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Filed briefs

Amicus briefs filed by the CFPB are available on this page, including amicus briefs concerning federal consumer financial protection law filed in the U.S. Supreme Court by the Office of the Solicitor General.  

Use the filters below to browse by date, statute, and the court in which the brief was filed.

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7 filtered results
Category: Federal Circuit Court |
Date filed

Milgram v. JPMorgan Chase

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit

The Bureau filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit arguing that (1) the Fair Credit Reporting Act requires furnishers to conduct reasonable investigations of both legal and factual questions posted in consumer disputes, and (2) each time a furnisher fails to reasonably investigate a dispute results in a new statutory violation, with its own statute of limitations.

Category: Federal Circuit Court |
Date filed

Henderson v. The Source for Public Data, L.P., et al

4th Circuit Court of Appeals

The Bureau, the Federal Trade Commission, and the North Carolina Department of Justice jointly filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit arguing that Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act does not bar a private plaintiff's claims under the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

Category: Federal Circuit Court |
Date filed

Gross v. CitiMortgage

9th Circuit Court of Appeals

The Bureau filed an amicus brief arguing that the Fair Credit Reporting Act does not exempt “legal disputes” from its requirement that furnishers of information to consumer reporting agencies must reasonably investigate disputes about information they furnished.

Category: U.S. Supreme Court |
Date filed

TransUnion LLC v. Ramirez

United States Supreme Court

The government filed a brief with the Supreme Court in TransUnion v. Ramirez, arguing that a plaintiff class had Article III standing to sue under the Fair Credit Reporting Act where the defendant produced consumer reports that erroneously designated the class members as individuals who are legally barred from transacting business in the United States.