of the lesser or greater of the two calculations. The language provided in the disclosure may reflect the requirements and alternatives allowed under State law.

37(m)(6) Servicing.

1. Creditor's intent. Section 1026.37(m)(6) requires the creditor to disclose whether it intends to service the loan directly or transfer servicing to another servicer after consummation. A creditor complies with § 1026.37(m)(6) if the disclosure reflects the creditor's intent at the time the Loan Estimate is issued.

37(m)(7) Liability after foreclosure.

1. When statement is not permitted to be disclosed. The disclosure described by § 1026.37(m)(7) is required under the condition specified by § 1026.37(m)(7), specifically, if the purpose of the credit transaction is a refinance under § 1026.37(a)(9)(ii). Under any other conditions, this statement is not permitted to appear in the Loan Estimate.

37(m)(8) Construction loans.

1. Clear and conspicuous statement regarding redisclosure for construction loans. For construction loans in transactions involving new construction, where the creditor reasonably expects the settlement date to be 60 days or more after the provision of the disclosures required under § 1026.19(e)(1)(i), providing the statement, “You may receive a revised Loan Estimate at any time prior to 60 days before consummation” under the master heading “Additional Information About This Loan” and the heading “Other Considerations” pursuant to § 1026.37(m)(8) satisfies the requirements set forth in § 1026.19(e)(3)(iv)(F) that the statement be made clearly and conspicuously on the disclosure.

37(n) Signature statement.

1. Signature line optional. Whether a signature line is provided under § 1026.37(n) is determined solely by the creditor. If a signature line is provided, however, the disclosure must include the statement required by § 1026.37(n)(1).

2. Multiple consumers. If there is more than one consumer who will be obligated in the transaction, the first consumer signs as the applicant and each additional consumer signs as a co-applicant. If there is not enough space under the heading “Confirm Receipt” to provide signature lines for every consumer in the transaction, the creditor may add additional signature pages, as needed, at the end of the form for the remaining consumers' signatures. However, the creditor is required to disclose the heading and statement required by § 1026.37(n)(1) on such additional pages.

3. Consumer's name. The creditor may insert the consumer's name under the signature line, rather than using the designation “Applicant” or “Co-Applicant” as illustrated in form H-24 of appendix H to this part, but is not required to do so pursuant to § 1026.37(n)(1).

37(o) Form of disclosures.

37(o)(1) General requirements.

1. Clear and conspicuous; segregation. The clear and conspicuous standard requires that the disclosures required by § 1026.37 be legible and in a readily understandable form. Section 1026.37(o)(1)(i) requires that the disclosures be grouped together and segregated from everything else. For example, creditors may not add additional pages in between the pages of the Loan Estimate, or attach to the Loan Estimate additional pages that are not provided for under § 1026.37 after the last page of the Loan Estimate. As required by § 1026.37(o)(3)(i), the disclosures for any transaction that is a federally related mortgage loan under Regulation X, 12 CFR 1024.2, must be made using the standard form H-24 of appendix H to this part. Accordingly, use of that form constitutes compliance with the clear and conspicuous and segregation requirements of § 1026.37(o). In addition, § 1026.37(o)(1)(ii) requires creditors to disclose on the Loan Estimate only the information required by § 1026.37(a) through (n), except as otherwise provided by § 1026.37(o), and in the same order, and positioned relative to the master headings, headings, subheadings, labels, and similar designations in the same manner, as shown in form H-24, set forth in appendix H to this part. For example, creditors may not use form H-24, but include in the Loan Terms table under the subheading “Can this amount increase after closing?” information that is not required by § 1026.37(b)(6).

2. Balloon payment financing with leasing characteristics. In certain credit sale or loan transactions, a consumer may reduce the dollar amount of the payments to be made during the transaction by agreeing to make, at the end of the loan term, a large final payment based on the expected residual value of the property. The consumer may have a number of options with respect to the final payment, including, among other things, retaining the property and making the final payment, refinancing the final payment, or transferring the property to the creditor in lieu of the final payment. Such transactions may have some of the characteristics of lease transactions subject to Regulation M (12 CFR part 1013), but are considered credit transactions where the consumer assumes the indicia of ownership, including the risks, burdens, and benefits of ownership, upon consummation. These transactions are governed by the disclosure requirements of this part instead of Regulation M. Under § 1026.37(o)(1)(ii), creditors may not include any additional information with the disclosures required by § 1026.37, except as provided in § 1026.37(o)(5). Thus, the disclosures must show the large final payment as a balloon payment in the projected payments table required by § 1026.37(c) and should not, for example, reflect the other options available to the consumer at maturity.

37(o)(2) Headings and labels.

1. Estimated amounts. Section 1026.37(o)(2) incorporates the “estimated” designations reflected on form H-24 of appendix H to this part into the disclosure requirements of § 1026.37, even if the relevant provision of § 1026.37 does not expressly require or permit disclosure of the word “estimate.” Where form H-24 uses the abbreviation “est.” in place of the word “estimated,” § 1026.37(o)(2) also incorporates that designation into its requirement. For example, § 1026.37(c)(2)(iv) requires disclosure of the total periodic payment labeled “Total Monthly Payment,” but the label on form H-24 contains the designation “Estimated” and thus, the label required by § 1026.37(c)(2)(iv) must contain the designation “Estimated.” Although many of the disclosures required by § 1026.38 cross-reference their counterparts in § 1026.37, § 1026.38(t) incorporates the “estimated” designations reflected on form H-25, not form H-24.

37(o)(3) Form.

1. Non-federally related mortgage loans. For a non-federally related mortgage loan, the creditor is not required to use form H-24 of appendix H to this part, although its use as a model form for such transactions, if properly completed with accurate content, constitutes compliance with the clear and conspicuous and segregation requirements of § 1026.37(o)(1)(i). Even when the creditor elects not to use the model form, § 1026.37(o)(1) requires that the disclosures be grouped together and segregated from everything else; contain only the information required by § 1026.37(a) through (n); and be provided in the same order as they occur in form H-24, using the same relative positions of the headings, labels, and similar designations as shown in the form. In addition, § 1026.37(o)(2) requires that the creditor include the designation of “estimated” for all headings, subheading, labels, and similar designations required by § 1026.37 for which form H-24 contains the “estimated” designation in such heading, subheading, label, or similar designation. The disclosures required by § 1026.37 comply with the requirement to be in a format substantially similar to form H-24 when provided on letter size (8.5″ x 11″) paper.

37(o)(4) Rounding.

1. Rounding. Consistent with § 1026.2(b)(4), except as otherwise provided in § 1026.37(o)(4), any amount required to be disclosed by § 1026.37 is not permitted to be rounded and is disclosed using decimal places where applicable, unless otherwise provided.

2. Calculations. If a dollar amount that is required to be rounded by § 1026.37(o)(4)(i) on the Loan Estimate is a total of one or more dollar amounts that are not required or permitted to be rounded, the total amount must be rounded consistent with § 1026.37(o)(4)(i), but such component amounts used in the calculation must use such unrounded numbers. In addition, if any such unrounded component amount is required to be disclosed under § 1026.37, consistent with § 1026.2(b)(4), it should be disclosed as an unrounded number. If an amount that is required to be rounded by § 1026.37(o)(4)(i) on the Loan Estimate is a total of one or more components that are also required to be rounded by § 1026.37(o)(4)(i), the total amount must be calculated using such rounded amounts. For example, the subtotals required to be disclosed by § 1026.37(f)(1), (2), and (3) are calculated using the rounded amounts disclosed under those subsections. See also comment 37(o)(4)(i)(C)-1. However, the amounts required to be disclosed by § 1026.37(l) reference actual amounts for their components, rather than other amounts disclosed under § 1026.37 and rounded pursuant to § 1026.37(o)(4)(i), and thus, they are calculated using unrounded numbers.

37(o)(4)(i) Nearest dollar.

Paragraph 37(o)(4)(i)(A).

1. Rounding of dollar amounts. Section 1026.37(o)(4)(i)(A) requires that certain dollar amounts be rounded to the nearest whole dollar. For example, under § 1026.37(o)(4)(i)(A), periodic mortgage insurance payments are rounded and disclosed to the nearest dollar, such that a periodic mortgage insurance payment of $164.50 is disclosed under § 1026.37(c)(2)(ii) as $165, but a periodic mortgage insurance payment of $164.49 is disclosed as $164. The per-diem amount disclosed under § 1026.37(g)(2)(iii) and the monthly amounts for the initial escrow payment at closing disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(3)(i) through (iii) and (v) do not include partial cents. Dollar amounts are rounded or truncated to the nearest whole cent. For example, under § 1026.37(g)(2)(iii), the creditor discloses per-diem interest of $68.1254 as $68.13 or $68.12. See form H-24(B) in appendix H to this part for an illustration of per-diem amounts for homeowner's insurance disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(3)(i).

Paragraph 37(o)(4)(i)(B).

1. Rounding of loan amount. Section 1026.37(o)(4)(i)(B) requires the loan amount to be disclosed truncated at the decimal place if the loan amount is a whole number. For example, if § 1026.37(b)(1) requires disclosure of a loan amount of $481,516.23, the creditor discloses the amount as $481,516.23. However, if the loan amount required to be disclosed were $481,516.00, the creditor would disclose $481,516.

Paragraph 37(o)(4)(i)(C).

1. Rounding of the total monthly payment. Section 1026.37(o)(4)(i)(C) requires the total monthly payment amount disclosed under § 1026.37(c)(2)(iv) to be rounded if any of its components are rounded. For example, if the total monthly payment disclosed under § 1026.37(c)(2)(iv) is composed of a $2,000.49 periodic principal and interest payment required to be disclosed by § 1026.37(c)(2)(i) and a $164.49 periodic mortgage insurance payment required to be disclosed by § 1026.37(c)(2)(ii), the creditor would calculate the total monthly payment by adding the exact periodic principal and interest payment of $2,000.49 and the rounded periodic mortgage insurance payment of $164, round the total, and disclose $2,164.

37(o)(4)(ii) Percentages.

1. Decimal places. Section 1026.37(o)(4)(ii) requires the percentage amounts disclosed rounding exact amounts to three decimal places, but the creditor does not disclose trailing zeros to the right of the decimal point. For example, a 2.4999 percent annual percentage rate is disclosed as “2.5%” under § 1026.37(o)(4)(ii). Similarly, a 7.005 percent annual percentage rate is disclosed as “7.005%,” and a 7.000 percent annual percentage rate is disclosed as “7%.”

37(o)(5) Exceptions.

1. Permissible changes. The changes required or permitted by § 1026.37(o)(5) are permitted for federally related mortgage loans for which the use of form H-24 is required under § 1026.37(o)(3). For non-federally related mortgage loans, the changes required or permitted by § 1026.37(o)(5) do not affect the substance, clarity, or meaningful sequence of the disclosure and therefore, are permissible. Any changes to the disclosure not specified in § 1026.37(o)(5) or not permitted by other provisions of § 1026.37 are not permissible for federally related mortgage loans. Creditors in non-federally related mortgage loans making any changes that affect the substance, clarity, or meaningful sequence of the disclosure will lose their protection from civil liability under TILA section 130.

2. Manual completion. Section 1026.37(o) does not require the creditor to use a computer, typewriter, or other word processor to complete the disclosure form. The information and amounts required to be disclosed by § 1026.37 on form H-24 of appendix H to this part may be filled in by hand printing or using any other method, provided the information is clear and legible and complies with the formatting required by form H-24, including replicating bold font where required.

3. Contact information. If a transaction involves more than one creditor or mortgage broker, the space provided on form H-24 of appendix H to this part for the contact information required by § 1026.37(m) may be altered to add additional labels to accommodate the additional information of such parties, provided that the information required by § 1026.37(l), (m), and (n) are disclosed on the same page as illustrated by form H-24. If the space provided on form H-24 of appendix H to this part does not allow for the disclosure of such contact and other information on the same page, an additional page may be added to provide the required contact information with an appropriate reference to the additional page.

4. Unit-period. Section 1026.37(o)(5)(i) provides that wherever form H-24 or § 1026.37 uses “monthly” to describe the frequency of any payments or uses “month” to describe the applicable unit-period, the creditor is required to substitute the appropriate term to reflect the fact that the transaction's terms provide for other than monthly periodic payments, such as bi-weekly or quarterly payments. For purposes of § 1026.37, the term “unit-period” has the same meaning as in appendix J to Regulation Z.

5. Additional page. Information required or permitted to be disclosed by § 1026.37 on a separate page should be formatted similarly to form H-24 of appendix H to this part, so as not to affect the substance, clarity, or meaningful sequence of the disclosure. In addition, information provided on additional pages should be consolidated on as few pages as necessary to not affect the substance, clarity, or meaningful sequence of the disclosure.

6. Translation. Section 1026.37(o)(5)(ii) permits the translation of form H-24 into languages other than English, consistent with § 1026.27. Pursuant to § 1026.37(o)(5)(ii) creditors may modify form H-24 to the extent that translation prevents the headings, labels, designations, and required disclosure items under § 1026.37 from fitting in the space provided on form H-24. For example, if the translation of a required label does not fit within the line provided for such label in form H-24, the label may be disclosed over two lines. See form H-28 of appendix H to this part for Spanish translations of form H-24.