What happens to your student loans if your school is shut down

When you’re told that your college will be shutting down, there can be a lot of uncertainty about what comes next. Here is some helpful advice to help you navigate the situation.

This information and answers to other common questions about student loans are also available through Ask CFPB.

If you have federal student loans

If you have federal student loans and are currently enrolled or recently left a college or university that has shut its doors, you may be able to discharge (cancel) your loans if you apply for a loan discharge .

This option is only a possibility if your school closes. If you are attending a school that is sold, you may not be eligible to ask for discharge under this process, even if your school no longer offers your program of study.

If you do have your federal loans discharged and you end up transferring credits to a similar program, you may have to pay back the loans that were discharged.

You may have to pay income taxes if you get your student loans discharged when your school closes. If you don’t think you can afford to do so, you can petition the IRS to reduce your tax bill. Contact the Office of the Taxpayer Advocate to learn about your options.

If you have private student loans

Generally, if you have private student loans, you will still be responsible for repaying them. However, some states may have programs that assist students with private student loans in the event of a school closure. In addition, some private student lenders may offer options to assist certain borrowers in this situation.

If you think you won’t be able to afford to repay your private student loan, you should contact your student loan servicer immediately to learn more about your options. And if you run into trouble, you can also submit a complaint online or by calling (855) 411-2372.

If you’re offered an option for a “teach-out” to complete your program

If your school has announced that it is closing, you may be offered a “teach out,” an arrangement through which you may be able to complete your program and receive your degree or certificate.

If you accept a “teach-out” to complete your program at your school or another school, you will be responsible for repaying all of your student loans. If you decline a “teach-out” offer and the school closes, you may not have to pay back your federal student loans.

Rohit Chopra is the CFPB’s Student Loan Ombudsman. To learn more about the CFPB’s work for students and young Americans, visit consumerfinance.gov/students.

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