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Understanding your financial aid offer

This personalized summary will help you evaluate your financial aid offer from your school to see how student debt may impact your future finances.

The information your school provided is missing the school ID, which is vital information for this tool to work. Please contact your school and ask them to ensure they are sending us the right school ID and it's in the correct format.

Once your school provides you with an updated URL link, you will be able to return here so you can continue reviewing the information in the tool.

The information your school provided is missing the program ID, which is vital information for this tool to work. Please contact your school and ask them to ensure they are sending us the right program ID and it's in the correct format.

Once your school provides you with an updated URL link, you will be able to return here so you can continue reviewing the information in the tool.

The information your school provided is missing the offer ID, which is vital information for this tool to work. Please contact your school and ask them to ensure they are sending us the right offer ID and it's in the correct format.

Once your school provides you with an updated URL link, you will be able to return here so you can continue reviewing the information in the tool.

Make sure that the information below is correct before reviewing your offer.

Ashford University
San Diego, CA
For-profit school
Program
Program type
Estimated total cost of program
$[XX] (tuition, fees, books, and supplies)
Estimated years to complete your program

Select how long you expect it to take to complete your program. This may be shorter than the program length below if you transferred in with credits that the school accepts. For example, it may be longer if you plan to attend part time or do not successfully complete your courses. We’ll use this to help calculate your total debt after graduation.

Offer ID
9e02801

As you go through the three sections of this tool, you’ll:

  1. Review your first-year financial aid offer,
  2. Evaluate the financial impact of accepting your financial aid offer by reviewing graduation rates, expected salaries, affordability, the program’s loan default rates, and other factors specific to your school and program, and
  3. Learn about your options to reduce student debt.

You must complete steps 1 and 2 of this tool before you can enroll.

About this tool

This tool uses data, financial terms and estimations that may need additional explanation. Learn more about the financial language, how calculations are created, and where the data comes from.

Get details about how this tool works

Step 1: Review your first year offer

Here is your financial aid offer from Ashford University. Please review the amounts provided by your school below and make any necessary changes or add any missing information. Please note any changes you make here will not change your financial aid offer or your eligibility for grants or loans. You will need to contact your school’s financial aid representative and work with them to update your financial aid package.

Updating...

How much does it cost to attend this school?

Includes the annual cost of the program (tuition, fees, books, and supplies) as well as ordinary living expenses that may be incurred regardless of enrollment (housing, meals, transportation, and other personal expenses)

Personal expenses like computers, daycare, entertainment, laundry, etc.

Total cost of attendance
$

Money you don’t have to pay back

Based on financial need, see how you qualify

The maximum that can be awarded per year is $0
The total of your federal aid can't be more than the total cost of attendance

Total amount awarded from your school

Total amount awarded from your state

Such as academic scholarships or grants from a foundation

Money for active or reserve servicemembers that you don’t have to pay back

The maximum that can be awarded per year is $0

Money for service members or veterans that you don’t have to pay back; see how much the GI Bill pays

Total grants and scholarships
$

Cost summary

Cost of attendance
$
Grants and scholarships
( − ) $
Your out-of-pocket cost
$

How much can you contribute without going into debt?

This section includes loans that your family has to repay, but those loans are not included in your personal debt or student loan payments summary.

Includes money that you can pay now or will earn during the school year

Includes money given to you from family or others, private loans your parents take out, etc.

Federal loans your parents take out and repay; does not count toward your total student loan debt shown in this tool

Money you earn per year from an eligible Federal Work-Study job while in school; awarded based on financial need

Contributions summary

Cash you will pay
$
Money your family/others will pay
( + ) $
Parent PLUS loans
( + ) $
Federal Work-Study
( + ) $
Your personal and family/others contributions
$

Big picture

Your out-of-pocket cost
$
Your contributions
( − ) $
Remaining cost
$

This is an estimate of the remaining costs of studying your program at Ashford University for one year.

How much would you have to borrow to cover the remaining cost?

Money you borrow from the federal government this year and have to pay back over time. Interest rates and loan fees on future federal loans may increase or decrease year to year.

The maximum that can be borrowed per year is $0

[XX]% interest

Reserved for students most in need; interest starts accumulating 9 months after you leave school; see how you qualify

The maximum that can be borrowed per year is $0

[XX]% interest

Interest starts accumulating 6 months after you leave school

[XX]% loan fee

Fee is deducted immediately from your loan amount, lowering the total you receive (for example, if the loan fee is 1%, then $10 will be subtracted from a $1,000 loan, so you or your school will only receive $990 but you would have to repay $1,000)

The maximum subsidized and unsubsidized loans that can be borrowed per year is $0

[XX]% interest

Interest starts accumulating when the money is sent to your school

[XX]% loan fee

Fee is deducted immediately from your loan amount, lowering the total you receive (for example, if the loan fee is 1%, then $10 will be subtracted from a $1,000 loan, so you or your school will only receive $990 but you would have to repay $1,000)

[XX]% interest

Interest starts accumulating when the money is sent to your school

[XX]% loan fee

Fee is deducted immediately from your loan amount, lowering the total you receive (for example, if the loan fee is 4%, then $40 will be subtracted from a $1,000 loan, so you or your school will only receive $960 but you would have to repay $1,000)

Total federal loans
$

Money from banks, schools, or others you have to pay back

Private loan

Interest starts accumulating when you sign the loan; may be a variable rate and increase or decrease in the future

%

Fee is added to the total loan amount (for example if the loan fee is 3%, then $30 would be added to a $1,000 loan, so you or your school receive $1,000 but you would have to repay $1,030)

%
Private loan

Starts accumulating when you sign the loan

%

Fee is added to the total loan amount (for example if the loan fee is 3%, then $30 would be added to a $1,000 loan, so you or your school receive $1,000 but you would have to repay $1,030)

%
Private loan

Starts accumulating when you sign the loan

%

Fee is added to the total loan amount (for example if the loan fee is 3%, then $30 would be added to a $1,000 loan, so you or your school receive $1,000 but you would have to repay $1,030)

%
Total private loans
$

A loan arrangement with your school that you pay back within a certain amount of time. The amount of the tuition payment plan shown here is the total awarded for the length of your entire program, not per year.

Full tuition payment plan amount divided by the estimated years to complete your program

[X.X]% interest

Interest starts accumulating when you leave or finish school

Payments start while you are in school and the loan must be paid back within [X] months

Total payment plans
$

Loans summary

Federal loans
$
Private loans
( + ) $
Tuition payment plan for one year
( + ) $
Total student loan debt
$

Big picture

Your out-of-pocket cost
$
Your contributions
( − ) $
Your debt
( − ) $
Remaining cost
$

This is an estimate of the remaining costs of studying your program at Ashford University for one year based on your inputs above.

What does this mean for your future?

It looks like you still have a remaining cost of [XX] to pay for the first year of school. You’ll either need to lower your cost of attendance, pay more upfront, or increase your loan amount to cover these costs.

It looks like you are borrowing [XX] more than you need to pay for school. You can reduce your future debt by decreasing your loan amount to cover only what you need.

Think about how borrowing [XX] this year will affect your future finances. As you can see in the summary, the total cost of these loans after [XX] plus interest and fees equals [XX].

Some students find themselves struggling to repay student debt once they leave school. In Step 2, learn how factors like graduation rates and expected salary can affect your ability to repay your student debt.

Big picture

Your out-of-pocket cost
$
Your contributions
( − ) $
Your debt
( − ) $
Remaining cost
$

After all the grants, scholarships, loans, and personal contributions, this is how much you still need to pay to attend Ashford University for one year.

Debt summary

Loans for first year
$
Loans for program length
Loans for [XX] (program length)
$
Total cost of repayment with interest and fees Assuming all interest rates and loan amounts remain the same for the entire program and a standard 10-year repayment plan
$

You may be eligible for a repayment plan that allows you to pay your loans over a period greater than 10 years.

Don’t forget you can edit amounts in your offer. These loan numbers will be used in Step 2 to help you evaluate your offer.

Editing amounts does not change your offer or your eligibility for grants or loans. If you want to change your financial aid package, you will need to contact your school’s financial aid representative and work with them to determine your eligibility.

Step 2: Weigh the financial impact of your offer

The information in this section will help you understand how accepting this offer could affect your ability to pay back your student debt and impact your financial future.

How many students graduate?

For first-time students enrolled full-time in at Ashford University, out of graduated.

Remember, whether you get your diploma or not, you’ll still have to repay federal and private loans (and possibly even some grants). If you don’t graduate, you won’t have the added benefit of your degree to help earn more money to put toward paying off student loans.

Graduation rate

Percentage of first-time, full-time students who graduate from your program at this school

This school
National average

Higher graduation rate than national average

About the same graduation rate as national average

Lower graduation rate than national average

We currently don’t have data to display for your school

We currently don’t have national average data to display

We currently don’t have data to display

How do I know if I'm about to take on too much debt?

According to your school, the average first-year salary for students graduating from your program is [XX] per year. In reality, you could end up making more or less than the salary shown here.

If your total debt is too high, it increases the chances of not being able to repay your loan on time and incurring late fees and more interest, or not being able to pay for other necessities, like rent or groceries. Since it’s difficult to predict your future salary, one way to lower your debt is to reduce the amount of student loans you take out.

Your salary and total student debt

A general rule of thumb for undergraduates is that you should avoid borrowing more for school than you’ll earn your first year out of school.

For graduate students, especially in medical residency programs, this rule of thumb may not apply.

Typical first-year salary for this program
[XX]
Estimated debt when repayment begins Includes interest and fees accrued while in school

Projected first-year salary is higher than total student debt

Projected first-year salary is about the same as total student debt

Projected first-year salary is lower than total student debt

We currently don’t have salary data to display for your school

We currently don’t have salary data to display

How much will I pay per month for all of my student loans?

Currently, your projected monthly student loan payment is [$XX], based on standard loan terms of [XX] years. Once you leave school, you are able to choose one of several different repayment options for your federal loans that may help reduce your monthly student loan payment.

Tuition, certain other educational expenses, and interest paid on federal loans may qualify for a federal tax credit or deduction. As a result, when you start repaying your loans, you may be able to reduce your federal tax burden . Please consult with your tax advisor.

Many of these alternative repayment plans are based on income and family size, which means the lower your salary, the lower your student loan payment. For instance, if you have a family of four with an annual income of $50,000, a monthly student loan payment would be set at $114. Depending on your income and family size it could be as low as $0. If you select one of these income based repayment plans you may be paying off your loans for up to of 20 to 25 years.

Another payment option extends your repayment over 25 years, which means you would have a lower monthly student loan payment but a higher total cost of interest over the life of the loan.

These repayment plans typically aren’t available for private student loans. If you’re still not able to make payments on your loans, you could go into default.

Your estimated monthly payment

Based on a standard loan term of 10 years

Calculate your monthly payment

Once you leave school, you can choose one of several available repayment options.

Your projected loan payment
Total cost of repayment with interest and fees

See how loan length affects your payments

How will I afford my loan payment?

Think about how much money you can expect to make if you graduate and get a job in your field, and then evaluate how much of that will go toward living expenses and loan payments. In reality, you could end up making more or less than the salaries shown here.

Keep in mind your school has a job placement rate of [X.X]% for students who graduate and get a job in their field of study within six months of graduating.

Your estimated debt burden

We calculate your debt burden by dividing your monthly loan payment by the average salary for students who attended your school.

Your projected loan payment
/ mo.
Average salary
/ yr.
/ mo.
loan payment
/
monthly salary
=
of your income

Loan payment is lower than recommended 8% of salary

Loan payment is equal to recommended 8% of salary

Loan payment is higher than recommended 8% of salary

See how loan length affects your debt burden

Estimated budget after you leave school (adjust as needed)

Average monthly living expenses for someone and their family making [$XX] /year (the average national salary for all students who attended college) in the region you plan to live (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics ). Your expenses may be higher or lower.

Average monthly salary Before taxes
$
Monthly student loan payment Based on -year repayment plan
( − ) $
Total left at the end of the month
Your total expenses are higher than your estimated monthly salary

What if I can’t afford my student loan payments?

Defaulting on a loan can happen when you fail to make scheduled payments over a certain period of time. This length of time can vary based on the type of loan. It can also mean added fees and interest because the debt isn’t paid off in time. Defaulting on a loan can negatively impact your credit rating, which could make it more difficult in the future to borrow money to purchase a car or a home. Defaulting could also result in wage garnishment.

Loan default rates

Percentage of students from this program who default on loans after entering repayment

40%
This school
National average

Lower default rate than national average

The same default rate as national average

Higher default rate than national average

We currently don’t have data to display for your school

We currently don’t have national average data to display

We currently don’t have data to display

It's estimated you'll owe [XX] to complete this program in at Ashford University. Do you better understand how this may impact your future finances?

Do you feel like going into [XX] of debt to attend this school is a good investment in your future?

Your response will not be shared with your school and does not affect your ability to accept or reject the actual offer from your school.

Step 3: Consider your options

If you are interested in lowering your amount of debt, there are things you can do. Here are some choices you can make that may help you improve your financial future.

Step 3: A few more things to consider

It’s important to feel confident in the financial decisions you are making. Here are some additional choices you can make that may help you improve your financial future even more.

Step 3: Consider your options

If you are interested in lowering your amount of debt, there are things you can do.

Here are some choices you can make that may help you improve your financial future.

Maximize all available grants and scholarships.

Consider applying for additional scholarships and grants , which provide money you don’t have to repay. By increasing the amount of this type of aid, you can decrease the overall amount of debt you have to borrow—and consequently pay back.

Reduce your living costs.

Living at home or finding cheaper off-campus housing can reduce the cost of attendance , meaning you can borrow less money overall.

Consider a different program with better outcomes.

Salaries are often influenced by the degree you earn. If the projected salary of your program is far below the national average or the job placement rate seems low, you might consider a different program with a higher projected earning potential. Ask your admission representative or search for gainful employment information on your school’s website to learn more about job placement rates and the average salaries of graduates.

Make sure you don’t have to take classes twice.

Ask if credits from your school transfer to degrees earned at other schools. [XX]% of students who start at this school finish here. In the case you decide to finish your education somewhere else, it’s important to know if the hard work you’ve put into your degree will be honored at another school.

Explore other schools that have similar programs.

Review your total cost of attendance and determine if a less expensive school option (such as a community college) might also meet your educational needs. See all schools that offer the same type of program in your area.

Think about working while you study.

Nearly two-thirds of college students work while they are enrolled in school. While not for everyone, earning money from a job, even if it’s not related to your field of study, can help reduce the amount of money you need to borrow to pay for school, resulting in long-term benefits of reducing overall debt. Check out resources for finding a job , including links to job search sites, tips for writing a résumé, and more.

Next steps

We have notified your school that you have reviewed your personalized offer. You can now move forward in the enrollment process.

  1. Review any changes you made to your offer. If you decide to move forward using any adjusted amount of aid, you need to contact your financial aid representative and work with them to update your financial aid plan.

    Changes you make using this tool are meant for your guidance only. They are not sent to your school and do not affect your actual financial aid offer.

    If you want to change your offer in any way, contact your school’s financial aid representative to have your financial aid offer updated.

  2. Keep a copy of this personalized aid information.

    You can print a summary of the aid information in this tool or save it as a PDF. Use this as a reference while talking with your school.

If the information provided is not correct, please contact your school and ask them to fix it. Once your school provides you with an updated link, you will be able to return so you can continue reviewing the information in the tool.