Speakers

Speakers consisted of local, national and international researchers from academia, government and non-profit agencies who presented their research in various areas of consumer finance.

Presenters

Dan Bartels

Bartels is an Assistant Professor who teaches Consumer Behavior at the University of Chicago Booth School Of Business. He completed his post-doctoral training at the Booth School of Business, and earned a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from Northwestern University. Bartels' interests include judgment and decision making, consumer behavior, moral psychology, and the psychology of concepts and categories.

To Know and To Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Savings
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Alexander L. Brown

Brown is an Associate Professor of economics at Texas A&M University. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from California Institute of Technology. Brown's research focuses broadly on topics in behavioral economics and experimental economics, including financial decision making.

Small Victories: Creating Intrinsic Motivation in Task Completion and Debt Repayment
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Andrew Caplin

Caplin is a Silver Professor of Economics at New York University, following previous academic appointments at Harvard, Princeton, and Columbia Universities. In current research, he engineers data to test new models of behavior. “Strategic Survey Questions” help us understand financial and health choices over the life cycle. They are implemented in the Vanguard Research Initiative, of which Caplin is co-PI. Richly engineered choice data enables testing of theories of rational inattention and search. Such data is generated at the Center for Experimental Social Science at NYU, which he co-directs. Data gathering and modeling in neuroeconomics and genoeconomics is fostered by the NYU neuroeconomics seminar, which Caplin co-organizes.

Long Term Care Insurance, Annuities, and the Under-Insurance Puzzle
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Bruce Carlin

Carlin is a finance professor from UCLA and conducts both theoretical and empirical studies of consumer financial decision-making and retail financial product markets. He is also a Faculty Research Associate at the NBER and a Director of the Financial Research Association. Carlin received his Ph.D. in Finance from Duke University, an MBA from Washington University of St. Louis, and M.D. from Northwestern University School of Medicine.

Learning Millennial-Style
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Marco Di Maggio

Di Maggio is an Assistant Professor of Finance and Economics at Columbia Business School. He received his Ph.D. from the MIT Economics Department in 2013 and focuses on macro-finance and financial intermediation in his studies. Di Maggio's research exploits micro data to investigate macro issues, such as the role of supply of credit in the boom and bust in economic activity, or the effects of monetary policy on the allocation of credit and in shaping households’ consumption behavior. He is also interested in how institutional investors and financial intermediaries affect the functioning of financial markets.

Credit-Induced Boom and Bust
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Stefan Hunt

Hunt is the Head of Behavioral Economics and Data Science at the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority. He runs a team that conducts rigorous research using methods from psychology and economics, and more recently data mining and analysis, to inform policy, supervision and enforcement decisions. Hunt received a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University, an Msc in economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a BA in experimental psychology and mathematics at Cambridge University.

The Impact of Access to Payday Loans on UK Consumer Borrowing Behavior and Credit Outcomes


Clinton Key

Key is a research officer for savings and financial security at the Pew Charitable Trusts. He develops rigorous data collection and analysis strategies to create a better understanding of household saving behavior and the role of savings in people’s lives. Key holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago and a master’s degree from the University of North Carolina.

Financial Security and Financial Shocks
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Ben Keys 

Keys is an assistant professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. He holds a bachelor's degree in economics and political science from Swarthmore College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. His recent research has focused on subprime mortgages, credit cards, personal bankruptcy, student loans, the unbanked, and alternative financial services.

Mortgage Rates, Household Balance Sheets, and the Real Economy
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Camelia Kuhnen

Dr. Kuhnen is an Associate Professor of Finance at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina, and the President of the Society for Neuroeconomics. She conducts experimental and field research focused on understanding how people make economic decisions in markets and firms. Dr. Kuhnen received her PhD in finance from the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and two bachelor's degrees – in finance and neuroscience – from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Stock Ownership and Learning from Financial Information
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Soren Leth-Petersen

Leth-Petersen is a professor economics at the University of Copenhagen. There he does research on consumption and savings and household finance, and in particular how savings behavior is related to house buying, the choice of mortgage, the development of house prices, and expectations to income. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Copenhagen.

Natural Born Delinquents: Evidence from the Universe of Loans in Denmark
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Ye Li

Li is an Assistant Professor of Management and Marketing at the University of California, Riverside. His research examines the affective, cognitive, and situational determinants of economic behaviors, especially intertemporal choices. Li received his B.S. in Economics and Electrical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology and his M.B.A. and Ph.D. in Behavioral Science from the University of Chicago, Booth School of Business. He was previously a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Columbia University’s Center for Decision Sciences.

Sound credit scores and financial decisions despite cognitive aging
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Ryan McDevitt

McDevitt is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. His research is in the field of empirical industrial organization and includes topics such as firms’ responses to changes in their reputations, the correlation between a firm’s name choice and its quality, firms' decisions to differentiate in health care and venture capital, the effect of social frictions on consumer behavior, and demand responses within alternative financial services. McDevitt received a B.A. from Williams College and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University, both in economics.

The Elasticity of Demand for Alternative Financial Services: Evidence from Check-Cashing Price Changes in the South Bronx
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John Mondragon

Mondragon is a PhD candidate in the Economics department at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his B.S. at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Mandragon is interested in macroeconomics and applied micro with specializations in household finance, default, and financial frictions.

Household Credit and Employment in the Great Recession
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Charles Nathanson

Nathanson is an Assistant Professor of Finance and Donald P. Jacobs Scholar at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His research interests include house pricing, housing dynamics, and taxation. Nathanson received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

An Extrapolative Model of House Price Dynamics
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Christopher Palmer 

Palmer is a professor of real estate at the University of California, Berkeley and conducts research on mortgage, housing, and labor markets. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a BA and BS in economics and mathematics at Brigham Young University.

Why did so many Subprime Borrowers Default during the Crisis: Loose Credit or Plummeting Prices?
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Felipe Severino

Severino is an assistant professor of business administration at Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College and conducts research on credit frictions for households and firms and the impact on the real economy. He received a Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a MSc and BSc from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Changes in Buyer Composition and the Expansion of Credit During the Boom
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Vincent Yao

Yao is Director of Credit Portfolio Management at Fannie Mae. He received a Ph.D. in economics from State University of New York at Albany, and a MA and BA in business and international economics at Renmin University of China.

Systematic Mistakes of Borrowers in the Mortgage Markets
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Stefan Zeisberger

Zeisberger is a professor and director of the Center for Behavioral Finance at Stony Brook University, New York and an Associate Lecturer at the Department of Banking and Finance at University of Zurich, Switzerland. He received his Ph.D. in Behavioral Finance at the University of Muenster. Zeisberger's research interests include behavioral finance, financial decision making, risk preferences and risk communication.

Simulated Experience and Investment Endurance
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Jonathan Zinman

Zinman is a Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College. His research focuses on household finance and behavioral economics, and he applies research by working with policymakers and practitioners around the globe. Zinman received a Ph.D. in economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a BA in government at Harvard College.

Unshrouding Effects on Demand for a Costly Add-on: Evidence from Bank Overdrafts in Turkey
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Discussants

Ling Ling Ang

Ang is an Economist in the Office of Research at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Her fields of interest include labor economics, consumer finance, public finance, and applied microeconomics. Before joining the Office of Research, Ang served as Financial Economist at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. She holds a B.S. and M.S. in mathematics from Loyola University Chicago and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.


Dustin Beckett

Beckett is an Economist in the Office of Research at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. His fields of interest include applied microeconomics and experimental economics. Beckett holds a B.A. in economics from Claremont McKenna College and a Ph.D. in social science from the California Institute of Technology.


Jonathan Lanning

Lanning is an Economist in the Office of Research at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. His fields of interest include labor economics, discrimination and inequality, and applied search theory. Before joining the Office of Research, Lanning served as an Assistant Professor of economics at Bryn Mawr College, an Assistant Professor of economics and management at Albion College, and a Faculty Associate at the Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He holds a B.A. in economics from Occidental College and both an M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.


Eva Nagypal

Nagypal is Senior Economist in the Office of Research at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Her fields of interest include labor economics, housing, macroeconomics, and consumer finance. Before joining the Office of Research, Nagypal served as an Associate Director at Navigant Economics and an Assistant Professor of economics at Northwestern University. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.


Jialan Wang

Wang is an Economist in the Office of Research at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Her fields of interest include payday lending, credit cards, consumer bankruptcy, and behavioral economics. Outside the Office of Research, Wang  has served as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and as an Assistant Professor of Finance at Washington University in St. Louis. She holds a B.S. in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in financial economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.