Archive of closed notices

The notices listed below are no longer open for public comment. Select a document title to read the full text of the notice or the comments that were received.

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Request for Information on Payday Loans, Vehicle Title Loans, Installment Loans, and Open-End Lines of Credit

The CFPB seeks feedback on practices and products that are related to but may not be addressed in the Bureau's concurrently published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Payday, Vehicle Title, and Certain High-Cost Installment Loans (concurrent proposal).

Amendments to the 2013 Mortgage Servicing Rules under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (Regulation X) and the Truth in Lending Act (Regulation Z)

The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) is reopening the comment period for a specific aspect of the proposed rule published by the Bureau in the Federal Register on December 15, 2014. The Bureau conducted consumer testing of sample periodic statement forms for consumers in bankruptcy after the close of the original comment period. The Bureau now reopens the comment period until May 26, 2016 to seek comment specifically on the report summarizing consumer testing of sample periodic statement forms for consumers in bankruptcy.

60-Day PRA: Regulation I: Disclosure Requirements for Depository Institutions Lacking Federal Deposit Insurance (12 CFR 1009)

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (Bureau) is proposing a new information collection titled, “Regulation I: Disclosure Requirements for Depository Institutions Lacking Federal Deposit Insurance (12 CFR 1009).”

Amendment to the Annual Privacy Notice Requirement Under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (Regulation P) - Extension of Comment Period

On May 13, 2014, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) published in the Federal Register a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking proposing an amendment to the annual privacy notice requirement set forth in subpart A of Regulation P (Annual Privacy Notice Proposal). The Annual Privacy Notice Proposal allowed a 30-day comment period that will end on June 12, 2014. To allow interested persons additional time to consider and submit their responses, the Bureau has determined that an extension of the comment period until July 14, 2014, is appropriate.

Remittance Proposal - Temporary Exception (Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)): Extension of Comment Period

On April 25, 2014, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) published in the Federal Register a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking proposing amendments to certain requirements set forth in subpart B of Regulation E related to remittance transfers (Remittance Proposal). The Remittance Proposal allowed a 30-day comment period that will end on May 27, 2014. To allow interested persons additional time to consider and submit their responses, the Bureau has determined that an extension of the comment period until June 6, 2014, is appropriate.

Debt Collection (Regulation F): Extension of Comment Period

On November 12, 2013, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (the Bureau) published in the Federal Register an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking about debt collection practices (Debt Collection ANPR). The Debt Collection ANPR allowed a 90-day comment period, closing on February 10, 2014. To allow interested persons more time to consider and craft their responses, the Bureau has determined that an extension of the comment period until February 28, 2014 is appropriate.

Debt Collection (Regulation F)

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the Bureau) is seeking comment, data, and information from the public about debt collection practices. Debt collection affects a significant number of consumers and the Bureau is considering proposing rules relating to debt collection. Therefore, the Bureau is interested in learning through responses to this advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPR) about the debt collection system, about consumer experiences with the debt collection system, and about how rules for debt collectors might protect consumers without imposing unnecessary burdens on industry.
Published

Equal Access to Justice Act Implementation Rule

The Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA or the Act) requires agencies that conduct adversary adjudications to award attorney fees and other litigation expenses to certain parties other than the United States in certain circumstances. EAJA also requires agencies that conduct adversary adjudications to establish procedures for the submission and consideration of applications for the award of fees and other expenses. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (Bureau) now issues an interim final rule establishing such procedures and seeks public comments.
Published

Procedural Rules to Establish Supervisory Authority over Certain Nonbank Covered Persons Based on Risk Determination

This proposed rule establishes procedures to implement section 1024(a)(1)(C) of Title X of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (12 U.S.C. 5514(a)(1)(C)). Pursuant to this provision, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) has the authority to supervise a nonbank covered person when the Bureau has reasonable cause to determine, by order, after notice to the person and a reasonable opportunity to respond, that such person is engaging, or has engaged, in conduct that poses risks to consumers with regard to the offering or provision of consumer financial products or services. This proposed rule sets forth the procedures by which the Bureau may subject a nonbank covered person to the Bureau's supervisory authority under 12 U.S.C. 5514(a)(1)(C). Under 12 U.S.C. 5514, the Bureau is authorized to require reports from, and conduct examinations of, entities made subject to its supervisory authority in this manner.

Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) (Prepaid Cards ANRPM)

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB or the Bureau) is seeking comment, data, and information from the public about general purpose reloadable (GPR) prepaid cards (GPR cards). GPR cards are a prepaid financial product that have been increasing in popularity and that some consumers now use in a manner similar to a debit card that is linked to a traditional checking account. The Bureau is particularly interested in learning more about this product, including its costs, benefits, and risks to consumers. The Bureau intends to issue a proposal to extend the Regulation E protections to GPR cards. Your comments, in conjunction with other outreach and analysis, will help the Bureau better understand and evaluate any potential consumer protection issues raised by the current design, marketing, and use of this product. This advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPR) asks ten broad questions about GPR cards.