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§ 1026.7 Periodic statement.

The creditor shall furnish the consumer with a periodic statement that discloses the following items, to the extent applicable:

(a) Rules affecting home-equity plans. The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section apply only to home-equity plans subject to the requirements of § 1026.40. Alternatively, a creditor subject to this paragraph may, at its option, comply with any of the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section; however, any creditor that chooses not to provide a disclosure under paragraph (a)(7) of this section must comply with paragraph (b)(6) of this section.

(1) Previous balance. The account balance outstanding at the beginning of the billing cycle.

1. Credit balances. If the previous balance is a credit balance, it must be disclosed in such a way so as to inform the consumer that it is a credit balance, rather than a debit balance.

2. Multifeatured plans. In a multifeatured plan, the previous balance may be disclosed either as an aggregate balance for the account or as separate balances for each feature (for example, a previous balance for purchases and a previous balance for cash advances). If separate balances are disclosed, a total previous balance is optional.

3. Accrued finance charges allocated from payments. Some open-end credit plans provide that the amount of the finance charge that has accrued since the consumer's last payment is directly deducted from each new payment, rather than being separately added to each statement and reflected as an increase in the obligation. In such a plan, the previous balance need not reflect finance charges accrued since the last payment.

See interpretation of 7(a)(1) Previous Balance in Supplement I

(2) Identification of transactions. An identification of each credit transaction in accordance with § 1026.8.

1. Multifeatured plans. In identifying transactions under § 1026.7(a)(2) for multifeatured plans, creditors may, for example, choose to arrange transactions by feature (such as disclosing sale transactions separately from cash advance transactions) or in some other clear manner, such as by arranging the transactions in general chronological order.

2. Automated teller machine (ATM) charges imposed by other institutions in shared or interchange systems. A charge imposed on the cardholder by an institution other than the card issuer for the use of the other institution's ATM in a shared or interchange system and included by the terminal-operating institution in the amount of the transaction need not be separately disclosed on the periodic statement.

See interpretation of 7(a)(2) Identification of Transactions in Supplement I

(3) Credits. Any credit to the account during the billing cycle, including the amount and the date of crediting. The date need not be provided if a delay in accounting does not result in any finance or other charge.

1. Identification - sufficiency. The creditor need not describe each credit by type (returned merchandise, rebate of finance charge, etc.) - “credit” would suffice - except if the creditor is using the periodic statement to satisfy the billing-error correction notice requirement. (See the commentary to § 1026.13(e) and (f).)

2. Format. A creditor may list credits relating to credit extensions (payments, rebates, etc.) together with other types of credits (such as deposits to a checking account), as long as the entries are identified so as to inform the consumer which type of credit each entry represents.

3. Date. If only one date is disclosed (that is, the crediting date as required by the regulation), no further identification of that date is necessary. More than one date may be disclosed for a single entry, as long as it is clear which date represents the date on which credit was given.

4. Totals. A total of amounts credited during the billing cycle is not required.

See interpretation of 7(a)(3) Credits in Supplement I

(4) Periodic rates.

1. Disclosure of periodic rates - whether or not actually applied. Except as provided in § 1026.7(a)(4)(ii), any periodic rate that may be used to compute finance charges (and its corresponding annual percentage rate) must be disclosed whether or not it is applied during the billing cycle. For example:

i. If the consumer's account has both a purchase feature and a cash advance feature, the creditor must disclose the rate for each, even if the consumer only makes purchases on the account during the billing cycle.

ii. If the rate varies (such as when it is tied to a particular index), the creditor must disclose each rate in effect during the cycle for which the statement was issued.

2. Disclosure of periodic rates required only if imposition possible. With regard to the periodic rate disclosure (and its corresponding annual percentage rate), only rates that could have been imposed during the billing cycle reflected on the periodic statement need to be disclosed. For example:

i. If the creditor is changing rates effective during the next billing cycle (because of a variable-rate plan), the rates required to be disclosed under § 1026.7(a)(4) are only those in effect during the billing cycle reflected on the periodic statement. For example, if the monthly rate applied during May was 1.5%, but the creditor will increase the rate to 1.8% effective June 1, 1.5% (and its corresponding annual percentage rate) is the only required disclosure under § 1026.7(a)(4) for the periodic statement reflecting the May account activity.

ii. If rates applicable to a particular type of transaction changed after a certain date and the old rate is only being applied to transactions that took place prior to that date, the creditor need not continue to disclose the old rate for those consumers that have no outstanding balances to which that rate could be applied.

3. Multiple rates - same transaction. If two or more periodic rates are applied to the same balance for the same type of transaction (for example, if the finance charge consists of a monthly periodic rate of 1.5% applied to the outstanding balance and a required credit life insurance component calculated at 0.1% per month on the same outstanding balance), the creditor may do either of the following:

i. Disclose each periodic rate, the range of balances to which it is applicable, and the corresponding annual percentage rate for each. (For example, 1.5% monthly, 18% annual percentage rate; 0.1% monthly, 1.2% annual percentage rate.)

ii. Disclose one composite periodic rate (that is, 1.6% per month) along with the applicable range of balances and the corresponding annual percentage rate.

4. Corresponding annual percentage rate. In disclosing the annual percentage rate that corresponds to each periodic rate, the creditor may use “corresponding annual percentage rate,” “nominal annual percentage rate,” “corresponding nominal annual percentage rate,” or similar phrases.

5. Rate same as actual annual percentage rate. When the corresponding rate is the same as the annual percentage rate disclosed under § 1026.7(a)(7), the creditor need disclose only one annual percentage rate, but must use the phrase “annual percentage rate.”

6. Range of balances. See comment 6(a)(1)(ii)-1. A creditor is not required to adjust the range of balances disclosure to reflect the balance below which only a minimum charge applies.

See interpretation of 7(a)(4) Periodic Rates in Supplement I

(i) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(4)(ii) of this section, each periodic rate that may be used to compute the finance charge, the range of balances to which it is applicable, and the corresponding annual percentage rate. If no finance charge is imposed when the outstanding balance is less than a certain amount, the creditor is not required to disclose that fact, or the balance below which no finance charge will be imposed. If different periodic rates apply to different types of transactions, the types of transactions to which the periodic rates apply shall also be disclosed. For variable-rate plans, the fact that the periodic rate(s) may vary.

(ii) Exception. An annual percentage rate that differs from the rate that would otherwise apply and is offered only for a promotional period need not be disclosed except in periods in which the offered rate is actually applied.

(5) Balance on which finance charge computed. The amount of the balance to which a periodic rate was applied and an explanation of how that balance was determined. When a balance is determined without first deducting all credits and payments made during the billing cycle, the fact and the amount of the credits and payments shall be disclosed.

1. Limitation to periodic rates. Section 1026.7(a)(5) only requires disclosure of the balance(s) to which a periodic rate was applied and does not apply to balances on which other kinds of finance charges (such as transaction charges) were imposed. For example, if a consumer obtains a $1,500 cash advance subject to both a 1% transaction fee and a 1% monthly periodic rate, the creditor need only disclose the balance subject to the monthly rate (which might include portions of earlier cash advances not paid off in previous cycles).

2. Split rates applied to balance ranges. If split rates were applied to a balance because different portions of the balance fall within two or more balance ranges, the creditor need not separately disclose the portions of the balance subject to such different rates since the range of balances to which the rates apply has been separately disclosed. For example, a creditor could disclose a balance of $700 for purchases even though a monthly periodic rate of 1.5% applied to the first $500, and a monthly periodic rate of 1% to the remainder. This option to disclose a combined balance does not apply when the finance charge is computed by applying the split rates to each day's balance (in contrast, for example, to applying the rates to the average daily balance). In that case, the balances must be disclosed using any of the options that are available if two or more daily rates are imposed. (See comment 7(a)(5)-5.)

3. Monthly rate on average daily balance. Creditors may apply a monthly periodic rate to an average daily balance.

4. Multifeatured plans. In a multifeatured plan, the creditor must disclose a separate balance (or balances, as applicable) to which a periodic rate was applied for each feature or group of features subject to different periodic rates or different balance computation methods. Separate balances are not required, however, merely because a grace period is available for some features but not others. A total balance for the entire plan is optional. This does not affect how many balances the creditor must disclose - or may disclose - within each feature. (See, for example, comment 7(a)(5)-5.)

5. Daily rate on daily balances. If the finance charge is computed on the balance each day by application of one or more daily periodic rates, the balance on which the finance charge was computed may be disclosed in any of the following ways for each feature:

i. If a single daily periodic rate is imposed, the balance to which it is applicable may be stated as:

A. A balance for each day in the billing cycle.

B. A balance for each day in the billing cycle on which the balance in the account changes.

C. The sum of the daily balances during the billing cycle.

D. The average daily balance during the billing cycle, in which case the creditor shall explain that the average daily balance is or can be multiplied by the number of days in the billing cycle and the periodic rate applied to the product to determine the amount of the finance charge.

ii. If two or more daily periodic rates may be imposed, the balances to which the rates are applicable may be stated as:

A. A balance for each day in the billing cycle.

B. A balance for each day in the billing cycle on which the balance in the account changes.

C. Two or more average daily balances, each applicable to the daily periodic rates imposed for the time that those rates were in effect, as long as the creditor explains that the finance charge is or may be determined by (1) multiplying each of the average balances by the number of days in the billing cycle (or if the daily rate varied during the cycle, by multiplying by the number of days the applicable rate was in effect), (2) multiplying each of the results by the applicable daily periodic rate, and (3) adding these products together.

6. Explanation of balance computation method. See the commentary to 6(a)(1)(iii).

7. Information to compute balance. In connection with disclosing the finance charge balance, the creditor need not give the consumer all of the information necessary to compute the balance if that information is not otherwise required to be disclosed. For example, if current purchases are included from the date they are posted to the account, the posting date need not be disclosed.

8. Non-deduction of credits. The creditor need not specifically identify the total dollar amount of credits not deducted in computing the finance charge balance. Disclosure of the amount of credits not deducted is accomplished by listing the credits (§ 1026.7(a)(3)) and indicating which credits will not be deducted in determining the balance (for example, “credits after the 15th of the month are not deducted in computing the finance charge.”).

9. Use of one balance computation method explanation when multiple balances disclosed. Sometimes the creditor will disclose more than one balance to which a periodic rate was applied, even though each balance was computed using the same balance computation method. For example, if a plan involves purchases and cash advances that are subject to different rates, more than one balance must be disclosed, even though the same computation method is used for determining the balance for each feature. In these cases, one explanation of the balance computation method is sufficient. Sometimes the creditor separately discloses the portions of the balance that are subject to different rates because different portions of the balance fall within two or more balance ranges, even when a combined balance disclosure would be permitted under comment 7(a)(5)-2. In these cases, one explanation of the balance computation method is also sufficient (assuming, of course, that all portions of the balance were computed using the same method).

See interpretation of 7(a)(5) Balance on Which Finance Charge Computed in Supplement I

(6) Amount of finance charge and other charges. Creditors may comply with paragraphs (a)(6) of this section, or with paragraph (b)(6) of this section, at their option.

(i) Finance charges. The amount of any finance charge debited or added to the account during the billing cycle, using the term finance charge. The components of the finance charge shall be individually itemized and identified to show the amount(s) due to the application of any periodic rates and the amounts(s) of any other type of finance charge. If there is more than one periodic rate, the amount of the finance charge attributable to each rate need not be separately itemized and identified.

1. Total. A total finance charge amount for the plan is not required.

2. Itemization - types of finance charges. Each type of finance charge (such as periodic rates, transaction charges, and minimum charges) imposed during the cycle must be separately itemized; for example, disclosure of only a combined finance charge attributable to both a minimum charge and transaction charges would not be permissible. Finance charges of the same type may be disclosed, however, individually or as a total. For example, five transaction charges of $1 may be listed separately or as $5.

3. Itemization - different periodic rates. Whether different periodic rates are applicable to different types of transactions or to different balance ranges, the creditor may give the finance charge attributable to each rate or may give a total finance charge amount. For example, if a creditor charges 1.5% per month on the first $500 of a balance and 1% per month on amounts over $500, the creditor may itemize the two components ($7.50 and $1.00) of the $8.50 charge, or may disclose $8.50.

4. Multifeatured plans. In a multifeatured plan, in disclosing the amount of the finance charge attributable to the application of periodic rates no total periodic rate disclosure for the entire plan need be given.

5. Finance charges not added to account. A finance charge that is not included in the new balance because it is payable to a third party (such as required life insurance) must still be shown on the periodic statement as a finance charge.

6. Finance charges other than periodic rates. See comment 6(a)(1)(iv)-1 for examples.

7. Accrued finance charges allocated from payments. Some plans provide that the amount of the finance charge that has accrued since the consumer's last payment is directly deducted from each new payment, rather than being separately added to each statement and therefore reflected as an increase in the obligation. In such a plan, no disclosure is required of finance charges that have accrued since the last payment.

8. Start-up fees. Points, loan fees, and similar finance charges relating to the opening of the account that are paid prior to the issuance of the first periodic statement need not be disclosed on the periodic statement. If, however, these charges are financed as part of the plan, including charges that are paid out of the first advance, the charges must be disclosed as part of the finance charge on the first periodic statement. However, they need not be factored into the annual percentage rate. (See § 1026.14(c)(3).)

See interpretation of 7(a)(6)(i) Finance Charges in Supplement I

(ii) Other charges. The amounts, itemized and identified by type, of any charges other than finance charges debited to the account during the billing cycle.

1. Identification. In identifying any other charges actually imposed during the billing cycle, the type is adequately described as late charge or membership fee, for example. Similarly, closing costs or settlement costs, for example, may be used to describe charges imposed in connection with real estate transactions that are excluded from the finance charge under § 1026.4(c)(7), if the same term (such as closing costs) was used in the initial disclosures and if the creditor chose to itemize and individually disclose the costs included in that term. Even though the taxes and filing or notary fees excluded from the finance charge under § 1026.4(e) are not required to be disclosed as other charges under § 1026.6(a)(2), these charges may be included in the amount shown as closing costs or settlement costs on the periodic statement, if the charges were itemized and disclosed as part of the closing costs or settlement costs on the initial disclosure statement. (See comment 6(a)(2)-1 for examples of other charges.)

2. Date. The date of imposing or debiting other charges need not be disclosed.

3. Total. Disclosure of the total amount of other charges is optional.

4. Itemization - types of other charges. Each type of other charge (such as late-payment charges, over-the-credit-limit charges, and membership fees) imposed during the cycle must be separately itemized; for example, disclosure of only a total of other charges attributable to both an over-the-credit-limit charge and a late-payment charge would not be permissible. Other charges of the same type may be disclosed, however, individually or as a total. For example, three fees of $3 for providing copies related to the resolution of a billing error could be listed separately or as $9.

See interpretation of 7(a)(6)(ii) Other Charges in Supplement I

(7) Annual percentage rate. At a creditor's option, when a finance charge is imposed during the billing cycle, the annual percentage rate(s) determined under § 1026.14(c) using the term annual percentage rate.

1. Plans subject to the requirements of § 1026.40. For home-equity plans subject to the requirements of § 1026.40, creditors are not required to disclose an effective annual percentage rate. Creditors that state an annualized rate in addition to the corresponding annual percentage rate required by § 1026.7(a)(4) must calculate that rate in accordance with § 1026.14(c).

2. Labels. Creditors that choose to disclose an annual percentage rate calculated under § 1026.14(c) and label the figure as “annual percentage rate” must label the periodic rate expressed as an annualized rate as the “corresponding APR,” “nominal APR,” or a similar phrase as provided in comment 7(a)(4)-4. Creditors also comply with the label requirement if the rate calculated under § 1026.14(c) is described as the “effective APR” or something similar. For those creditors, the periodic rate expressed as an annualized rate could be labeled “annual percentage rate,” consistent with the requirement under § 1026.7(b)(4). If the two rates represent different values, creditors must label the rates differently to meet the clear and conspicuous standard under § 1026.5(a)(1).

See interpretation of 7(a)(7) Annual Percentage Rate in Supplement I

(8) Grace period. The date by which or the time period within which the new balance or any portion of the new balance must be paid to avoid additional finance charges. If such a time period is provided, a creditor may, at its option and without disclosure, impose no finance charge if payment is received after the time period's expiration.

1. Terminology. Although the creditor is required to indicate any time period the consumer may have to pay the balance outstanding without incurring additional finance charges, no specific wording is required, so long as the language used is consistent with that used on the account-opening disclosure statement. For example, “To avoid additional finance charges, pay the new balance before _” would suffice.

See interpretation of 7(a)(8) Grace Period in Supplement I

(9) Address for notice of billing errors. The address to be used for notice of billing errors. Alternatively, the address may be provided on the billing rights statement permitted by § 1026.9(a)(2).

1. Terminology. The periodic statement should indicate the general purpose for the address for billing-error inquiries, although a detailed explanation or particular wording is not required.

2. Telephone number. A telephone number, email address, or Web site location may be included, but the mailing address for billing-error inquiries, which is the required disclosure, must be clear and conspicuous. The address is deemed to be clear and conspicuous if a precautionary instruction is included that telephoning or notifying the creditor by email or Web site will not preserve the consumer's billing rights, unless the creditor has agreed to treat billing error notices provided by electronic means as written notices, in which case the precautionary instruction is required only for telephoning.

See interpretation of 7(a)(9) Address for Notice of Billing Errors in Supplement I

(10) Closing date of billing cycle; new balance. The closing date of the billing cycle and the account balance outstanding on that date.

1. Credit balances. See comment 7(a)(1)-1.

2. Multifeatured plans. In a multifeatured plan, the new balance may be disclosed for each feature or for the plan as a whole. If separate new balances are disclosed, a total new balance is optional.

3. Accrued finance charges allocated from payments. Some plans provide that the amount of the finance charge that has accrued since the consumer's last payment is directly deducted from each new payment, rather than being separately added to each statement and therefore reflected as an increase in the obligation. In such a plan, the new balance need not reflect finance charges accrued since the last payment.

See interpretation of 7(a)(10) Closing Date of Billing Cycle; New Balance in Supplement I

(b) Rules affecting open-end (not home-secured) plans. The requirements of paragraph (b) of this section apply only to plans other than home-equity plans subject to the requirements of § 1026.40.

1. Deferred interest or similar transactions. Creditors offer a variety of payment plans for purchases that permit consumers to avoid interest charges if the purchase balance is paid in full by a certain date. “Deferred interest” has the same meaning as in § 1026.16(h)(2) and associated commentary. The following provides guidance for a deferred interest or similar plan where, for example, no interest charge is imposed on a $500 purchase made in January if the $500 balance is paid by July 31.

i. Annual percentage rates. Under § 1026.7(b)(4), creditors must disclose each annual percentage rate that may be used to compute the interest charge. Under some plans with a deferred interest or similar feature, if the deferred interest balance is not paid by a certain date, July 31 in this example, interest charges applicable to the billing cycles between the date of purchase in January and July 31 may be imposed. Annual percentage rates that may apply to the deferred interest balance ($500 in this example) if the balance is not paid in full by July 31 must appear on periodic statements for the billing cycles between the date of purchase and July 31. However, if the consumer does not pay the deferred interest balance by July 31, the creditor is not required to identify, on the periodic statement disclosing the interest charge for the deferred interest balance, annual percentage rates that have been disclosed in previous billing cycles between the date of purchase and July 31.

ii. Balances subject to periodic rates. Under § 1026.7(b)(5), creditors must disclose the balances subject to interest during a billing cycle. The deferred interest balance ($500 in this example) is not subject to interest for billing cycles between the date of purchase and July 31 in this example. Periodic statements sent for those billing cycles should not include the deferred interest balance in the balance disclosed under § 1026.7(b)(5). This amount must be separately disclosed on periodic statements and identified by a term other than the term used to identify the balance disclosed under § 1026.7(b)(5) (such as “deferred interest balance”). During any billing cycle in which an interest charge on the deferred interest balance is debited to the account, the balance disclosed under § 1026.7(b)(5) should include the deferred interest balance for that billing cycle.

iii. Amount of interest charge. Under § 1026.7(b)(6)(ii), creditors must disclose interest charges imposed during a billing cycle. For some deferred interest purchases, the creditor may impose interest from the date of purchase if the deferred interest balance ($500 in this example) is not paid in full by July 31 in this example, but otherwise will not impose interest for billing cycles between the date of purchase and July 31. Periodic statements for billing cycles preceding July 31 in this example should not include in the interest charge disclosed under § 1026.7(b)(6)(ii) the amounts a consumer may owe if the deferred interest balance is not paid in full by July 31. In this example, the February periodic statement should not identify as interest charges interest attributable to the $500 January purchase. This amount must be separately disclosed on periodic statements and identified by a term other than “interest charge” (such as “contingent interest charge” or “deferred interest charge”). The interest charge on a deferred interest balance should be reflected on the periodic statement under § 1026.7(b)(6)(ii) for the billing cycle in which the interest charge is debited to the account.

iv. Due date to avoid obligation for finance charges under a deferred interest or similar program. Section 1026.7(b)(14) requires disclosure on periodic statements of the date by which any outstanding balance subject to a deferred interest or similar program must be paid in full in order to avoid the obligation for finance charges on such balance. This disclosure must appear on the front of any page of each periodic statement issued during the deferred interest period beginning with the first periodic statement issued during the deferred interest period that reflects the deferred interest or similar transaction.

See interpretation of 7(b) Rules Affecting Open-End (Not Home-Secured) Plans in Supplement I

(1) Previous balance. The account balance outstanding at the beginning of the billing cycle.

1. Credit balances. If the previous balance is a credit balance, it must be disclosed in such a way so as to inform the consumer that it is a credit balance, rather than a debit balance.

2. Multifeatured plans. In a multifeatured plan, the previous balance may be disclosed either as an aggregate balance for the account or as separate balances for each feature (for example, a previous balance for purchases and a previous balance for cash advances). If separate balances are disclosed, a total previous balance is optional.

3. Accrued finance charges allocated from payments. Some open-end credit plans provide that the amount of the finance charge that has accrued since the consumer's last payment is directly deducted from each new payment, rather than being separately added to each statement and reflected as an increase in the obligation. In such a plan, the previous balance need not reflect finance charges accrued since the last payment.

See interpretation of 7(b)(1) Previous Balance in Supplement I

(2) Identification of transactions. An identification of each credit transaction in accordance with § 1026.8.

1. Multifeatured plans. Creditors may, but are not required to, arrange transactions by feature (such as disclosing purchase transactions separately from cash advance transactions). Pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(6), however, creditors must group all fees and all interest separately from transactions and may not disclose any fees or interest charges with transactions.

2. Automated teller machine (ATM) charges imposed by other institutions in shared or interchange systems. A charge imposed on the cardholder by an institution other than the card issuer for the use of the other institution's ATM in a shared or interchange system and included by the terminal-operating institution in the amount of the transaction need not be separately disclosed on the periodic statement.

See interpretation of 7(b)(2) Identification of Transactions in Supplement I

(3) Credits. Any credit to the account during the billing cycle, including the amount and the date of crediting. The date need not be provided if a delay in crediting does not result in any finance or other charge.

1. Identification - sufficiency. The creditor need not describe each credit by type (returned merchandise, rebate of finance charge, etc.) - “credit” would suffice - except if the creditor is using the periodic statement to satisfy the billing-error correction notice requirement. (See the commentary to § 1026.13(e) and (f).) Credits may be distinguished from transactions in any way that is clear and conspicuous, for example, by use of debit and credit columns or by use of plus signs and/or minus signs.

2. Date. If only one date is disclosed (that is, the crediting date as required by the regulation), no further identification of that date is necessary. More than one date may be disclosed for a single entry, as long as it is clear which date represents the date on which credit was given.

3. Totals. A total of amounts credited during the billing cycle is not required.

See interpretation of 7(b)(3) Credits in Supplement I

(4) Periodic rates.

1. Disclosure of periodic interest rates - whether or not actually applied. Except as provided in § 1026.7(b)(4)(ii), any periodic interest rate that may be used to compute finance charges, expressed as and labeled “Annual Percentage Rate,” must be disclosed whether or not it is applied during the billing cycle. For example:

i. If the consumer's account has both a purchase feature and a cash advance feature, the creditor must disclose the annual percentage rate for each, even if the consumer only makes purchases on the account during the billing cycle.

ii. If the annual percentage rate varies (such as when it is tied to a particular index), the creditor must disclose each annual percentage rate in effect during the cycle for which the statement was issued.

2. Disclosure of periodic interest rates required only if imposition possible. With regard to the periodic interest rate disclosure (and its corresponding annual percentage rate), only rates that could have been imposed during the billing cycle reflected on the periodic statement need to be disclosed. For example:

i. If the creditor is changing annual percentage rates effective during the next billing cycle (either because it is changing terms or because of a variable-rate plan), the annual percentage rates required to be disclosed under § 1026.7(b)(4) are only those in effect during the billing cycle reflected on the periodic statement. For example, if the annual percentage rate applied during May was 18%, but the creditor will increase the rate to 21% effective June 1, 18% is the only required disclosure under § 1026.7(b)(4) for the periodic statement reflecting the May account activity.

ii. If the consumer has an overdraft line that might later be expanded upon the consumer's request to include secured advances, the rates for the secured advance feature need not be given until such time as the consumer has requested and received access to the additional feature.

iii. If annual percentage rates applicable to a particular type of transaction changed after a certain date and the old rate is only being applied to transactions that took place prior to that date, the creditor need not continue to disclose the old rate for those consumers that have no outstanding balances to which that rate could be applied.

3. Multiple rates - same transaction. If two or more periodic rates are applied to the same balance for the same type of transaction (for example, if the interest charge consists of a monthly periodic interest rate of 1.5% applied to the outstanding balance and a required credit life insurance component calculated at 0.1% per month on the same outstanding balance), creditors must disclose the periodic interest rate, expressed as an 18% annual percentage rate and the range of balances to which it is applicable. Costs attributable to the credit life insurance component must be disclosed as a fee under § 1026.7(b)(6)(iii).

4. Fees. Creditors that identify fees in accordance with § 1026.7(b)(6)(iii) need not identify the periodic rate at which a fee would accrue if the fee remains unpaid. For example, assume a fee is imposed for a late payment in the previous cycle and that the fee, unpaid, would be included in the purchases balance and accrue interest at the rate for purchases. The creditor need not separately disclose that the purchase rate applies to the portion of the purchases balance attributable to the unpaid fee.

5. Ranges of balances. See comment 6(b)(4)(i)(B)-1. A creditor is not required to adjust the range of balances disclosure to reflect the balance below which only a minimum charge applies.

6. Deferred interest transactions. See comment 7(b)-1.i.

See interpretation of 7(b)(4) Periodic Rates in Supplement I

(i) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(4)(ii) of this section, each periodic rate that may be used to compute the interest charge expressed as an annual percentage rate and using the term Annual Percentage Rate, along with the range of balances to which it is applicable. If no interest charge is imposed when the outstanding balance is less than a certain amount, the creditor is not required to disclose that fact, or the balance below which no interest charge will be imposed. The types of transactions to which the periodic rates apply shall also be disclosed. For variable-rate plans, the fact that the annual percentage rate may vary.

(ii) Exception. A promotional rate, as that term is defined in § 1026.16(g)(2)(i), is required to be disclosed only in periods in which the offered rate is actually applied.

(5) Balance on which finance charge computed. The amount of the balance to which a periodic rate was applied and an explanation of how that balance was determined, using the term Balance Subject to Interest Rate. When a balance is determined without first deducting all credits and payments made during the billing cycle, the fact and the amount of the credits and payments shall be disclosed. As an alternative to providing an explanation of how the balance was determined, a creditor that uses a balance computation method identified in § 1026.60(g) may, at the creditor's option, identify the name of the balance computation method and provide a toll-free telephone number where consumers may obtain from the creditor more information about the balance computation method and how resulting interest charges were determined. If the method used is not identified in § 1026.60(g), the creditor shall provide a brief explanation of the method used.

1. Split rates applied to balance ranges. If split rates were applied to a balance because different portions of the balance fall within two or more balance ranges, the creditor need not separately disclose the portions of the balance subject to such different rates since the range of balances to which the rates apply has been separately disclosed. For example, a creditor could disclose a balance of $700 for purchases even though a monthly periodic rate of 1.5% applied to the first $500, and a monthly periodic rate of 1% to the remainder. This option to disclose a combined balance does not apply when the interest charge is computed by applying the split rates to each day's balance (in contrast, for example, to applying the rates to the average daily balance). In that case, the balances must be disclosed using any of the options that are available if two or more daily rates are imposed. (See comment 7(b)(5)-4.)

2. Monthly rate on average daily balance. Creditors may apply a monthly periodic rate to an average daily balance.

3. Multifeatured plans. In a multifeatured plan, the creditor must disclose a separate balance (or balances, as applicable) to which a periodic rate was applied for each feature. Separate balances are not required, however, merely because a grace period is available for some features but not others. A total balance for the entire plan is optional. This does not affect how many balances the creditor must disclose - or may disclose - within each feature. (See, for example, comments 7(b)(5)-4 and 7(b)(4)-5.)

4. Daily rate on daily balance. If a finance charge is computed on the balance each day by application of one or more daily periodic interest rates, the balance on which the interest charge was computed may be disclosed in any of the following ways for each feature:

i. If a single daily periodic interest rate is imposed, the balance to which it is applicable may be stated as:

A. A balance for each day in the billing cycle.

B. A balance for each day in the billing cycle on which the balance in the account changes.

C. The sum of the daily balances during the billing cycle.

D. The average daily balance during the billing cycle, in which case the creditor may, at its option, explain that the average daily balance is or can be multiplied by the number of days in the billing cycle and the periodic rate applied to the product to determine the amount of interest.

ii. If two or more daily periodic interest rates may be imposed, the balances to which the rates are applicable may be stated as:

A. A balance for each day in the billing cycle.

B. A balance for each day in the billing cycle on which the balance in the account changes.

C. Two or more average daily balances, each applicable to the daily periodic interest rates imposed for the time that those rates were in effect. The creditor may, at its option, explain that interest is or may be determined by (1) multiplying each of the average balances by the number of days in the billing cycle (or if the daily rate varied during the cycle, by multiplying by the number of days the applicable rate was in effect), (2) multiplying each of the results by the applicable daily periodic rate, and (3) adding these products together.

5. Information to compute balance. In connection with disclosing the interest charge balance, the creditor need not give the consumer all of the information necessary to compute the balance if that information is not otherwise required to be disclosed. For example, if current purchases are included from the date they are posted to the account, the posting date need not be disclosed.

6. Non-deduction of credits. The creditor need not specifically identify the total dollar amount of credits not deducted in computing the finance charge balance. Disclosure of the amount of credits not deducted is accomplished by listing the credits (§ 1026.7(b)(3)) and indicating which credits will not be deducted in determining the balance (for example, “credits after the 15th of the month are not deducted in computing the interest charge.”).

7. Use of one balance computation method explanation when multiple balances disclosed. Sometimes the creditor will disclose more than one balance to which a periodic rate was applied, even though each balance was computed using the same balance computation method. For example, if a plan involves purchases and cash advances that are subject to different rates, more than one balance must be disclosed, even though the same computation method is used for determining the balance for each feature. In these cases, one explanation or a single identification of the name of the balance computation method is sufficient. Sometimes the creditor separately discloses the portions of the balance that are subject to different rates because different portions of the balance fall within two or more balance ranges, even when a combined balance disclosure would be permitted under comment 7(b)(5)-1. In these cases, one explanation or a single identification of the name of the balance computation method is also sufficient (assuming, of course, that all portions of the balance were computed using the same method). In these cases, a creditor may use an appropriate name listed in § 1026.60(g) (e.g., “average daily balance (including new purchases)”) as the single identification of the name of the balance computation method applicable to all features, even though the name only refers to purchases. For example, if a creditor uses the average daily balance method including new transactions for all features, a creditor may use the name “average daily balance (including new purchases)” listed in § 1026.60(g)(i) to satisfy the requirement to disclose the name of the balance computation method for all features. As an alternative, in this situation, a creditor may revise the balance computation names listed in § 1026.60(g) to refer more broadly to all new credit transactions, such as using the language “new transactions” or “current transactions” (e.g., “average daily balance (including new transactions)”), rather than simply referring to new purchases, when the same method is used to calculate the balances for all features of the account.

8. Use of balance computation names in § 1026.60(g) for balances other than purchases. The names of the balance computation methods listed in § 1026.60(g) describe balance computation methods for purchases. When a creditor is disclosing the name of the balance computation methods separately for each feature, in using the names listed in § 1026.60(g) to satisfy the requirements of § 1026.7(b)(5) for features other than purchases, a creditor must revise the names listed in § 1026.60(g) to refer to the other features. For example, when disclosing the name of the balance computation method applicable to cash advances, a creditor must revise the name listed in § 1026.60(g)(i) to disclose it as “average daily balance (including new cash advances)” when the balance for cash advances is figured by adding the outstanding balance (including new cash advances and deducting payments and credits) for each day in the billing cycle, and then dividing by the number of days in the billing cycle. Similarly, a creditor must revise the name listed in § 1026.60(g)(ii) to disclose it as “average daily balance (excluding new cash advances)” when the balance for cash advances is figured by adding the outstanding balance (excluding new cash advances and deducting payments and credits) for each day in the billing cycle, and then dividing by the number of days in the billing cycle. See comment 7(b)(5)-7 for guidance on the use of one balance computation method explanation or name when multiple balances are disclosed.

See interpretation of 7(b)(5) Balance on Which Finance Charge Computed in Supplement I

(6) Charges imposed.

1. Examples of charges. See commentary to § 1026.6(b)(3).

2. Fees. Costs attributable to periodic rates other than interest charges shall be disclosed as a fee. For example, if a consumer obtains credit life insurance that is calculated at 0.1% per month on an outstanding balance and a monthly interest rate of 1.5% applies to the same balance, the creditor must disclose the dollar cost attributable to interest as an “interest charge” and the credit insurance cost as a “fee.”

3. Total fees and interest charged for calendar year to date. i. Monthly statements. Some creditors send monthly statements but the statement periods do not coincide with the calendar month. For creditors sending monthly statements, the following comply with the requirement to provide calendar year-to-date totals.

A. A creditor may disclose calendar-year-to-date totals at the end of the calendar year by separately aggregating finance charges attributable to periodic interest rates and fees for 12 monthly cycles, starting with the period that begins during January and finishing with the period that begins during December. For example, if statement periods begin on the 10th day of each month, the statement covering December 10, 2011 through January 9, 2012, may disclose the separate year-to-date totals for interest charged and fees imposed from January 10, 2011, through January 9, 2012. Alternatively, the creditor could provide a statement for the cycle ending January 9, 2012, showing the separate year-to-date totals for interest charged and fees imposed January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2011.

B. A creditor may disclose calendar-year-to-date totals at the end of the calendar year by separately aggregating finance charges attributable to periodic interest rates and fees for 12 monthly cycles, starting with the period that begins during December and finishing with the period that begins during November. For example, if statement periods begin on the 10th day of each month, the statement covering November 10, 2011 through December 9, 2011, may disclose the separate year-to-date totals for interest charged and fees imposed from December 10, 2010, through December 9, 2011.

ii. Quarterly statements. Creditors issuing quarterly statements may apply the guidance set forth for monthly statements to comply with the requirement to provide calendar year-to-date totals on quarterly statements.

4. Minimum charge in lieu of interest. A minimum charge imposed if a charge would otherwise have been determined by applying a periodic rate to a balance except for the fact that such charge is smaller than the minimum must be disclosed as a fee. For example, assume a creditor imposes a minimum charge of $1.50 in lieu of interest if the calculated interest for a billing period is less than that minimum charge. If the interest calculated on a consumer's account for a particular billing period is 50 cents, the minimum charge of $1.50 would apply. In this case, the entire $1.50 would be disclosed as a fee; the periodic statement would reflect the $1.50 as a fee, and $0 in interest.

5. Adjustments to year-to-date totals. In some cases, a creditor may provide a statement for the current period reflecting that fees or interest charges imposed during a previous period were waived or reversed and credited to the account. Creditors may, but are not required to, reflect the adjustment in the year-to-date totals, nor, if an adjustment is made, to provide an explanation about the reason for the adjustment. Such adjustments should not affect the total fees or interest charges imposed for the current statement period.

6. Acquired accounts. An institution that acquires an account or plan must include, as applicable, fees and charges imposed on the account or plan prior to the acquisition in the aggregate disclosures provided under § 1026.7(b)(6) for the acquired account or plan. Alternatively, the institution may provide separate totals reflecting activity prior and subsequent to the account or plan acquisition. For example, a creditor that acquires an account or plan on August 12 of a given calendar year may provide one total for the period from January 1 to August 11 and a separate total for the period beginning on August 12.

7. Account upgrades. A creditor that upgrades, or otherwise changes, a consumer's plan to a different open-end credit plan must include, as applicable, fees and charges imposed for that portion of the calendar year prior to the upgrade or change in the consumer's plan in the aggregate disclosures provided pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(6) for the new plan. For example, assume a consumer has incurred $125 in fees for the calendar year to date for a retail credit card account, which is then replaced by a cobranded credit card account also issued by the creditor. In this case, the creditor must reflect the $125 in fees incurred prior to the replacement of the retail credit card account in the calendar year-to-date totals provided for the cobranded credit card account. Alternatively, the institution may provide two separate totals reflecting activity prior and subsequent to the plan upgrade or change.

See interpretation of 7(b)(6) Charges Imposed in Supplement I

(i) The amounts of any charges imposed as part of a plan as stated in § 1026.6(b)(3), grouped together, in proximity to transactions identified under paragraph (b)(2) of this section, substantially similar to Sample G-18(A) in appendix G to this part.

(ii) Interest. Finance charges attributable to periodic interest rates, using the term Interest Charge, must be grouped together under the heading Interest Charged, itemized and totaled by type of transaction, and a total of finance charges attributable to periodic interest rates, using the term Total Interest, must be disclosed for the statement period and calendar year to date, using a format substantially similar to Sample G-18(A) in appendix G to this part.

(iii) Fees. Charges imposed as part of the plan other than charges attributable to periodic interest rates must be grouped together under the heading Fees, identified consistent with the feature or type, and itemized, and a total of charges, using the term Fees, must be disclosed for the statement period and calendar year to date, using a format substantially similar to Sample G-18(A) in appendix G to this part.

(7) Change-in-terms and increased penalty rate summary for open-end (not home-secured) plans. Creditors that provide a change-in-terms notice required by § 1026.9(c), or a rate increase notice required by § 1026.9(g), on or with the periodic statement, must disclose the information in § 1026.9(c)(2)(iv)(A) and (c)(2)(iv)(B) (if applicable) or § 1026.9(g)(3)(i) on the periodic statement in accordance with the format requirements in § 1026.9(c)(2)(iv)(D), and § 1026.9(g)(3)(ii). See Forms G-18(F) and G-18(G) in appendix G to this part.

1. Location of summary tables. If a change-in-terms notice required by § 1026.9(c)(2) is provided on or with a periodic statement, a tabular summary of key changes must appear on the front of the statement. Similarly, if a notice of a rate increase due to delinquency or default or as a penalty required by § 1026.9(g)(1) is provided on or with a periodic statement, information required to be provided about the increase, presented in a table, must appear on the front of the statement.

See interpretation of 7(b)(7) Change-in-Terms and Increased Penalty Rate Summary for Open-End (Not Home-Secured) Plan in Supplement I

(8) Grace period. The date by which or the time period within which the new balance or any portion of the new balance must be paid to avoid additional finance charges. If such a time period is provided, a creditor may, at its option and without disclosure, impose no finance charge if payment is received after the time period's expiration.

1. Terminology. In describing the grace period, the language used must be consistent with that used on the account-opening disclosure statement. (See § 1026.5(a)(2)(i).)

2. Deferred interest transactions. See comment 7(b)-1.iv.

3. Limitation on the imposition of finance charges in § 1026.54. Section 1026.7(b)(8) does not require a card issuer to disclose the limitations on the imposition of finance charges as a result of a loss of a grace period in § 1026.54, or the impact of payment allocation on whether interest is charged on transactions as a result of a loss of a grace period.

See interpretation of 7(b)(8) Grace Period in Supplement I

(9) Address for notice of billing errors. The address to be used for notice of billing errors. Alternatively, the address may be provided on the billing rights statement permitted by § 1026.9(a)(2).

1. Terminology. The periodic statement should indicate the general purpose for the address for billing-error inquiries, although a detailed explanation or particular wording is not required.

2. Telephone number. A telephone number, email address, or Web site location may be included, but the mailing address for billing-error inquiries, which is the required disclosure, must be clear and conspicuous. The address is deemed to be clear and conspicuous if a precautionary instruction is included that telephoning or notifying the creditor by email or Web site will not preserve the consumer's billing rights, unless the creditor has agreed to treat billing error notices provided by electronic means as written notices, in which case the precautionary instruction is required only for telephoning.

See interpretation of 7(b)(9) Address for Notice of Billing Errors in Supplement I

(10) Closing date of billing cycle; new balance. The closing date of the billing cycle and the account balance outstanding on that date. The new balance must be disclosed in accordance with the format requirements of paragraph (b)(13) of this section.

1. Credit balances. See comment 7(b)(1)-1.

2. Multifeatured plans. In a multifeatured plan, the new balance may be disclosed for each feature or for the plan as a whole. If separate new balances are disclosed, a total new balance is optional.

3. Accrued finance charges allocated from payments. Some plans provide that the amount of the finance charge that has accrued since the consumer's last payment is directly deducted from each new payment, rather than being separately added to each statement and therefore reflected as an increase in the obligation. In such a plan, the new balance need not reflect finance charges accrued since the last payment.

See interpretation of 7(b)(10) Closing Date of Billing Cycle; New Balance in Supplement I

(11) Due date; late payment costs.

1. Informal periods affecting late payments. Although the terms of the account agreement may provide that a card issuer may assess a late payment fee if a payment is not received by a certain date, the card issuer may have an informal policy or practice that delays the assessment of the late payment fee for payments received a brief period of time after the date upon which a card issuer has the contractual right to impose the fee. A card issuer must disclose the due date according to the legal obligation between the parties, and need not consider the end of an informal “courtesy period” as the due date under § 1026.7(b)(11).

2. Assessment of late payment fees. Some state or other laws require that a certain number of days must elapse following a due date before a late payment fee may be imposed. In addition, a card issuer may be restricted by the terms of the account agreement from imposing a late payment fee until a payment is late for a certain number of days following a due date. For example, assume a payment is due on March 10 and the account agreement or state law provides that a late payment fee cannot be assessed before March 21. A card issuer must disclose the due date under the terms of the legal obligation (March 10 in this example), and not a date different than the due date, such as when the card issuer is restricted by the account agreement or state or other law from imposing a late payment fee unless a payment is late for a certain number of days following the due date (March 21 in this example). Consumers' rights under state law to avoid the imposition of late payment fees during a specified period following a due date are unaffected by the disclosure requirement. In this example, the card issuer would disclose March 10 as the due date for purposes of § 1026.7(b)(11), but could not, under state law, assess a late payment fee before March 21.

3. Fee or rate triggered by multiple events. If a late payment fee or penalty rate is triggered after multiple events, such as two late payments in six months, the card issuer may, but is not required to, disclose the late payment and penalty rate disclosure each month. The disclosures must be included on any periodic statement for which a late payment could trigger the late payment fee or penalty rate, such as after the consumer made one late payment in this example. For example, if a cardholder has already made one late payment, the disclosure must be on each statement for the following five billing cycles.

4. Range of late fees or penalty rates. A card issuer that imposes a range of late payment fees or rates on a credit card account under an open-end (not home-secured) consumer credit plan may state the highest fee or rate along with an indication lower fees or rates could be imposed. For example, a phrase indicating the late payment fee could be “up to $29” complies with this requirement.

5. Penalty rate in effect. If the highest penalty rate has previously been triggered on an account, the card issuer may, but is not required to, delete the amount of the penalty rate and the warning that the rate may be imposed for an untimely payment, as not applicable. Alternatively, the card issuer may, but is not required to, modify the language to indicate that the penalty rate has been increased due to previous late payments (if applicable).

6. Same day each month. The requirement that the due date be the same day each month means that the due date must generally be the same numerical date. For example, a consumer's due date could be the 25th of every month. In contrast, a due date that is the same relative date but not numerical date each month, such as the third Tuesday of the month, generally would not comply with this requirement. However, a consumer's due date may be the last day of each month, even though that date will not be the same numerical date. For example, if a consumer's due date is the last day of each month, it will fall on February 28th (or February 29th in a leap year) and on August 31st.

7. Change in due date. A creditor may adjust a consumer's due date from time to time provided that the new due date will be the same numerical date each month on an ongoing basis. For example, a creditor may choose to honor a consumer's request to change from a due date that is the 20th of each month to the 5th of each month, or may choose to change a consumer's due date from time to time for operational reasons. See comment 2(a)(4)-3 for guidance on transitional billing cycles.

8. Billing cycles longer than one month. The requirement that the due date be the same day each month does not prohibit billing cycles that are two or three months, provided that the due date for each billing cycle is on the same numerical date of the month. For example, a creditor that establishes two-month billing cycles could send a consumer periodic statements disclosing due dates of January 25, March 25, and May 25.

9. Payment due date when the creditor does not accept or receive payments by mail. If the due date in a given month falls on a day on which the creditor does not receive or accept payments by mail and the creditor is required to treat a payment received the next business day as timely pursuant to § 1026.10(d), the creditor must disclose the due date according to the legal obligation between the parties, not the date as of which the creditor is permitted to treat the payment as late. For example, assume that the consumer's due date is the 4th of every month and the creditor does not accept or receive payments by mail on Thursday, July 4. Pursuant to § 1026.10(d), the creditor may not treat a mailed payment received on the following business day, Friday, July 5, as late for any purpose. The creditor must nonetheless disclose July 4 as the due date on the periodic statement and may not disclose a July 5 due date.

See interpretation of 7(b)(11) Due Date; Late Payment Costs in Supplement I

(i) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(11)(ii) of this section and in accordance with the format requirements in paragraph (b)(13) of this section, for a credit card account under an open-end (not home-secured) consumer credit plan, a card issuer must provide on each periodic statement:

(A) The due date for a payment. The due date disclosed pursuant to this paragraph shall be the same day of the month for each billing cycle.

(B) The amount of any late payment fee and any increased periodic rate(s) (expressed as an annual percentage rate(s)) that may be imposed on the account as a result of a late payment. If a range of late payment fees may be assessed, the card issuer may state the range of fees, or the highest fee and an indication that the fee imposed could be lower. If the rate may be increased for more than one feature or balance, the card issuer may state the range of rates or the highest rate that could apply and at the issuer's option an indication that the rate imposed could be lower.

(ii) Exception. The requirements of paragraph (b)(11)(i) of this section do not apply to the following:

(A) Periodic statements provided solely for charge card accounts, other than covered separate credit features that are charge card accounts accessible by hybrid prepaid-credit cards as defined in § 1026.61; and

(B) Periodic statements provided for a charged-off account where payment of the entire account balance is due immediately.

(12) Repayment disclosures

1. Rounding. In disclosing on the periodic statement the minimum payment total cost estimate, the estimated monthly payment for repayment in 36 months, the total cost estimate for repayment in 36 months, and the savings estimate for repayment in 36 months under § 1026.7(b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii) as applicable, a card issuer, at its option, must either round these disclosures to the nearest whole dollar or to the nearest cent. Nonetheless, an issuer's rounding for all of these disclosures must be consistent. An issuer may round all of these disclosures to the nearest whole dollar when disclosing them on the periodic statement, or may round all of these disclosures to the nearest cent. An issuer may not, however, round some of the disclosures to the nearest whole dollar, while rounding other disclosures to the nearest cent.

See interpretation of 7(b)(12) Repayment Disclosures in Supplement I

(i) In general. Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(12)(ii) and (b)(12)(v) of this section, for a credit card account under an open-end (not home-secured) consumer credit plan, a card issuer must provide the following disclosures on each periodic statement:

(A) The following statement with a bold heading: “Minimum Payment Warning: If you make only the minimum payment each period, you will pay more in interest and it will take you longer to pay off your balance;”

(B) The minimum payment repayment estimate, as described in appendix M1 to this part. If the minimum payment repayment estimate is less than 2 years, the card issuer must disclose the estimate in months. Otherwise, the estimate must be disclosed in years and rounded to the nearest whole year;

(C) The minimum payment total cost estimate, as described in appendix M1 to this part. The minimum payment total cost estimate must be rounded either to the nearest whole dollar or to the nearest cent, at the card issuer's option;

(D) A statement that the minimum payment repayment estimate and the minimum payment total cost estimate are based on the current outstanding balance shown on the periodic statement. A statement that the minimum payment repayment estimate and the minimum payment total cost estimate are based on the assumption that only minimum payments are made and no other amounts are added to the balance;

(E) A toll-free telephone number where the consumer may obtain from the card issuer information about credit counseling services consistent with paragraph (b)(12)(iv) of this section; and

(F)

1. Minimum payment repayment estimate disclosed on the periodic statement is three years or less. Section 1026.7(b)(12)(i)(F)(2)(i) provides that a credit card issuer is not required to provide the disclosures related to repayment in 36 months if the minimum payment repayment estimate disclosed under § 1026.7(b)(12)(i)(B) after rounding is 3 years or less. For example, if the minimum payment repayment estimate is 2 years 6 months to 3 years 5 months, issuers would be required under § 1026.7(b)(12)(i)(B) to disclose that it would take 3 years to pay off the balance in full if making only the minimum payment. In these cases, an issuer would not be required to disclose the 36-month disclosures on the periodic statement because the minimum payment repayment estimate disclosed to the consumer on the periodic statement (after rounding) is 3 years or less.

See interpretation of Paragraph 7(b)(12)(i)(F) in Supplement I

(1) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(12)(i)(F)(2) of this section, the following disclosures:

(i) The estimated monthly payment for repayment in 36 months, as described in appendix M1 to this part. The estimated monthly payment for repayment in 36 months must be rounded either to the nearest whole dollar or to the nearest cent, at the card issuer's option;

(ii) A statement that the card issuer estimates that the consumer will repay the outstanding balance shown on the periodic statement in 3 years if the consumer pays the estimated monthly payment each month for 3 years;

(iii) The total cost estimate for repayment in 36 months, as described in appendix M1 to this part. The total cost estimate for repayment in 36 months must be rounded either to the nearest whole dollar or to the nearest cent, at the card issuer's option; and

(iv) The savings estimate for repayment in 36 months, as described in appendix M1 to this part. The savings estimate for repayment in 36 months must be rounded either to the nearest whole dollar or to the nearest cent, at the card issuer's option.

(2) The requirements of paragraph (b)(12)(i)(F)(1) of this section do not apply to a periodic statement in any of the following circumstances:

(i) The minimum payment repayment estimate that is disclosed on the periodic statement pursuant to paragraph (b)(12)(i)(B) of this section after rounding is three years or less;

(ii) The estimated monthly payment for repayment in 36 months, as described in appendix M1 to this part, after rounding as set forth in paragraph (b)(12)(i)(F)(1)(i) of this section that is calculated for a particular billing cycle is less than the minimum payment required for the plan for that billing cycle; and

(iii) A billing cycle where an account has both a balance in a revolving feature where the required minimum payments for this feature will not amortize that balance in a fixed amount of time specified in the account agreement and a balance in a fixed repayment feature where the required minimum payment for this fixed repayment feature will amortize that balance in a fixed amount of time specified in the account agreement which is less than 36 months.

(ii) Negative or no amortization. If negative or no amortization occurs when calculating the minimum payment repayment estimate as described in appendix M1 of this part, a card issuer must provide the following disclosures on the periodic statement instead of the disclosures set forth in paragraph (b)(12)(i) of this section:

(A) The following statement: “Minimum Payment Warning: Even if you make no more charges using this card, if you make only the minimum payment each month we estimate you will never pay off the balance shown on this statement because your payment will be less than the interest charged each month”;

(B) The following statement: “If you make more than the minimum payment each period, you will pay less in interest and pay off your balance sooner”;

(C) The estimated monthly payment for repayment in 36 months, as described in appendix M1 to this part. The estimated monthly payment for repayment in 36 months must be rounded either to the nearest whole dollar or to the nearest cent, at the issuer's option;

(D) A statement that the card issuer estimates that the consumer will repay the outstanding balance shown on the periodic statement in 3 years if the consumer pays the estimated monthly payment each month for 3 years; and

(E) A toll-free telephone number where the consumer may obtain from the card issuer information about credit counseling services consistent with paragraph (b)(12)(iv) of this section.

(iii) Format requirements. A card issuer must provide the disclosures required by paragraph (b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii) of this section in accordance with the format requirements of paragraph (b)(13) of this section, and in a format substantially similar to Samples G-18(C)(1), G-18(C)(2) and G-18(C)(3) in appendix G to this part, as applicable.

(iv) Provision of information about credit counseling services

1. Approved organizations. Section 1026.7(b)(12)(iv)(A) requires card issuers to provide information regarding at least three organizations that have been approved by the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator pursuant to 11 U.S.C. 111(a)(1) to provide credit counseling services in, at the card issuer's option, either the state in which the billing address for the account is located or the state specified by the consumer. A card issuer does not satisfy the requirements in § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv)(A) by providing information regarding providers that have been approved pursuant to 11 U.S.C. 111(a)(2) to offer personal financial management courses.

2. Information regarding approved organizations. i. Provision of information obtained from United States Trustee or bankruptcy administrator. A card issuer complies with the requirements of § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv)(A) if, through the toll-free number disclosed pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii), it provides the consumer with information obtained from the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator, such as information obtained from the Web site operated by the United States Trustee. Section 1026.7(b)(12)(iv)(A) does not require a card issuer to provide information that is not available from the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator. If, for example, the Web site address for an organization approved by the United States Trustee is not available from the Web site operated by the United States Trustee, a card issuer is not required to provide a Web site address for that organization. However, § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv)(B) requires the card issuer to, at least annually, update the information it provides for consistency with the information provided by the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator.

ii. Provision of information consistent with request of approved organization. If requested by an approved organization, a card issuer may at its option provide, in addition to the name of the organization obtained from the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator, another name used by that organization through the toll-free number disclosed pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii). In addition, if requested by an approved organization, a card issuer may at its option provide through the toll-free number disclosed pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii) a street address, telephone number, or Web site address for the organization that is different than the street address, telephone number, or Web site address obtained from the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator. However, if requested by an approved organization, a card issuer must not provide information regarding that organization through the toll-free number disclosed pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii).

iii. Information regarding approved organizations that provide credit counseling services in a language other than English. A card issuer may at its option provide through the toll-free number disclosed pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii) information regarding approved organizations that provide credit counseling services in languages other than English. In the alternative, a card issuer may at its option state that such information is available from the Web site operated by the United States Trustee. Disclosing this Web site address does not by itself constitute a statement that organizations have been approved by the United States Trustee for purposes of comment 7(b)(12)(iv)-2.iv.

iv. Statements regarding approval by the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator. Section 1026.7(b)(12)(iv) does not require a card issuer to disclose through the toll-free number disclosed pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii) that organizations have been approved by the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator. However, if a card issuer chooses to make such a disclosure, § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv) requires that the card issuer also disclose that:

A. The United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator has determined that the organizations meet the minimum requirements for nonprofit pre-bankruptcy budget and credit counseling;

B. The organizations may provide other credit counseling services that have not been reviewed by the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator; and

C. The United States Trustee or the bankruptcy administrator does not endorse or recommend any particular organization.

3. Automated response systems or devices. At their option, card issuers may use toll-free telephone numbers that connect consumers to automated systems, such as an interactive voice response system, through which consumers may obtain the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv) by inputting information using a touch-tone telephone or similar device.

4. Toll-free telephone number. A card issuer may provide a toll-free telephone number that is designed to handle customer service calls generally, so long as the option to receive the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv) is prominently disclosed to the consumer. For automated systems, the option to receive the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv) is prominently disclosed to the consumer if it is listed as one of the options in the first menu of options given to the consumer, such as “Press or say ‘3’ if you would like information about credit counseling services.” If the automated system permits callers to select the language in which the call is conducted and in which information is provided, the menu to select the language may precede the menu with the option to receive information about accessing credit counseling services.

5. Third parties. At their option, card issuers may use a third party to establish and maintain a toll-free telephone number for use by the issuer to provide the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv).

6. Web site address. When making the repayment disclosures on the periodic statement pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(12), a card issuer at its option may also include a reference to a Web site address (in addition to the toll-free telephone number) where its customers may obtain the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv), so long as the information provided on the Web site complies with § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv). The Web site address disclosed must take consumers directly to the Web page where information about accessing credit counseling may be obtained. In the alternative, the card issuer may disclose the Web site address for the Web page operated by the United States Trustee where consumers may obtain information about approved credit counseling organizations. Disclosing this Web site address does not by itself constitute a statement that organizations have been approved by the United States Trustee for purposes of comment 7(b)(12)(iv)-2.iv.

7. Advertising or marketing information. If a consumer requests information about credit counseling services, the card issuer may not provide advertisements or marketing materials to the consumer (except for providing the name of the issuer) prior to providing the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv). Educational materials that do not solicit business are not considered advertisements or marketing materials for this purpose. Examples:

i. Toll-free telephone number. As described in comment 7(b)(12)(iv)-4, an issuer may provide a toll-free telephone number that is designed to handle customer service calls generally, so long as the option to receive the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv) through that toll-free telephone number is prominently disclosed to the consumer. Once the consumer selects the option to receive the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv), the issuer may not provide advertisements or marketing materials to the consumer (except for providing the name of the issuer) prior to providing the required information.

ii. Web page. If the issuer discloses a link to a Web site address as part of the disclosures pursuant to comment 7(b)(12)(iv)-6, the issuer may not provide advertisements or marketing materials (except for providing the name of the issuer) on the Web page accessed by the address prior to providing the information required by § 1026.7(b)(12)(iv).

See interpretation of 7(b)(12)(iv) Provision of Information About Credit Counseling Services in Supplement I

(A) Required information. To the extent available from the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator, a card issuer must provide through the toll-free telephone number disclosed pursuant to paragraphs (b)(12)(i) or (b)(12)(ii) of this section the name, street address, telephone number, and Web site address for at least three organizations that have been approved by the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator pursuant to 11 U.S.C. 111(a)(1) to provide credit counseling services in, at the card issuer's option, either the state in which the billing address for the account is located or the state specified by the consumer.

(B) Updating required information. At least annually, a card issuer must update the information provided pursuant to paragraph (b)(12)(iv)(A) of this section for consistency with the information available from the United States Trustee or a bankruptcy administrator.

(v) Exemptions. Paragraph (b)(12) of this section does not apply to:

1. **Billing cycle where paying the minimum payment due for that billing cycle will pay the

See interpretation of 7(b)(12)(v) Exemptions in Supplement I

(A) Charge card accounts that require payment of outstanding balances in full at the end of each billing cycle;

(B) A billing cycle immediately following two consecutive billing cycles in which the consumer paid the entire balance in full, had a zero outstanding balance or had a credit balance; and

(C) A billing cycle where paying the minimum payment due for that billing cycle will pay the entire outstanding balance on the account for that billing cycle.

(13) Format requirements. The due date required by paragraph (b)(11) of this section shall be disclosed on the front of the first page of the periodic statement. The amount of the late payment fee and the annual percentage rate(s) required by paragraph (b)(11) of this section shall be stated in close proximity to the due date. The ending balance required by paragraph (b)(10) of this section and the disclosures required by paragraph (b)(12) of this section shall be disclosed closely proximate to the minimum payment due. The due date, late payment fee and annual percentage rate, ending balance, minimum payment due, and disclosures required by paragraph (b)(12) of this section shall be grouped together. Sample G-18(D) in appendix G to this part sets forth an example of how these terms may be grouped.

1. Combined asset account and credit account statements. Some financial institutions provide information about deposit account and open-end credit account activity on one periodic statement. For purposes of providing disclosures on the front of the first page of the periodic statement pursuant to § 1026.7(b)(13), the first page of such a combined statement shall be the page on which credit transactions first appear. This guidance also applies to financial institutions that provide information about prepaid accounts and account activity in connection with covered separate credit features accessible by hybrid prepaid-credit cards as defined in § 1026.61 on one periodic statement.

See interpretation of 7(b)(13) Format Requirements in Supplement I

(14) Deferred interest or similar transactions. For accounts with an outstanding balance subject to a deferred interest or similar program, the date by which that outstanding balance must be paid in full in order to avoid the obligation to pay finance charges on such balance must be disclosed on the front of any page of each periodic statement issued during the deferred interest period beginning with the first periodic statement issued during the deferred interest period that reflects the deferred interest or similar transaction. The disclosure provided pursuant to this paragraph must be substantially similar to Sample G-18(H) in appendix G to this part.